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Old 02-26-2013, 07:59 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,581,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
Agreed to a point. I am uncertain if the costs of alternatively powered automobiles will be relatively inexpensive than gas-powered automobiles. And I think there will be a day when people will prefer other means of transport for a variety of reasons.

[and the dominance of the private automobile will fade]
People are always going to want a means of personal transportation. You can't put that genie back in the bottle.
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Old 02-26-2013, 07:59 PM
 
195 posts, read 235,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
ir city. Result: cars move fast, and pedestrians have to be very fast crossing the wide, wide streets. But even the car owners are not so happy, because they are not allowed to park on those wide streets - even though their is plenty of excess space which could be used for parking.

So in KC you see another sort of incovenience: Drives are made king, and even those who want to park are inconvenienced to permit rapid driving. I don't find this to be an attractive living arrangement. And I prefer a city like NYC which allows some parking, and often has cars moving at a slower speed.
If you think that was fast then you should probably come visit Houston or Austin sometime. Most of the streets have 40mph speed limits, Austin even has a highway with a 85mph speed limit. Also it seems like people have more than enough time to cross the street. The host was standing in the middle of the street for 30 seconds.

But I do agree that all those lanes are wasting space. I think the smartest thing to do would be to open up more on street parking zones.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hong Kong is much more humid than it typically gets in the Midwest during summer. Cold, obviously not.
Which explains a lot. A car in summer heat takes longer for the air conditioning to bring down the temp. than for the heat to bring it up in winter. You can roll down the window but you need high speed to cool off. Not as much protection from the elements in that kind of situation but could still off er a quicker trip depending on other factors.

Also in winter wind is a bad thing even with no heat it is better to be in a car than outside exposed.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:04 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
To clarify, I meant in the context of this thread because, of course, the urban core of many cities is threatened (was or still is depending on the location).

[i question if the that is the fault of the automobile and 'free' parking]
In a sense, yes. Without a car, it's difficult for a large city to decentralize. Inevitably, the downtown will always get the most transit service and be the most convenient location. Once you have an automobile, the convenience of centralization becomes an inconvenience too many cars going to one spot creates lots of traffic jams, hard to fit enough space to park all those cars. There were other factors besides the automobile, of course, but perhaps the automobile was a necessary factor.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hong Kong is much more humid than it typically gets in the Midwest during summer. Cold, obviously not.
There are some cold days here, but no snow.
But places like Beijing which get very cold are doing a massive build-out of their mass transit systems. And Tokyo (another cold place in the winter) has the world's most extensive mass transit system.

Chicago and Boston have systems that function well (mostly) in the winter
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Southern California
15,087 posts, read 17,563,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
People are always going to want a means of personal transportation. You can't put that genie back in the bottle.
Agreed.

[whether it will be the automobile is debatable]
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:09 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
Chicago and Boston have systems that function well (mostly) in the winter
Agreed. I don't think cold plays much of a factor in transit usage or walking for transportation. Lingering out on the street is another thing.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
In a sense, yes. Without a car, it's difficult for a large city to decentralize. Inevitably, the downtown will always get the most transit service and be the most convenient location. Once you have an automobile, the convenience of centralization becomes an inconvenience too many cars going to one spot creates lots of traffic jams, hard to fit enough space to park all those cars. There were other factors besides the automobile, of course, but perhaps the automobile was a necessary factor.
???
I don't get MIke's comment at all:
"the urban core of many cities is threatened..."

Everything I see suggests that the Suburbs are much more threatened than the Cities.
Why?
Because the energy requirement (per capita) of city-dwellers is much lower than it is for thsoe who live in the suburbs. JHK has called the American suburbs: "The greatest malinvestment in the history of mankind." (I paraphrase perhaps.)
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:16 PM
 
195 posts, read 235,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Which explains a lot. A car in summer heat takes longer for the air conditioning to bring down the temp. than for the heat to bring it up in winter. You can roll down the window but you need high speed to cool off. Not as much protection from the elements in that kind of situation but could still off er a quicker trip depending on other factors.

Also in winter wind is a bad thing even with no heat it is better to be in a car than outside exposed.
But its going to be very uncomfortable if you have to wait for a bus or walk a mile in a hot and humid climate. I think mass transit seems to be more prevalent in more moderate and colder climates (In general). I would rather walk a few blocks in a Chicago winter (wearing proper clothing) than in a Houston summer.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:20 PM
 
195 posts, read 235,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
Agreed.

[whether it will be the automobile is debatable]
Do you have any thoughts on what form of personal transport could replace the automobile? The only one i can think of is the bike, and I don't see that being a main form of transportation in American cities anytime soon.
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