U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-28-2013, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,074,613 times
Reputation: 12636

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
This, IMHO, is a big mistake !
Cul-de-sacs are another irrItating example of the waste and inefficiency of the suburbs.
They ONLY work for those in cars.



What conceit and perfect arrogance this design is!
They force people to walk in a much longer path, and even cars wind up burning more gasoline.
I would charge the extra costs against the Pensions of the idiots who designed them.
Simple: don't live there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-28-2013, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,453 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm glad Manhattan street parking is free. It's worth of every minute of my frustrating 25 minutes driving in circles to find it.*

Sometimes less than 25!
That surprises me that street parking is free in Manhattan, If I park for an hour on the street in the college town near me its near $1.50, not a big deal of course but it can add up.

Unfortunately, once there was a handicap sign behind the tree in front of a parking spot, I didn't see it... came back to my car and saw a ticket, I was like wtf lol. It was a $150 dollar ticket.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2013, 09:13 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
That surprises me that street parking is free in Manhattan, If I park for an hour on the street in the college town near me its near $1.50, not a big deal of course but it can add up.
The commercial streets (usually the north-south avenues) are metered and parking in many sections of places like Midtown time-limited but otherwise free. A lot of the free street parking is used by residents.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2013, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The commercial streets (usually the north-south avenues) are metered and parking in many sections of places like Midtown time-limited but otherwise free. A lot of the free street parking is used by residents.
A lot of streets formerly had metered parking up until 7 or 8pm, but are now metered until midnight. For example, I go into the city a lot of times at night either alone or with friends to grab some delicious Halal food from the "famous" cart on 53rd and 6th. The only time I didn't drive was Santa Con 2012, because I was drunk and in the city already by express bus. That being said, 6th Avenue on the right side between 52nd and 53rd was no parking Mon-Fri 7am-7pm (technically commercial only 7am-4pm, then a bus lane from 4pm-7pm) and the meters are only in effect until 7pm, and not in effect at all on the weekends. Nearby 52nd street used to be free after the commercial vehicle restriction was in place (Mon-Sat 7am-6pm), however now it's metered Mon-Sat 6pm-Midnight for everyone, and it's like close to $1.50 an hour. Still a relative bargain, and late night when I want my Halal fix, driving there (even with gas + $6 in tolls + minor parking fee) can take me 30 minutes from my house being able to sit comfortably the whole time and blast my music. Transit would take about an hour and a half, possibly more regardless of which way I went...each way. Yeah, I love my car even in NYC lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2013, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,602 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
That surprises me that street parking is free in Manhattan, If I park for an hour on the street in the college town near me its near $1.50, not a big deal of course but it can add up.

Unfortunately, once there was a handicap sign behind the tree in front of a parking spot, I didn't see it... came back to my car and saw a ticket, I was like wtf lol. It was a $150 dollar ticket.
To paraphrase M. above:

"There's a simple solution. Don't drive there."

M. actually said:
"Simple: don't live there."
As a reaction to my comment about disliking Cul de sacs.
Of course, I don't live there. The problem I have is that the drivers who do live there are needlessly burning up extra fuel, and ALSO (more importantly?) those who do live there are FORCED to drive, because biking and walking is too slow and too difficult, and buses would go there either.

If we add up all the extra gasoline burned up thanks to all the cul de sacs across the country, no doubt it adds up to a very big number of millions of gallons.

Here's a thoughtful young man concerned about what is happeniing to the environment:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAzTuttRm2Y

"We are ready to sacrifice... But someone has to call on us for this."

Let's put someone like Edward Norton in a leadership position to call for the necessary sacrifices, instead of yet another politician bought by big oil.

I am an older guy (than Norton) now, and I may be gone by the time this problem bites hardest, but I am still concerned for the people I will leave behind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2013, 08:07 AM
 
3,463 posts, read 4,539,930 times
Reputation: 7127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
. . . . . . > I am still concerned for the people I will leave behind.


I was on a citizens committee that fought developers in another state that was getting terrorized by irresponsible developers. It took a monumental effort to get an Amish man to come to a zoning meeting and offer his opinion on the rape of the land they had cared for for a century. Their(Amish) philosophy was that the land was a gift to them for the temporary time they were on the earth and it was a moral responsibility to give it back the same way they got it. It was moving to say the least!
Nu-Gen America's philosophy seems to be auto uber alles / destroy for 'convenience'.
" Convenianitize As much as we can and as quickly as possible!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

It seems Everyone is "inconvenienced" by the time it takes to get to WAL*MART. If you are going to miss all of your favorite shows due to traffic, you have wasted all that money you spent on the big screen.
A new road is in order
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2013, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,074,613 times
Reputation: 12636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
To paraphrase M. above:

"There's a simple solution. Don't drive there."

M. actually said:
"Simple: don't live there."
As a reaction to my comment about disliking Cul de sacs.
Of course, I don't live there. The problem I have is that the drivers who do live there are needlessly burning up extra fuel, and ALSO (more importantly?) those who do live there are FORCED to drive, because biking and walking is too slow and too difficult, and buses would go there either.

