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Old 02-24-2013, 02:47 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,602 times
Reputation: 217

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Here's a new community, Serenbe, based around some of these principles...
(But without quite so much "agriculture" at the heart)



At home at Serenbe, Georgia

Let’s say you could create the perfect place to live. Blank slate. Anything you want.

You might want a place where your quality of life was extraordinarily high. Where you felt an easy sense of community. Where the principles of sustainability touched everything from your home’s methods of construction to the organic produce on your table that was grown by one of your neighbors.

Speaking of neighbors, you might prefer an eclectic group, from artists to writers to farmers to business people. You might like to walk paths that take you through both forest and meadow, ride horses along tree-canopied trails, or hear music outdoors in your neighborhood amphitheatre. Maybe you’d just like a place to get away, a place where you can enjoy a simpler life. For miles around you the Chattahoochee Hill Country is protected with a master plan that calls for 80% green space.

===
/see: Serenbe Community
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Old 02-24-2013, 02:50 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,602 times
Reputation: 217
Live and work at the village center



The Live/Work spaces at Serenbe are like having a Manhattan loft in the middle of the woods. These homes will be designed by a team of architects, led by Lew Oliver, to create a well-planned, compact space for living and working.

The ground floor of each of these two- or three-story units is a storefront to be used as a studio, workshop or retail space, with the living quarters located above, not unlike small town main streets of long ago, where shopkeepers often lived above the store.


/ as I find other communities with similar visions, I will post links here /
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Old 02-24-2013, 03:41 AM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,720,869 times
Reputation: 713
The Bronx is quickly becoming the Green borough of New York City.

Quote:
Kale Grows on Rooftop in Morrisania

http://assets.dnainfo.com/generated/...age640x480.jpg

MORRISANIA — There are plants on the wall, songs in the stairwell and a farm on the roof at Arbor House, a new eight-story affordable housing development built on an unused corner of a public housing complex.
The $38 million privately owned building at 770 E. 166th St., once the site of a walkway leading into NYCHA's Forest Houses, features 124 subsidized apartments and a host of amenities, from the lobby's green wall to the rooftop greenhouses, that push healthy, sustainable living.

Read more: Kale Grows on Rooftop in Morrisania - DNAinfo.com New York
Quote:
Healthier Eating Starts on the Roof

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/...ticleLarge.jpg

At Via Verde, a new affordable housing complex being marketed in the South Bronx, what started as an idea to provide environmentally friendly green roofs back in 2005 turned into an opportunity to provide gardening plots for residents, said Paul Freitag, a managing director of development at the Jonathan Rose Companies, one of the development partners on Via Verde.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/08/re...roof.html?_r=0
Quote:
Proposed Hunts Point Rooftop Farm Could Be World's Largest

Private developers are being sought by the city to build a farm atop the 200,000-square-foot roof of a warehouse in the neighborhood's sprawling food distribution zone, creating the potential for one of the largest rooftop farms in the world.

Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2012...#ixzz2LoPxDvvm

Last edited by nei; 02-24-2013 at 09:40 AM.. Reason: copyright violations
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Old 02-24-2013, 05:16 AM
 
5,691 posts, read 8,758,435 times
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I grow about 1/3 - 1/2 of the vegetables I eat at home. Some things don't grow well in this climate. Winter vegetables are finicky. Some years are good but one hot spell and a lot of stuff goes to seed. Some stuff I prefer "store bought" like canned tomatoes with the spices cooked in. Frozen green beans are a LOT easier than growing them at home.

Quote:
Also, what do you think of zoning or HOA regulations which may prevent you from growing food, and force you to grow a lawn requiring water, cutting, and fertilizer. Some huge percentage of suburbnite's time can go into tending this expensive luxury.
Please don't ruin a good discussion with your rants. I don't think you realize how harmful your smug pollution is. When the likes of you insult ordinary citizens with your self righteous rants the typical reaction is to vote right wing republican in protest.
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Old 02-24-2013, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,473 posts, read 5,145,696 times
Reputation: 3531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
Urban Agrarianism : Are Americans ready for it?

This new thread arises from a posting on the Detroit Forum


Grow food, in communities-organised-around-agriculture, I suppose.
And live locally, organised around a Main Street, or village center, as we did in times gone by.


There's some truth to what you say. But are Americans really that different from Brits or Europeans?
There are cultural differences - car use, gun owning - that have been reinforced by the American living arrangement. But if you listen to me, and also to writers like JH Kunstler, we are moving into a period (The Long Emergency?) where we will once again be more reliant on neighbors, and a sense of community may re-emerge.

