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Old 09-08-2013, 03:54 PM
 
12,289 posts, read 15,181,947 times
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Some, but not all, is due to the weak economy. Failure to reinvest or reinvent themselves is the big issue. Lincoln Mall in Matteson IL a classic example. Good demographics but the owner has not put anything into it. A successful rebuilding is Randhurst in Mt Prospect IL.
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Old 09-09-2013, 05:26 AM
 
56,511 posts, read 80,803,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
Before picking over the corpses, let's also take a quick look at the more successful malls ...
Or at least the largest ones:


Top 10 Largest Malls In The U.S. - YouTube

Top 10 Largest Malls
=====
#1 : Mall of America : Bloomington, MN
#2 : Arizona Mills : Tempe, AZ
#3 : Rodeo Drive : Beverley Hills, CA
#4 : Macy's : New York City, NY
#5 : Fashion Show : Las Vegas, NV

#6 : South Coast Plaza : Coasta Mesa, CA
#7 : Sawgrass Mills, Sunrise, FL
#8 : Ala Moana Center : Honolulu, HA
#9 : The Gallery of Dallas : North Dallas, TX
10 : King of Prussia Mall : King of Prussia, PA
=====
I believe that DestinyUSA in Syracuse is the 6th biggest mall in the US.
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Old 09-10-2013, 01:09 PM
 
10,907 posts, read 9,316,798 times
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Point of order, the Macy's in NYC is a single store, not a mall.

Rodeo Drive is a city street, with separate stores along it. If you take that as a mall, what about the 5th and Madison Avenue shopping strips in Manhattan?

They seem to have a pretty expansive view of what a mall is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
Before picking over the corpses, let's also take a quick look at the more successful malls ...
Or at least the largest ones:


Top 10 Largest Malls In The U.S. - YouTube

Top 10 Largest Malls
=====
#1 : Mall of America : Bloomington, MN
#2 : Arizona Mills : Tempe, AZ
#3 : Rodeo Drive : Beverley Hills, CA
#4 : Macy's : New York City, NY
#5 : Fashion Show : Las Vegas, NV

#6 : South Coast Plaza : Coasta Mesa, CA
#7 : Sawgrass Mills, Sunrise, FL
#8 : Ala Moana Center : Honolulu, HA
#9 : The Gallery of Dallas : North Dallas, TX
10 : King of Prussia Mall : King of Prussia, PA
=====
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Old 09-11-2013, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,328,985 times
Reputation: 6670
Most likely because of internet purchases (which generally offer lower prices and an almost infinite variety). Many stores have shut down or suffered in recent years due to the recession.

Also, malls were once places for teenagers (especially young teenagers) to hang out. This sort of loitering probably did not generate much revenue on a per-hour basis, but it certainly was responsible for a lot of purchases, impulse and otherwise. With even pre-teens and young children having phones these days, you do not have to congregate in one physical location to "hang out" with your friends...you can do it from anywhere.
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Old 09-11-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,499,569 times
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Depending on the location of the dead mall, they can sometimes make great locations for new urban town centers that can help stimulate new job centers that pay better than the average retail job in a mall.
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Old 09-14-2013, 02:18 PM
 
3,934 posts, read 3,257,479 times
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I can't help but wonder if the general state of our economy isn't bringing a big question to the fore. After the boomers are gone will the consumer culture begin to die with them? I was in Arizona last winter and couldn't help but notice the geriatric populace being the only group supporting the entire notion of sun-land retirement. My children's generation won't be retiring with big dollars nor do they see a need to leave their northern homes in the way that AZ retirement was presented to my age group. As my generation grows older we just need less, less of everything. That means the upcoming generation will need to backfill the old consumer slots with new faces, but, these new faces don't have the $$$ of the previous generation not to mention the fact that when they are buying they aren't buying the same stuff that has been the backbone of the consumer buying craze. Change, it's the last thing we can really count on.......
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Old 09-19-2013, 10:09 PM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,935,865 times
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(1) Retail has become too homogeneous. Itís not the fault of the malls themselves, but thereís little to differentiate one from the other.
(2) The Internet has transformed the way people shop.
(3) Social media provides a different outlet for teenagers.
(4) Malls feel dated and a bit tacky, especially for the affluent and better-educated.
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Old 10-20-2013, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Mountain Home, ID
1,955 posts, read 3,009,490 times
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I can't help but view the prospect of dying malls with a little sadness. I grew up in a suburb in the Seattle/Tacoma area, where the mall literally was the downtown. When I was a kid, it was a big deal to go to the mall and walk around. There was always a wide variety of interesting things to see. We would start at one end and go up one side and down the other. The mall is still there and seems to be doing OK, but the foot traffic is nothing like I remember when I was a kid in the 80s.

