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Old 02-27-2013, 10:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkarch View Post
My thought is these suburban areas will increasingly be considered an 'inferior good' only for those that are not financially savvy enough have secured a more urban home. Personally I've seen many people justify their suburban fringe housing purchases on flawed reasoning - namely that owning a home, regardless of the location is a key to financial stability.

I expect we'll see this around edge cities and increasingly dense, previously suburban population centers too - not just around old urban cores. In some cases the old suburban cores have an advantage because they have more control over zoning,, even if they do struggle to convert from car-centricity.
Are you kidding me? Is this post a bad attempt at humor?
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:57 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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There's a paradox here in that as more conventional middle class people move to the cities the cities will then become more conventional and boring; suburbs with smaller yards so to speak. Where you gonna find a good Polish or Bohemian bakery then? Why out in the burbs of course.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Canada
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Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
Are you kidding me? Is this post a bad attempt at humor?
It seems crazy from an American perspective, but internationally the suburbs being the bad part of town and the city being the nice part is really quite common. In Vancouver, Surrey, our largest suburb, is looked down on as the rough part of the metro while the city of Vancouver is the nicest and most prestigious area. It's the same way in Paris, Toronto to a degree, and Prague, just to name a few.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:56 AM
 
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No I get it BIMBAM-- but it really only applies to the old and or "global" cities. The dynamic you speak of exists in NYC, San Fran and DC. Certain neighborhoods in Manhattan are more prestigious than anything the suburbs can dish up (Greenwich, Scarsdale, Manhasset, Short Hills etc). But this statement is quite a stretch for middle tier cities, regardless of geography.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:57 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Vancouver isn't old and it's a bit of a stretch to call it a global city.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishtom29 View Post
There's a paradox here in that as more conventional middle class people move to the cities the cities will then become more conventional and boring; suburbs with smaller yards so to speak. Where you gonna find a good Polish or Bohemian bakery then? Why out in the burbs of course.
Never been to a polish or bohemian bakery, and I don't see your scenario happening(that is people who want to live in a city, suddenly finding it boring).
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Vancouver isn't old and it's a bit of a stretch to call it a global city.
It's also a bit of stretch to call Surrey a suburb, when it is a satellite city to Vancouver. Akin to Newark, NJ and not surprisingly a less desirable place when contrasted with the core urban center.

Also for what it's worth, multiple sources deem Vancouver as Global city (Globalization and World Cities Research Network, The Economist, The Atlantic, top 20 in the latter two)
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:16 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
It's also a bit of stretch to call Surrey a suburb, when it is a satellite city to Vancouver. Akin to Newark, NJ and not surprisingly a less desirable place when contrasted with the core urban center.
Surrey, from what I can tell, is largely middle class, not a partially ghettoitzed rut belt city. Large suburban municipalities are the norm in Canada, Surrey is the largest in the Vancouver metro, but a number of others are similar.
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:31 PM
 
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Surburban municipality? Surrey is a city, although I suppose it could be first suburb with 470,000 residents.
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:34 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
Surburban municipality? Surrey is a city, although I suppose it could be first suburb with 470,000 residents.
It's common for locations in the Western US and Canada outside the city limits to incorporate with the name "city". Mississauga, Ontario has 713,000 people. The town of Hempstead, New York has 760,000 people, and even though it is not called "city", towns in New York state are rather independent.
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