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Old 02-27-2013, 12:34 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
Surburban municipality? Surrey is a city, although I suppose it could be first suburb with 470,000 residents.
Hempstead, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

759,000
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:50 PM
 
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Hempstead is a collection of 22 villages and 37 hamlets-- which is where the residents live. Hempstead is basically a government unit. Is Surrey (formally) subdivided into smaller formal jurisdictions similar to Hempstead?
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:54 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
Hempstead is a collection of 22 villages and 37 hamlets-- which is where the residents live. Hempstead is basically a government unit. Is Surrey (formally) subdivided into smaller formal jurisdictions similar to Hempstead?
Even it isn't, why do you say it isn't a suburb?
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:57 PM
 
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Here is some language from the Surrey BC website.

"On behalf of Surrey City Council, I am pleased to welcome you to our City!

As the 12th largest city in Canada and the second largest in British Columbia, Surrey is able to offer visitors a rich blend of diverse landscapes, abundant parks, rich cultural opportunities and superb recreational choices. Our friendly and diverse residents are always happy to make new friends"

It's not a suburb. It's a city, and it's not simple because it is common to do so in the Western US and Canada.

http://www.surrey.ca/3547.aspx
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Old 02-27-2013, 01:06 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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So are Long Beach and Glen Gove LI not suburbs? They are cities.
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Old 02-27-2013, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Regardless of whether or not you call it a city, it's still nothing like Newark. A lot of suburbs incorporate as cities and call themselves cities to make themselves sound important for branding purposes... In British Columbia, it seems you can either be a city, or if your population is lower, a town, or a district municipality if the municipality contains a lot of rural land, in any case, there's certainly no type of municipality that is official designated as "suburb" in BC.

But Surrey only had 3.2% of its current population in 1941, so its development was largely shape by the post-WWII development mindset which is quite auto-oriented. It's at the edge of the Vancouver urban area, doesn't have much of a downtown in the traditional sense, most of its so called downtown consists of shopping malls, strip malls and parking lots with a few isolated condo towers (although it's working on building more of a proper downtown).

I'm not sure it's that fair to say Surrey is an undesirable place to live though. It grew from 395,000 to 468,000 just from 2006 to 2011, if it was so undesirable there probably wouldn't be so many people moving there... Real estate there is cheaper than in Vancouver proper, although poverty levels don't seem to be worse than average (or than Vancouver's).

Brampton is similar in many ways, it's cheaper than Toronto and many other suburbs, it's growing at a very fast pace, is predominantely post WWII and auto-oriented, and has a large population (510,000) for a suburb although Brampton seems to be a bit more of a bedroom community. Coincidentally they both have a very large South Asian population.
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:56 PM
 
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Quote:
A lot of suburbs incorporate as cities and call themselves cities to make themselves sound important for branding purposes...
I don't think any of what you wrote is a defining aspect of a 'city', where 'city' denotes a population greater than 100,000 or 200,000 or whatever. If a majority of the area population lives and works there, then it's a city. If a majority of the population lives there but drives into some other place to work, then it's a suburb.
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Old 02-27-2013, 04:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
No I get it BIMBAM-- but it really only applies to the old and or "global" cities. The dynamic you speak of exists in NYC, San Fran and DC. Certain neighborhoods in Manhattan are more prestigious than anything the suburbs can dish up (Greenwich, Scarsdale, Manhasset, Short Hills etc). But this statement is quite a stretch for middle tier cities, regardless of geography.
No, it's not a stretch. It's a phenomenon you see more in those cities but it can happen anywhere. It can even happen within suburbs. Take a walk around Reston or Bellevue and you'll see people paying more to rent or buy property in the core than on the fringe. Reston and Bellevue are sattelite cities that started off mainly as suburbs and grew from there. Neither is a big global city or close in status to the major city they are a sattelite of.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
Surburban municipality? Surrey is a city, although I suppose it could be first suburb with 470,000 residents.
Surrey is a prototypical suburb. It only exists because of the proximity to Vancouver. If Vancouver were 100 miles north, surrey wouldn't be what it is.
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Old 02-27-2013, 05:00 PM
 
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Newark wouldn't be what it is if NYC were further away but it is still a city, just like Stamford, White Plains and jersey City Reston va is a densely populated suburb, not a city.
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Old 02-27-2013, 05:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
Newark wouldn't be what it is if NYC were further away but it is still a city, just like Stamford, White Plains and jersey City Reston va is a densely populated suburb, not a city.

Why is Reston not a city? Because it's not incorporated? If you're here just to argue semantics that is boring. This thread is about the trend towards urban living, not the technicalities of how Fairfax County provisions municipal resources.
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