My parents and brother still live in the area, and when I went to visit last Christmas they wanted to go up to a newer "open air lifestyle mall" built up around one of the Indian casinos north of Seattle. I must say whoever thought an open air mall in the Seattle area was a good idea was sorely mistaken. It rains eight months out of the year. It was pouring when we were there, and everywhere that wasn't paved was a sea of mud. Hands down the most miserable shopping experience I've ever had at a mall. I won't be back.
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Old 10-20-2013, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,499,569 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hesster View Post
I can't help but view the prospect of dying malls with a little sadness. I grew up in a suburb in the Seattle/Tacoma area, where the mall literally was the downtown. When I was a kid, it was a big deal to go to the mall and walk around. There was always a wide variety of interesting things to see. We would start at one end and go up one side and down the other. The mall is still there and seems to be doing OK, but the foot traffic is nothing like I remember when I was a kid in the 80s.

My parents and brother still live in the area, and when I went to visit last Christmas they wanted to go up to a newer "open air lifestyle mall" built up around one of the Indian casinos north of Seattle. I must say whoever thought an open air mall in the Seattle area was a good idea was sorely mistaken. It rains eight months out of the year. It was pouring when we were there, and everywhere that wasn't paved was a sea of mud. Hands down the most miserable shopping experience I've ever had at a mall. I won't be back.
Yeah, open air malls don't make much sense, though doing a cover over the pedestrian paths work.
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Old 10-20-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,473 posts, read 2,366,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bamba_boy View Post
I was recently in a new mall in Kuwait City. In actuality it's just a huge mall but they actually recreated small town America mainstreet by building a huge industrial shell with super-high maybe 60-70' high ceiling cleverly lit to make a blue-purple "sky" and the stores are not just plaster-walled cutouts of the building itself but are built as freestanding two-story brick buildings resembling a small-town MidWest downtown with one part typical American middle-classes clothing, eyeglass, sporting-good stores etc, another part with restaurants including verandas on the 2nd floor to watch the people walking below on the concrete "streets" (look like streets too, not like tiled mall floor). Then there is a sidestreet - kind of hidden - where the simple monochromatic flat "sky" is replaced by an ornate celestial half-dome with Fendi, Gucci, Chanel, etc etc arrayed around it in a two-story storefront resembling Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills.

I'm not sure you could do this in North America because the volume of air enclosed. Here you have to be A/C'd during 130d days in the Arabian Desert summer but we're sitting on the 2nd biggest oilfield in the world and gasoline is 80 cents per gallon. Natural gas prices have come down in the US though, maybe you could heat and A/C this type of mall OK. It's a pretty cool concept - kind of the best of both worlds. It actually creates a "walkable" (albeit "virtual") downtown and you can really get some good cardio excersize because the main street is nearly 2 kms long so if you make several laps you've done a mini-marathon! Great people-watching too with the mix of Westerners and Arabs and Indians and SE Asian guestworkers.
This is rather bizarre. Not the recreation of an outdoor environment indoors - which I've seen in Las Vegas. But why would an Arab culture choose to make it look like an American mainstreet (rather than "mainstreet" Kuwait)? Unless it was specifically designed and marketed as a "little America".
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