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Old 03-24-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Out West
22,699 posts, read 16,808,575 times
Reputation: 26275

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderkat59 View Post
When I lived in Floridistan, I saw a few close in just a few years . . .

The internet ?
Not as much expendable cash for impulse purchases anymore ?
Traffic is finally bad enough to keep some people away ?

Heres to a quick and painful death to malls and the development companies who build them
Agreed. I hate the mall and think they are ugly monstrosities.

Why do I hate the mall?

People walk like they drive.
Getting there is a pain.
It's overload for me. I truly dislike malls. Too much going on, no character, I can stay home and buy what I need from the store, online, while sitting comfortably in my pajamas.
Did I mention I find them to be hideous eyesores? Yes, even the ones they try to make look nice.
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Old 03-24-2013, 05:55 PM
 
12,289 posts, read 15,184,803 times
Reputation: 8100
The "lifestyle center" is one answer, with close parking and fewer imposing stores. But they don't work as well in frigid climates.
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Old 03-25-2013, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,150,906 times
Reputation: 2341
Hi all--

There's three (used to be four) malls in this town. Of them, The Greene's doing brilliantly (it's adding another half a dozen stores this spring), Fairfield Commons is doing just fine, the Dayton Mall's going downhill (although still crowded, I just don't get a good vibe there, especially with the behavior of many patrons), and the Salem Mall closed years ago.

A bit sadly but truly, the only two successful malls are ones that are located beyond the geographical limits of RTA's service area.

If you asked around the community, this is why they say the Salem Mall closed.

Here's some more stink that gets raised when RTA tries to expand to the remaining malls.
Quote:
I say keep [RTA buses] out, ever since the nurse at the Dayton mall got murdered and thrown in a manhole on the west side of D and the bums spray painted her car and drove it for months. ...so keep the Malls and the Greene safe, our last hope for a nice place to relax. I don’t want no “pants on the ground, hats turned sideways” patrolling the food courts looking like they are all that
Quote:
The fact is the mall operators and the people who actually go to the mall to shop don’t want the bus stops. Let the hood rats stay in the hood. I don’t want to have to shop with a bunch of wanna bee gang bangers.
Quote:
Years ago my wife & I went to the Salem Mall. We were greeted by a very nice security guard who in the nicest way possible told us to leave as it wasn’t safe for two nice white folks to be in the mall. When questioned why, he said the black gangs were beating on people, especially whites. BUSING was the demise of the Salem Mall. Same started to happen to the Dayton Mall till they moved the stops.
And on and on

In short, crime kills malls - or more importantly, the perception of crime.



As for me personally, I don't mind the mall. I usually only go when I'm with friends, but I'm pretty sure that I get a couple mile's worth of walking in over the next two to three hours. And that's not a bad thing when the weather is as abysmal outside as it currently is.

I still prefer shopping in a brick and mortar store to buying something online, especially for clothes, because it's absolutely infuriating when I buy something in a size and it doesn't fit, given the difference of makes. Ordering online means sending it back or a trip to the nearest store to return it and get the correct size.
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Old 03-25-2013, 10:12 AM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,003,828 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Very well written, yet fact is you're making excuses for people. Something as simple and easy as walking from your car to a store has to somehow be made easier than it already is. I'm all about safety, and adding those pedestrians paths is a good idea, but not a requirement in my eyes.

I never said poor people were lazy, or students with poor grades were lazy, those areas encompass a lot more factors than walking to a mall from the parking lot, which is a lot less complicated.

Fact is, malls in struggling areas are struggling, malls in well to do areas are doing just fine. Some malls will evolve to survive as yes the online retail experience is cutting into their sales, but nothing beats going out and seeing the item in person and being able to handle it right before you buy it.

Additionally, almost all the malls I have seen with a movie theatre in them? Those theatres are pretty low class, small screen, and usually poorly managed. Maybe I haven't seen enough.
I brought up those groups of individuals because in the politics and education forums, as in this one, thinking of people as lazy is, for many, the first answer they settle on and is an immediate end to constructive conversation; it is both pervasive and exceedingly unhelpful.

It's not making excuses for people, but trying to understand why they do some things but not others. Why will people drive twenty minutes but not walk ten? Or why won't they cross a parking lot? Or walk along a busy boulevard?

Actually, it's pretty amazing what people will do when you change the set up in their favor. Locally, a good contrast is how few people will walk along city streets but how many will do so on the trails. What is it about the trail that encourages walking (and biking) that the city streets don't posses? Comfort. Users of the trails don't have to be especially vigilant because, on the trails, cars are driving by, much less within feet of you and going at 40 or 60 MPH. As a result, they are comfortable.

People avoid stressful situations. If the parking lot is stressful, most people won't cross it. And calling them lazy does nothing to change that.
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Old 03-25-2013, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,348 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
People avoid stressful situations. If the parking lot is stressful, most people won't cross it. And calling them lazy does nothing to change that.
I seriously don't believe most people give it much thought.
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Old 03-25-2013, 12:49 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,003,828 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
I seriously don't believe most people give it much thought.
You're right, but most such decisions aren't made consciously. The resultant "choice" is the sum of subtle subconscious reactions to context.
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Old 03-25-2013, 02:20 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,887,085 times
Reputation: 1290
Population, demographics, location repeat

Department stores like Macy's usually require 150,000 population with a 15 mile radius to support a 100,000 sq. ft. store.

Within that population you need enough of the age group and income group who will shop at that department store.

