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Old 03-07-2013, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
Reputation: 661

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
I think one issue in exurban areas is that people are too lazy to park and walk around to more than one store - the big box power centers involve less walking per store, and if someone wants to go to another store I've seen folks get back in their cars and drive down the row to go to the next store. Even if tht doesn't reduce walking distance overall it surely reduces the chances for encounters with snotty kids.
How is this even a reasonable statement, that people are too lazy to walk around multiple different stores, so that they go to a big box store or a power center because they're too lazy to walk around? First of all, those stores are huge and have a large selection under one roof, excuse people for liking the convenience of having this available. What's the difference if I'm able to get my shopping done quickly in one or two stores next to each other, versus having to walk for blocks around a lot of urban neighborhoods (with bags most likely) outside in the elements? It's a lot easier for many to just be able to drive to one big store and take care of business. Most people (including myself) view need-shopping as a chore, and if I can get it all done under one roof and take all of the stuff back to my house with my car, it's much easier than having to walk around for a half hour to different stores, likely paying more money and wasting more time. I didn't know that because people don't feel like spending more time in a "walkable" shopping area that it constitutes them as being lazy, people have better things to do with their time. And if we're going to go with such an irrational statement as people in car-centric areas being lazy, I could just as easily say that people who want to live in a mixed-use building upstairs from retail shops are just as lazy, so that they can just take an elevator downstairs and do their shopping without having to walk far distances.

In terms of driving from one area of the parking lot to the next, sometimes people do that because they're lazy, or it's raining, or they can't leave their car in one lot because it'll get towed. It all depends on the situation. I personally find strip malls convenient because I can find an easy, free spot and walk to all of the stores next to each other that I need to go to. If it's a big box power center, and I'm at the supermarket with a lot of bags, I'll bring them back to the car and depending on how close the other big box store is that I want to go to, or depending on how much I want to buy from that store, I'll either leave it and walk over or move the car closer: whichever will save me the most amount of time and effort, simply because I have better things to be doing then walking around shopping all day.
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,817,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
If I read one more comment about suburban people being lazy, I'm going to scream online.
While I agree with you about the laziness stereotypes -- and the need to park near the grocery store or the hardware store when you're buying tons of stuff -- I also agree with ki0eh that it's certainly not uncommon for people to drive from one end of the strip mall to the other even if they're not carrying any heavy or bulky parcels.

I don't think it's all that uncommon in enclosed malls, either, especially the bigger ones.

The closest big box mecca to me has kind of an E shape, and the stores on the branches of the E are detached from the long row of stores by a parking lot about the length of about a football field, and a two-lane road. There are no sidewalks except those that abut the storefronts, so walking from DSW to Target often involves taking your life into your hands.

Quote:
Why are you watching people like that anyway? It sounds like the people on politics, who are always watching what other people put into their grocery carts if they're buying with food stamps. Creepy!
LOL! Don't you wish you had that kind of time?
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:50 AM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,713,753 times
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There certainly would be a lot of walking around inside a big box but the perception (among the lazy, not the infirm who have more direct ways of measuring) might be that one is taking a long walk to a compact store that seems longer than a shorter walk to the store and then "shopping" inside the big box.
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Old 03-07-2013, 12:17 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
While I agree with you about the laziness stereotypes -- and the need to park near the grocery store or the hardware store when you're buying tons of stuff -- I also agree with ki0eh that it's certainly not uncommon for people to drive from one end of the strip mall to the other even if they're not carrying any heavy or bulky parcels.

I don't think it's all that uncommon in enclosed malls, either, especially the bigger ones.


The closest big box mecca to me has kind of an E shape, and the stores on the branches of the E are detached from the long row of stores by a parking lot about the length of about a football field, and a two-lane road. There are no sidewalks except those that abut the storefronts, so walking from DSW to Target often involves taking your life into your hands.


LOL! Don't you wish you had that kind of time?
I have actually done the former myself. Part of my rationale is that if I'm going to leave from the second store, I might as well be fairly close to it. Not so much at strip malls, which out here tend not to be large, but at these "marketplace" type places that are like big strip malls. Take a look at this map. If I'm going from Costco to Target, I'll move the car.
https://plus.google.com/114809593567...ut?gl=us&hl=en

At the enclosed mall, I'll sometimes take something bulky out to my car and come back, rather than move the car.

