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Old 02-22-2013, 09:48 AM
 
6,637 posts, read 4,614,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I think so ... Wasn't the premise that fabric stores are too big?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I believe so, yes.
What? How can a fabric store be too big? We have a great big (non-chain) one near me where you can get any type of fabric or trim you could ever need under one roof. In fact, when I think about it, it may be slightly too small.
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,056 posts, read 102,770,515 times
Reputation: 33109
Quote:
Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
What? How can a fabric store be too big? We have a great big (non-chain) one near me where you can get any type of fabric or trim you could ever need under one roof. In fact, when I think about it, it may be slightly too small.
The seamstresses on the board would agree with you, at least THIS seamstress.
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Old 02-22-2013, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,093 posts, read 16,130,435 times
Reputation: 12695
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The seamstresses on the board would agree with you, at least THIS seamstress.
Do they have Segways with attachable shopping carts provided for your fabric exploring convenience? Shuttle to take you across the hot lava parking lot moat?
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Old 02-22-2013, 02:35 PM
 
4,366 posts, read 3,247,194 times
Reputation: 7389
Back to the OP, I find the architecture of the area in which I live very important.

I lived in an area that I found unappealing for a couple of years. The area had rundown, shoddily built buildings, with no architectural consistency, and faux architectural details. It was a very depressing experience. I found myself traveling far away for entertainment and shopping, or just staying indoors to avoid the ugly neighborhood/city.

It was a relief when I moved away.
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Old 02-22-2013, 03:55 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,959 posts, read 7,620,133 times
Reputation: 9324
Totally important. A city, area or neighborhood that is all new is dead and sterile to me, rarely does the scale, the variability of the architecture and types of buildings, uses and any degree of funkiness apparent or done right a newly developed area. The best cities and areas are those that have a built history that defines them.

I only considered historic neighborhoods when house hunting and I am in a beautiful 86 y.o. house in about the oldest and best preserved neighborhood in the city. It also has the highest price appreciation in the city so obviously I am not alone in appreciating it being defined by its intact historic fabric.
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,056 posts, read 102,770,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sage 80 View Post
Back to the OP,
Did it not occur to you (plural) we were being absurd, talking about fabric? Speaking for myself, I was pointing out the absurdity of using a term more appropriate to fiction. I did get several reps for my first post about fabric and fabric stores.
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:48 PM
 
4,366 posts, read 3,247,194 times
Reputation: 7389
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Did it not occur to you (plural) we were being absurd, talking about fabric? Speaking for myself, I was pointing out the absurdity of using a term more appropriate to fiction. I did get several reps for my first post about fabric and fabric stores.
Of course, I got it. What's not to get? I just wanted to get back to the original topic.
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Old 02-22-2013, 06:52 PM
 
9,522 posts, read 14,877,980 times
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I prefer modern. Historic buildings can be interesting to visit but rarely any fun to live or work in.
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Old 02-22-2013, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,897 posts, read 7,671,799 times
Reputation: 4513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Did it not occur to you (plural) we were being absurd, talking about fabric? Speaking for myself, I was pointing out the absurdity of using a term more appropriate to fiction. I did get several reps for my first post about fabric and fabric stores.
What term is more appropriate to fiction? I only read opinions, so didn't see anything absurd, either.
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Central Jersey
386 posts, read 579,370 times
Reputation: 962
It's very important to me, as well. I find some contemporary architecture to be interesting, and if it's integrated into a cityscape, that's fine. But post-modern strip mall aesthetics leave me cold. I feel there's a big difference between appreciating novel design, and insisting on the supremacy of the new over the old.

There's something both sublime and charming about the "unnecessary" details to be found in historical architecture. Some people prefer Gothic churches to Baroque, for example, but who but the most impoverished soul would want to get rid of them both in favor of some post-modern a-frame chapel?

Incidentally, I think one of the reasons Europe (or even some East Coast American cities) preserves more historical buildings --- and modern elements are often introduced in a manner which compliments earlier styles --- is because they have more pedestrian zones. In places which are more car-centric, like Atlanta or Houston, for example, it's more difficult to appreciate the architecture; every building becomes a functional hub surrounded by parking lots.
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