Finally, location, so that the mall is easy to get to and noticeable.

There is an outlet mall a couple minutes from my house which is always 100% occupied due to freeway location and tourists and locals who shop there.

20 minutes away is another mall which is close to 90% occupancy and is coming back from the grave. A brand new movie theater with the only Imax screen around, brand new remodeled common areas and food court, a skate park, batting cage and soccer training facility, and some new stores for the younger generation breathed new life into it. My only problem is that they are turning the old Mervyn's into a Fallas Discount Store. I'd prefer seeing it become Forever 21 o Burlington Coat Factory, but apparently it would cost too much money to remodel since it's a two story building.

I prefer going to the mall because it's busier, a more social experience from the food court to going to the movies, and I like the selection of clothes better.

I also read about one weird mall case. In fact, I don't consider it a mall anymore. County Fair Mall in Woodland is anchored by a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market, Burlington Coat Factory, JCPenney's, an alternative education school, Cinemark, and soon another discounter market. The inside of the mall has a bunch of low-priced locally owned stores. It's became more of an enclosed strip mall.

Malls anchored by Wal-Mart is never a good thing. There are 4 I know of and all of them are in low-income neighborhoods:

Bayshore Mall in Eureka (bad area for a mall, not enough population)
Panorama City Mall in LA (formally wealthier area that turned into a low income area)
Centerpoint Mall in Oxnard (formally wealthier area that turned into a low income area)
County Fair Mall in Woodland (formally wealthier area that turned into a low income area)

It will be interesting to see if these low income malls can survive the test of time.
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Old 03-25-2013, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,511 posts, read 9,047,067 times
Reputation: 5008
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Population, demographics, location repeat

Department stores like Macy's usually require 150,000 population with a 15 mile radius to support a 100,000 sq. ft. store.

Within that population you need enough of the age group and income group who will shop at that department store.

Finally, location, so that the mall is easy to get to and noticeable.

There is an outlet mall a couple minutes from my house which is always 100% occupied due to freeway location and tourists and locals who shop there.

20 minutes away is another mall which is close to 90% occupancy and is coming back from the grave. A brand new movie theater with the only Imax screen around, brand new remodeled common areas and food court, a skate park, batting cage and soccer training facility, and some new stores for the younger generation breathed new life into it. My only problem is that they are turning the old Mervyn's into a Fallas Discount Store. I'd prefer seeing it become Forever 21 o Burlington Coat Factory, but apparently it would cost too much money to remodel since it's a two story building.

I prefer going to the mall because it's busier, a more social experience from the food court to going to the movies, and I like the selection of clothes better.

I also read about one weird mall case. In fact, I don't consider it a mall anymore. County Fair Mall in Woodland is anchored by a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market, Burlington Coat Factory, JCPenney's, an alternative education school, Cinemark, and soon another discounter market. The inside of the mall has a bunch of low-priced locally owned stores. It's became more of an enclosed strip mall.

Malls anchored by Wal-Mart is never a good thing. There are 4 I know of and all of them are in low-income neighborhoods:

Bayshore Mall in Eureka (bad area for a mall, not enough population)
Panorama City Mall in LA (formally wealthier area that turned into a low income area)
Centerpoint Mall in Oxnard (formally wealthier area that turned into a low income area)
County Fair Mall in Woodland (formally wealthier area that turned into a low income area)

It will be interesting to see if these low income malls can survive the test of time.
Malls anchored by a Wal-Mart!? Wow! I thought it was odd when I saw a mall with a Target as an anchor store, but with a Wal-Mart you're just asking for low end businesses. The only real advantage to those malls is, believe it or not, Wal-Mart. I don't see many, actually, I haven't seen any Wal-Marts close up and become abandoned, so that mall will likely endure as long as the Wal-Mart remains. However, as long as Wal-Mart remains it will probably never do well either, the high end stores and most customers with more money will likely avoid the area and choose a better location.
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Old 03-25-2013, 05:46 PM
 
1,547 posts, read 2,350,611 times
Reputation: 435
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Malls anchored by a Wal-Mart!? Wow! I thought it was odd when I saw a mall with a Target as an anchor store, but with a Wal-Mart you're just asking for low end businesses. The only real advantage to those malls is, believe it or not, Wal-Mart. I don't see many, actually, I haven't seen any Wal-Marts close up and become abandoned, so that mall will likely endure as long as the Wal-Mart remains. However, as long as Wal-Mart remains it will probably never do well either, the high end stores and most customers with more money will likely avoid the area and choose a better location.
The Market Place at Factoria mall in Bellevue is anchored by a Target, Walmart,Safeway, TJ Max, Nordstrom Rack, Old Navy and Rite Aide Drugs. The mall used to have traditional anchors when they left they replaced them with more neighborhood type stores and the mall is doing really well. The name used to be Factoria Mall now its The Market Place at Factoria.
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Old 03-25-2013, 08:57 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,887,085 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironcouger View Post
The Market Place at Factoria mall in Bellevue is anchored by a Target, Walmart,Safeway, TJ Max, Nordstrom Rack, Old Navy and Rite Aide Drugs. The mall used to have traditional anchors when they left they replaced them with more neighborhood type stores and the mall is doing really well. The name used to be Factoria Mall now its The Market Place at Factoria.
Lifestyle centers with a Wal-Mart works:

Grossmont Center in La Mesa
Store Directory | General Content

Long Beach Towne Center
Long Beach Towne Center
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