As for China, we should be less arrogant, and be more willing to learn from other countries, including China. They are building a transport system for the 21st century, and we are still mired in one built for the 1950's.


I am very happy to see many Detroiters embracing urban farming:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9HVOtNN8Uc

There may be some long term answers in this.


Economic depression is bringing about a change in the culture - slow though it may be.

Look to the new denser communities that are emerging.
And take a look at the new Urban Agrarian trend

Book Review :
Agrarian Urbanism - Andres Duany

Video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UPSl9NQyXI

There are many American visionaries point the way. I am just one of the very smallest ones (though I am over 6-feet tall.)
I am going to hear Andres Duany speak about this next week. Steve Mouzon had mentioned that locally-sourced in season food supplies are essential components of a sustainable community just as they have been for thousands of years.

Many great ideas. However, the progress in getting the message to the masses often seems like sending radio waves into space. It is encouraging to see many young people moving to more affordable, often grittier, cities and working to improve those communities by helping to encourage simple and practical changes.

It would be great if a network, like HGTV, could offer some regular shows that highlight these positive developments in addition to their design programs that focus largely on rehabs that add stainless steel appliances and granite counter tops.

Last edited by Lincolnian; 02-24-2013 at 07:06 AM..
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,602 times
Reputation: 217
I think people will find the Vision behind these places attractive, and if they CAN EXECUTE well,
then they may inspire many copycats

Here's the Serenbe Mission - it is more about The Arts, than agriculture:

: link

A community where people authentically live, work, learn and play in celebration of life’s beauty
a place where connections between people, nature and the arts are nourished
At Serenbe we:

Bring people together to learn and explore ideas about the environment, sensitive development, and new ways of thinking and planning for the future ...

More:
Link our commitment to the environment with creative vision to create and celebrate art
Use today’s and tomorrow’s technology as tool...

=== ===

But they do have an Organic Farming section:

Grange, currently under construction, is the farm hamlet, given its proximity to the Serenbe Organic Farms and Serenbe Stables. With hilly terrain and sweeping views of 50 miles of greenspace, the lake, and preserved forestland, homes here will feel as though they’re nestled in a mountain retreat. Grange will also be home to a barbecue restaurant, a tack store, feed and seed shop, and arts and crafts studios.
== ==

Nurturing Serenbe's 25 acres of organic fields is certainly labor, but, for Paige Witherington, manager of Serenbe's organic farm, it's a labor of love.

Last edited by Geologic; 02-24-2013 at 07:32 AM..
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:11 AM
 
3,463 posts, read 4,539,930 times
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There is a movement (?) that is encouraging all greenery in cities to be eatable.

This is sort of related, but of course Google will bring up zillions more:
Designing Our Future: Sustainable Landscapes

The Godzilla in the room though, is that we are breeding faster than a feral cat colony. Over 7 BILLION people, 1/2 of that since the 70's. We are reproducing at a rate that is simply unsustainable. Where are all these people going to find jobs ?
Where is the waste going to go? I dont think the negative effect of all this hyper-consuming/breeding/waste can be calculated other to say what we are seeing now is only going to get exponentially worse by the decade.
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,602 times
Reputation: 217
Outside Atlanta, a Utopia Rises

The New York Times
By KEVIN SACK / Published: February 23, 2009

EACH morning, as the breakfast dishes are cleared, Nick Melvin escapes the kitchen at the Inn at Serenbe, where he is the executive chef, and drives five minutes down a country road to a sumptuous 25-acre organic farm. There he examines the collards and the mache, the sunchoke and the carrots, and decides what looks best for that night’s table and next week’s menu at the Farmhouse, Serenbe’s acclaimed restaurant...

[snip]

===
/more: http://travel.nytimes.com/2009/03/01...th&emc=th&_r=0

Last edited by nei; 02-24-2013 at 09:37 AM.. Reason: copyright violation
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,602 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderkat59 View Post
There is a movement (?) that is encouraging all greenery in cities to be eatable.

The Godzilla in the room though, is that we are breeding faster than a feral cat colony. Over 7 BILLION people, 1/2 of that since the 70's. We are reproducing at a rate that is simply unsustainable. Where are all these people going to find jobs ?
Here's the answer:
Educate women, and give them jobs other than as breeding machines, and the birthrate goes down, normally to below the replacement rate of 2.2 children per woman.

In fact, I think the entire Caucasian race may be at or below replacement rate already (this number will be hard to check, given "political correctness")

The problem with rapid breeding is poor and uneducated people, so raise their income and educational level, and it may be self-correcting
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:52 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
I know we discussed this before, but do any of you urbanists know how to preserve the food once you've grown it?
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