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Old 03-01-2013, 12:14 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
Even with my desire to leave New York, regular trips back WILL be necessary for stuff like this...and of course to see my family..
Been making these return trips to the holy land for many years now ... when it comes to bagels and pizza, absence makes the taste buds grow fonder.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:48 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkarch View Post
How about tyson's? It's denser, and as far as I know the most dense business district in all of NoVa - but it's certainly not walkable just yet.
I prefer to keep city for incorporated cities (at least in the US) while I accept in theory that an unincorparated place could be a city, I dont know of any that are, yet. As you point out, Tysons today does not resemble a downtown (whether it will by 2050, I do not know, though I hope it will). And even if it does, a city is more than a downtown - its a downtown plus surrounding areas that usually gradually step down in density, or in other ways show the centrality of downtown. Tysons is surrounded by low density suburbs, and the road network, the density gradient, etc are still more about the location of the metro core in downtown DC then they are about Tysons, despite Tysons huge gravitational pull.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:50 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
Off topic, but is it northeast thing to call pizza "bagels"?

only if they are pizza bagels

Pizza Bagels | Einstein Bros Bagels
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:53 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Well it's still going to be boring, that much I know.

I assume you mean in layout and design. There's already loads of retail, movies, restaurants, and I think a few bars and clubs (I dont follow those so much) It defintely needs more in the way of arts venues, parks, and similar public facilities. It lacks the kind of layout (and even after densifing it will) for hip retail - all the walkable retail will be new and will command too high rents.

Whether it will become walkable - I think the individual sectors of it stand a good chance, but crossing 7 and 123 will be issues.
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Old 03-01-2013, 03:42 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,107,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
I assume you mean in layout and design. There's already loads of retail, movies, restaurants, and I think a few bars and clubs (I dont follow those so much) It defintely needs more in the way of arts venues, parks, and similar public facilities. It lacks the kind of layout (and even after densifing it will) for hip retail - all the walkable retail will be new and will command too high rents.
I think I meant as far as nightlife is concerned. The DC social scene is quite boring (to me), and Arlington is even worse. I expect Saturday nights in TC to be an even weaker distillation. Similar-dressed young defense contractors networking at a now-walkable Houlihan's or something.

Nothing wrong with that, it's just not for me.
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Old 03-01-2013, 07:06 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,842,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
I prefer to keep city for incorporated cities (at least in the US) while I accept in theory that an unincorparated place could be a city, I dont know of any that are, yet.
Columbia, MD. Technically it's an overgrown homeowner's association.
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Old 03-02-2013, 10:51 AM
 
7,936 posts, read 5,048,234 times
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Returning to the original subject, we have two mega-trends: (1) the US population will keep growing rapidly, and (2) escalating cost of energy will make long private automotive commutes ever more expensive. Even if city-cores fall out of fashion as today's youth become tomorrow's middle-aged parents, it'd doubtful that we'll reprise the trends of the 1950s-1980s, with mass flight from cities to suburbs. First, there isn't enough space left to build new suburbs, unless people accept 50-mile commutes. And second, they won't be able to afford those commutes.
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Old 03-02-2013, 03:44 PM
 
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Population growth seems to be slowing down; the US total fertility is around 1.9 at the moment - down from 2.1 a few years ago. That's actually at the same level as France and a few other European countries. Basically, fewer younger people are having kids, fewer are getting married, and childlessness is rising among women in their 40's, which is usually considered a demographic cutoff point after which they are unlikely to bear children at all.

This is an interesting trend. If suburbanization is driven at least in part by concerns over schools and yard space, a lack of kids would presumably reduce the desire to suburbanize.

And it's actually possible to have a declining national population while the major cities become even more populated. We see this in Japan; the countryside is losing young people to the big cities and losing old people via attrition. The population loss is not visible if you only visit the cities. They, in fact, continue to grow steadily.
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Old 03-02-2013, 03:50 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,634,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Returning to the original subject, we have two mega-trends: (1) the US population will keep growing rapidly, and (2) escalating cost of energy will make long private automotive commutes ever more expensive. Even if city-cores fall out of fashion as today's youth become tomorrow's middle-aged parents, it'd doubtful that we'll reprise the trends of the 1950s-1980s, with mass flight from cities to suburbs. First, there isn't enough space left to build new suburbs, unless people accept 50-mile commutes. And second, they won't be able to afford those commutes.
1) is not going to happen. See the post below yours.

2) may not happen either. Electric cars and hybrids are becoming mainstream.
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Old 03-03-2013, 04:03 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,238 posts, read 18,757,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
1)

2) may not happen either. Electric cars and hybrids are becoming mainstream.
And internal combustion only cars keep getting more efficient as well. As an example Ford is bringing out a 1000cc 3 cylinder turbo Fiesta this year and Chevy a diesel Cruze. And guys like me who used to drive big V-8 Crown Vics are now driving 4 cylinder Focuses and such.
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