If we add up all the extra gasoline burned up thanks to all the cul de sacs across the country, no doubt it adds up to a very big number of millions of gallons.

Here's a thoughtful young man concerned about what is happeniing to the environment:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAzTuttRm2Y

"We are ready to sacrifice... But someone has to call on us for this."

Let's put someone like Edward Norton in a leadership position to call for the necessary sacrifices, instead of yet another politician bought by big oil.

I am an older guy (than Norton) now, and I may be gone by the time this problem bites hardest, but I am still concerned for the people I will leave behind.
The problem I have is that people relying on mass transit are needlessly wasting time which is a direct drain on our economy. The fact is people on public transit spend an extra 30 minutes each day commuting than their fellow citizens who drive a car. This represents a terrible drain on our wealth. The median personal income as reported to social security is $41,000 a year, at an hourly rate we'll call that $20/hour. Every person relying on transit could work an hour longer each day if they just lived like the average person who drove a car. Just from their own pockets, they're costing society $20 a day by selfishly choosing to use public transit instead of getting a car, or $5000 a year for every full-time worker. With 115 million full-time workers, that adds $575 billion dollars on lost productivity by using inferior public transportation.

It's also more wasteful of energy. Rather than focusing on light rail, which on average is worse than the average car, or buses, which or way worse, or even heavy rail, the only form of public transportation more energy efficient than the average private automobile in actual usage, we should put an emphasis on more fuel efficient automobiles. The Prius is more efficient than heavy rail. I suppose if you're an isolationist, we have coal to dig up here and natural gas to extract here, so using more energy to waste more time is preferable than engaging in trade. Being a capitalist, however, I'm fine with things like free trade and personal choice.

It's great that your concerned with what you're leaving behind, especially living in China which generally doesn't give a sh-- about what it leaves behind.
http://www.americanscientist.org/iss...de-emissions/3

Last edited by Malloric; 03-01-2013 at 09:02 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2013, 09:03 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,099,778 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
The problem I have is that people relying on mass transit are needlessly wasting time which is a direct drain on our economy. The fact is people on public transit spend an extra 30 minutes each day commuting than their fellow citizens who drive a car. This represents a terrible drain on our wealth. The median personal income as reported to social security is $41,000 a year, at an hourly rate we'll call that $20/hour. Every person relying on transit could work an hour longer each day if they just lived like the average person who drove a car. Just from their own pockets, they're costing society $20 a day by selfishly choosing to use public transit instead of getting a car, or $5000 a year for every full-time worker. With 115 million full-time workers, that adds $575 billion dollars on lost productivity by using inferior public transportation.
What say you about transit making a travel time more productive? Lots of Wifi going into transit vehicles, now. Can't really get a lot of work done while driving.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2013, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
Reputation: 32304
Default More absurdities

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
To paraphrase M. above:

"There's a simple solution. Don't drive there."

M. actually said:
"Simple: don't live there."
As a reaction to my comment about disliking Cul de sacs.
Of course, I don't live there. The problem I have is that the drivers who do live there are needlessly burning up extra fuel, and ALSO (more importantly?) those who do live there are FORCED to drive, because biking and walking is too slow and too difficult....
Will your absurdities never cease? The extra distance a person has to walk or bicycle to exit his cul de sac and get to a collector street (the latter normally being on a right-angle grid) is absolutely negligible. Are you talking about crippled people? I am 68 and I can walk 5 or 6 miles at a very brisk pace without any difficulty whatsoever. If I lived in a cul-de-sac it would have zero effect on whether or not I would choose to walk somewhere or bicycle somewhere. You seem to have no sense of the real world.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2013, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
What say you about transit making a travel time more productive? Lots of Wifi going into transit vehicles, now. Can't really get a lot of work done while driving.
As someone who's ridden and still does occasionally ride light rail at least part of the way to work, it's doubtful that my (or anyone elses) productivity can really be enhanced by that great of a margin by riding mass transit to commute instead of driving. I'd actually think that those who live about an hour or so commuter rail ride from the city would have an advantage, as they can usually get a comfortable seat and be able to actually do things...but from my experience and what I see, the majority of metropolitan transit commuters have to ride standing-room-only buses, subways and light rail trains for their commutes..even if you manage to get a seat, not exactly a very comfortable or productive environment. I suppose if you HAD to get something done quickly that you could do from your phone or web-enabled tablet, regardless of the crowd conditions you could get it done. Alternatively, I've had to do things immediately on my phone while I'm driving too, and it's no big deal to pull off the road or into a gas station momentarily to take care of business. So if I'm going to spend an hour on packed mass transit, barely comfortable enough to stand up and hold a handrail while the vehicle starts, stops, lurches, etc (yes trains do too), I'd rather just be comfortable in my car for less time and take care of it at home. For example, a 1 hour each way commute on a packed subway..sure you can try to type up emails on your phone with 4 people standing on top of you..or I can be in a suburban office park living nearby (my example of when I move to suburban Cincy) and have a 15 minute drive home, then have more time to spend at home and do whatever I want or need. Of course if you can ride mass transit quicker than driving, without crushing crowds and get a seat every time, I commend you and you may as well sprawl out and pop open the laptop lol. Good luck with that around NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top