Yes, I could use a little more time in my day, but I'd probably just waste it here on CD!
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Old 03-07-2013, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I have actually done the former myself. Part of my rationale is that if I'm going to leave from the second store, I might as well be fairly close to it. Not so much at strip malls, which out here tend not to be large, but at these "marketplace" type places that are like big strip malls. Take a look at this map. If I'm going from Costco to Target, I'll move the car.
https://plus.google.com/114809593567...ut?gl=us&hl=en

At the enclosed mall, I'll sometimes take something bulky out to my car and come back, rather than move the car.
Couldn't agree more, pretty much exactly what I was replying as well. It's a choice I'll make depending upon how much stuff I have, the weather, how far away the other store is, etc. Not really something I think too much about, I don't think many people do. It's weird to think that somebody on an internet forum is so concerned with the way people go shopping, lol.

BTW, I like the area of the shopping plaza you've posted, and that looks like a really clean, classy and convenient place to shop. I've been researching places that I'd like to relocate to in the next couple of years, and suburban Denver areas like that are pretty high on my list. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 03-07-2013, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
There certainly would be a lot of walking around inside a big box but the perception (among the lazy, not the infirm who have more direct ways of measuring) might be that one is taking a long walk to a compact store that seems longer than a shorter walk to the store and then "shopping" inside the big box.
Why would I want to take a longer walk to go shopping when I can have the store conveniently set up with abundant parking outside, take care of my needs under one roof and then leave? What is this obsession with wanting people to walk to all of their shopping? I can go to a park, boardwalk or small town/city and walk around for hours when I'm in the mood to walk for leisure or exercise, when I want to take care of shopping, I want it to be over as quickly as possible and not spend 20 minutes walking somewhere.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:05 PM
 
281 posts, read 631,920 times
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Even in mild San Diego I did not like all the LIFESTYLE CENTERS because the weather was about 50 degrees in the evening and even in the Spring and Fall it is chilly. When I move from store to store I like it 72 degrees.

So if the weather hurts the appeal of a LIFESTYTLE CENTER in San Diego it really hurts them in cities with lousy weather most of the year.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,219 posts, read 17,954,379 times
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In order for a mall to succeed, it helps if a) it has something that makes it a destination, b) it's located in an area with a high aggregate income, and c) it doesn't have much competition nearby. The more those factors are true, the more likely a mall is to succeed. In the Pittsburgh area, witness the diverging fortunes of Ross Park Mall and Century III Mall. Ross Park Mall is located in Pittsburgh's wealthy northern suburbs, and it has several high-end stores not found at any other mall in the Pittsburgh area, such as Nordstrom. These exclusive stores make it a destination not only for the northern suburbs, but also for much of western Pennsylvania. And the nearest mall is the Mall at Robinson, which is over 10 miles away, and not convenient to the I-279/U.S. 19 corridor.

Conversely, Century III Mall is located in Pittsburgh's southern suburbs, not far from the Monongahela River Valley, and none of its stores are exclusive. Making matters worse is that its market is being squeezed by South Hills Village and The Waterfront. Both of those malls are located within five or six miles of Century III Mall, and they siphon off most of the high-income consumers as well, since South Hills Village is located among a small cluster of wealthy southwestern suburbs along U.S. 19, and The Waterfront is just across the Monongahela River from Pittsburgh's rapidly-gentrifying East End. This leaves Century III mall with the depressed Monongahela River Valley and the older working-class southeastern suburbs along PA 51 as its market.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,817,368 times
Reputation: 54016
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I have actually done the former myself. Part of my rationale is that if I'm going to leave from the second store, I might as well be fairly close to it. Not so much at strip malls, which out here tend not to be large, but at these "marketplace" type places that are like big strip malls.
Oh, heck yeah. I'm not going to park even in the middle of the shopping center if I'm going to PetsMart at one end and the grocery store at the other. Lugging 40 pounds of cat litter and 18 pounds of cat food across the parking lot of rather dangerous -- especially for my shoulders!

Last edited by nei; 03-07-2013 at 03:27 PM.. Reason: edit response to deleted post
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Old 03-07-2013, 03:28 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Oh, heck yeah. I'm not going to park even in the middle of the shopping center if I'm going to PetsMart at one end and the grocery store at the other. Lugging 40 pounds of cat litter and 18 pounds of cat food across the parking lot of rather dangerous -- especially for my shoulders!
c'mon don't you want a workout? More seriously a cart could also solve that problem.
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