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Old 02-24-2013, 07:56 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33075

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderkat59 View Post
There is a movement (?) that is encouraging all greenery in cities to be eatable.

This is sort of related, but of course Google will bring up zillions more:
Designing Our Future: Sustainable Landscapes

The Godzilla in the room though, is that we are breeding faster than a feral cat colony. Over 7 BILLION people, 1/2 of that since the 70's. We are reproducing at a rate that is simply unsustainable. Where are all these people going to find jobs ?
Where is the waste going to go? I dont think the negative effect of all this hyper-consuming/breeding/waste can be calculated other to say what we are seeing now is only going to get exponentially worse by the decade.
That's all BS. The birth rate in the US is at its lowest rate ever, and yes, I have posted links about it and I'm not going to do it again. You can do a search if you're interested. The birth rates in many countries in Europe and Japan are also very low, and have been for some time. Even in developing countries, birth rates are going down.

Malthusian catastrophe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,477 posts, read 5,148,540 times
Reputation: 3532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That's all BS. The birth rate in the US is at its lowest rate ever, and yes, I have posted links about it and I'm not going to do it again. You can do a search if you're interested. The birth rates in many countries in Europe and Japan are also very low, and have been for some time. Even in developing countries, birth rates are going down.

Malthusian catastrophe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The United States has many cities and towns that would welcome more people. Many of these areas are located near farmlands and other natural resources.

Cultural values are important. The past two or three decades we seem to have lost our identity as a nation. An American culture that promotes acceptance, support and cooperation as opposed to economic status, material acquisition, and competitiveness could provide the solution to many of our economic and societal problems and allow many people to realize the happiness that alludes them.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:12 AM
 
6,635 posts, read 4,600,830 times
Reputation: 13350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I know we discussed this before, but do any of you urbanists know how to preserve the food once you've grown it?
Good point. Freezing is a poor choice for food preservation. It requires a large and expensive freezer that then comsumes additional electricity to run and food, especially vegetables, are frequently freezer burned before they can be used. And all is lost if the electricity goes out for any extended period of time.

Canning is far superior, but I doubt many would be able to can vegetables in a small urban kitchen. And once they were canned, where would they be stored? In fact, in my experience, it's a hard job even in a large suburban kitchen. Perhaps you've hit on the next great business, canning and warehousing veggies for all the urbanista gardners!
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:29 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,195,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That's all BS. The birth rate in the US is at its lowest rate ever, and yes, I have posted links about it and I'm not going to do it again. You can do a search if you're interested. The birth rates in many countries in Europe and Japan are also very low, and have been for some time. Even in developing countries, birth rates are going down.

Malthusian catastrophe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Try reading his post again. He is talking about "world" population, you are talking about USA/Europe population.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:35 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Try reading his post again. He is talking about "world" population, you are talking about USA/Europe population.
Try reading my response again. The birth rate is going down EVERYWHERE.

World population may actually start declining, not exploding. - Slate Magazine
**From 1960 to 2009, Mexico’s fertility rate tumbled from 7.3 live births per woman to 2.4, India’s dropped from six to 2.5, and Brazil’s fell from 6.15 to 1.9. Even in sub-Saharan Africa, where the average birthrate remains a relatively blistering 4.66, fertility is projected to fall below replacement level by the 2070s. This change in developing countries will affect not only the U.S. population, of course, but eventually the world’s.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,382 posts, read 59,858,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
Canning is far superior, but I doubt many would be able to can vegetables in a small urban kitchen.
Storage is an issue -- you really need a dark, cool place -- but all you need to can vegetables is a stove, a sink, a little bit of prep space, and a pressure canner. The size of the kitchen is irrelevant; more space is nice, of course, but not absolutely necessary.

Quote:
Perhaps you've hit on the next great business, canning and warehousing veggies for all the urbanista gardners!
There has been quite a resurgence in interest in canning, even amongst urbanistas (witness the rise in prices in canning jars! ). There are jar swaps and classes and all kinds of fun stuff around here.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:10 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Storage is an issue -- you really need a dark, cool place -- but all you need to can vegetables is a stove, a sink, a little bit of prep space, and a pressure canner. The size of the kitchen is irrelevant; more space is nice, of course, but not absolutely necessary.


There has been quite a resurgence in interest in canning, even amongst urbanistas (witness the rise in prices in canning jars! ). There are jar swaps and classes and all kinds of fun stuff around here.
Yeah, my mom canned under pretty averse conditions. You do have to have a place to store the stuff. My mom used our house's old coal cellar. I have a fairly large pantry cupboard.

There are canning meetup groups around here.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 873,136 times
Reputation: 217
Can we kindly put this thread BACK ON TOPIC.

Quick definition:
Agrarian urbanism is a society involved with the growing of food
==============

And this is about Duany's book:
A new book by New Urbanist architect Andres Duany offers a blueprint for adding agriculture at all levels of development.
Robert Steuteville in his review says the book "presents a fascinating vision of a new real estate development tool..."

The book presents four models of agriculture-related urban planning, including methods to save existing farmland and ways to cultivate land within existing cities and suburbs.

Steutville writes that Duany isn't proposing we all go back to the land and raise our own food:

"While running an agrarian community would not be cheap, Duany says the expense and labor would be comparable to that of golf course communities, which employ greenskeepers. Beyond the golf course, master-planned communities spend a lot of money on landscaping. Redirect these funds toward food growing, add garden clubs and a CSA, shift some municipal landscaping dollars toward food-producing plants, attract avid gardeners and foodies as residents, and plug in food processing entrepreneurship - voila, there's agrarian urbanism."


Full Story: How to grow a Garden City
Published on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 in New Urban Network
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 873,136 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
Quick definition:
Agrarian urbanism is a society involved with the growing of food
Unpacking the definition / Similar phrases with different meanings:

Duany's book explains four models of agriculture-related Urban Planning.

+ Agricultural retention uses an array of techniques to save existing farms, including farmland trusts, greenbelts, and transfer of development rights.

+ Urban agriculture cultivates land within existing cities and suburbs, sometimes using parcels in depopulated sectors - ala Detroit's urban farms

+ Agricultural urbanism “refers to settlements equipped with a working farm... but few of the residents participate in the productive activities.” A number of modern developments — some new urban in design — fall into this category, including:
- Village Homes in Davis, California,
- Prairie Crossing outside Chicago,
- Serenbe near Atlanta, and
- New Town at St. Charles, Missouri.

Agrarian urbanism applies to settlements where “society is involved with food in all its aspects: organizing, growing, processing, distributing, cooking and eating it. … Agrarian urbanism is a complex pattern that transforms lawn-mowing, food-importing suburbanites into settlers whose hands, minds, surplus time and discretionary entertainment budgets are available for food production and its local consumption.” The concept is based on the English Garden City, Israeli kibbutz, 1960s commune, and US master-planned golf course community.

Duany describes a modern community with modern housing and middle class inhabitants who would not necessarily work in the farming or food processing business for a living. The agrarian activity would be the social center of the community — an amenity with health and environmental benefits.

/see: How to grow a Garden City | Better! Cities & Towns Online
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:40 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33075
^^
1. Who quit and made you mod? AFAIK, nei is still the mod here.

2. Canning is NOT off-topic when discussing gardening. You have to do something with the excess produce, and if you're talking about gardening on any scale, and particularly if you're talking about making all landscaping edible, which I read somewhere on CD, you're going to have a LOT of excess produce. What do you propose doing with it, Geologic?
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