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Old 02-23-2015, 09:33 AM
 
1,915 posts, read 2,047,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPP1999 View Post
Yeah, stick it to those evil suburbanites who killed the cities in their quest for some open space and better schools. Evil they are, I tell ya.
Indeed. Sometimes the downright nasty element of these "urban planners" really comes out.
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Old 03-03-2015, 09:11 AM
 
40 posts, read 25,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
Indeed. Sometimes the downright nasty element of these "urban planners" really comes out.
But since then the suburbs have lost their 'squire' quality of having urban convenience and rural peace; the suburbs have become increasingly urban as they have aged. Old bungalows from shortly after WWII have been razed for apartment complexes that have poverty and crime -- and generate traffic jams.
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Old 07-30-2017, 01:46 PM
 
20,896 posts, read 39,157,087 times
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Default An Ode to Shopping Malls

Nice article in today's NY Times about a chap doing a youtube series on dying malls.

I admit to being stunned by the billions of dollars of construction materials, fixtures, etc, that may just be flattened by heavy equipment and hauled away. A stunning waste, so typical of our throwaway society, and I've no doubt we've paid for this in the goods we buy and the bankruptcies our banks have to eat.

My hopes are these structures can be reused as schools, medical, library, child/adult day cares, community, government and other facilities. Use of 'eminent domain' seems appropriate in some cases. Amazon or similar firms could use some of the larger stores as warehouse space from which they can pick, pack and send out items for local same/next day delivery.

There will always be a demand for movies and eateries and these places are good for that.

As selling consumer goods moves to the internet, malls can be reused for services; there's some of that going on with optical stores in malls, but why not legal offices, investment firms, tattoo parlors, realtors, dentists, barber shops, mani/pedi spas, fitness gyms, liquor stores, furniture / appliances, dinner theaters, and some amusements like bumper cars, billiards, shooting ranges. If enough critical mass can be built of these stores then a few retail shops could survive in malls.

But do we need 6+ shoe and 4+ jewelry stores per mall? That's the sort of overkill that is breeding the death of malls as our middle class with its disposable income continues to shrink in the global economy.
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Old 08-03-2017, 08:50 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,812,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I admit to being stunned by the billions of dollars of construction materials, fixtures, etc, that may just be flattened by heavy equipment and hauled away. A stunning waste, so typical of our throwaway society, and I've no doubt we've paid for this in the goods we buy and the bankruptcies our banks have to eat.
Anything of significant value will be salvaged.

Quote:
My hopes are these structures can be reused as schools, medical, library, child/adult day cares, community, government and other facilities.
I think you'll find that most of the dead malls are structures at end-of-life. They were never optimized for those purposes and maintenance on them has likely been put off as they were not profitable. In most cases it probably makes more sense to raze them and build a new structure.

Quote:
But do we need 6+ shoe and 4+ jewelry stores per mall? That's the sort of overkill that is breeding the death of malls as our middle class with its disposable income continues to shrink in the global economy.
The King of Prussia Mall, one of the malls that's still going strong, once (and may still) had 4 jewelry stores at one intersection, one of them being Cartier. What malls need is what is profitable. Jewelry is one of those things a lot of people want to examine before they buy, so retail can thrive even in an Internet world. Same for shoes.
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Old 08-09-2017, 02:27 AM
 
Location: my little town
1,179 posts, read 404,435 times
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When I'm shopping on a bike, I want to see bike racks near the doors of stores where I plan to shop. From a car, walking across an acre of parking then an acre of mall, then the same distance again going back, would not be a pleasant shopping experience.
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Old 08-10-2017, 09:57 AM
 
4,406 posts, read 4,059,151 times
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Id stay stop building more malls and just focus on the current ones and make them nicer. That is usually what kills a nice mall, is a newer bigger one is built a 15 minute drive away and that spells the end of that mall. Seen in happen to atleast 3 malls here in metro ATL
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Old 02-12-2018, 09:06 AM
 
6,056 posts, read 10,837,768 times
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Blame Amazon company’s own monopoly on customers. First solid price rewards along modernity then ending up victims to comforts of convenience. Rather buy everything at stores outside before I search online at their own digital Database records inventory. Additional factor is continually increasing expensive landscapes for renting. Mass consumption is having to stay collectively conscious on ethical. Prioritize your own desires of what you want to spend money on that is giving back correctly to society.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:57 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
11,584 posts, read 3,963,981 times
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Some shopping centre groups seem to do better than others, for instance Westfield which has shopping centres in the US, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Brazil seem to be doing well and are expanding many of their operations, indeed they were recently acquired by French property group Unibail-Rodamco.

Europe's biggest mall owner buys Westfield for $25bn | Business | The Guardian

Will Unibail-Rodamco Give US Westfield Malls A European Makeover - Forbes

Whilst Hammersons seems to become ever bigger and a major international player and the recent acquisition of Intu has further consolidated their position.

Shopping centres sold in £3.4bn deal - BBC News

Part of the problem in the US is that there are just too many out of town shopping centres, indeed European Malls often tend to be part of cities or very close to major cities and have good public transport links as well as road links, so they have a close proximity to a good demographic and hinterland. There are also generaly a lot less Malls outside of the US.

The other problem has been the rise of internet shopping and changing consumer habits, however when a Mall is easy to get to by public transport and is part of a city it can still attract shoppers looking for a retail and leisure experience, rather than just shopping on line. More leisure facilities, cinemas, sporting facilities, good restaurants and cafes etc can also entice people back to some malls.

There will however most likely be a lot fewer malls in the US in the future, as there are far too many to viable in the modern age with changing conumer habits and patterns, and quality of the shopping experience is now more important than simply the quantity of malls.

Last edited by Brave New World; 02-13-2018 at 04:44 AM..
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:19 AM
 
1,246 posts, read 565,062 times
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I find malls just too big. The newest one in my area can take 10 minutes to walk fast from one end to the other. And it is hard to get a parking space

They should make the malls housing. That is what we need.
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
597 posts, read 352,413 times
Reputation: 885
Westfield does not seem to have too many problems here. The big department stores do, but Westfield seem to keep increasing the restaurants and food outlets, number of cinemas and service places like nail shops and beauticians, banks and medical fund outlets etc. They still seem to be busy renovating many of the older malls. I avoid Westfield if I can but they are very busy.
I could be wrong but I did not recall any malls in Sydney closing.
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