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Old 03-04-2013, 09:50 PM
 
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I've been reading more and more about this term "greyfield" redevelopment, which means redeveloping old strip malls or corridors of auto-oriented use (commonly in 1st ring suburbs) into transit friendly higher density development that creates a sense of place. Does anyone know some good examples of greyfields that have had a lot of success with redevelopment? Also does anyone know if there is any best management practices out there for greyfield redevelopment, or is this concept too new?
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:34 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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The only thing I can think of is the Northgate mall area of Seattle. Former parking lots were used to make new walkable retail, new condos, and a major transit hub.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Does anyone know some good examples of greyfields that have had a lot of success with redevelopment? Also does anyone know if there is any best management practices out there for greyfield redevelopment, or is this concept too new
The entire island of Manhattan? Large pieces of SF? Greyfield redevelopment is not new. Any city or area that has reached its growth boundaries has torn down old SFH or retail to build more dense developments. Vancouver, SF, NYC, LA, heck even Dallas the king of sprawl has reached its growth boundaries and most of its new development involves first tearing down existing retail or homes for added density.

Generally, the majority of development from 1950 - 2000 or so was designed to be most friendly to autos, and redevelopment of properties built since then tends to be more friendly to mass transit.

What is new is 'transit oriented development' which basically involves building a mass transit system not around the current most dense area of the city, but rather where rail rightaways already exist (due to $$$) and then upzoning the areas around the stations with dense development. LA and DFW and other cities are doing this - with mixed amounts of success. I'm sure there is a list of TOD best practices.

Last edited by TheOverdog; 03-05-2013 at 12:08 PM..
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Los Angeles has a wide range of excellent examples of greyfield development.

Off the top of my head (and in Hollywood alone) I can think of the "Carls Jr Killer" on La Brea replacing a drive-thru fast food place; the "Jons Supermarket Killer" replacing a grocery store with a large parking lot; BLVD 6200 replacing a bunch of empty parking lots and a derelict nightclub. These three are all going to be mixed use buildings that generally look something like this: hollywood, ca - Google Maps

Basically anything that is built in the city of Los Angeles at this point is going to be greyfield development.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,107,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
The entire island of Manhattan? Large pieces of SF? Greyfield redevelopment is not new. Any city or area that has reached its growth boundaries has torn down old SFH or retail to build more dense developments. Vancouver, SF, NYC, LA, heck even Dallas the king of sprawl has reached its growth boundaries and most of its new development involves first tearing down existing retail or homes for added density.

Generally, the majority of development from 1950 - 2000 or so was designed to be most friendly to autos, and redevelopment of properties built since then tends to be more friendly to mass transit.

What is new is 'transit oriented development' which basically involves building a mass transit system not around the current most dense area of the city, but rather where rail rightaways already exist (due to $$$) and then upzoning the areas around the stations with dense development. LA and DFW and other cities are doing this - with mixed amounts of success. I'm sure there is a list of TOD best practices.
Los Angeles has been doing "greyfield" building for decades now - most people don't realize it but the majority of the residential buildings in LA are multi-family. The city was not built this way, it infilled to its current density levels, which are higher than many would imagine considering LA's reputation for low-density.
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Old 03-05-2013, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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Troy, Michigan has plans for 'greyfield' type development. The only limiting factor is the economy. They pretty much are getting the zoning changes in place and incorporating it into the city's master plan.

City of Troy, MI > Big Beaver Corridor Study

Maps and plans: Big Beaver Corridor Study - City of Troy - Birchler Arroyo Associates, Inc.
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Old 03-05-2013, 05:22 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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SouthSide Works - Pittsburgh Area Shopping Malls

The above mall in Pittsburgh is on the site of a former steel mill.
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:43 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
SouthSide Works - Pittsburgh Area Shopping Malls

The above mall in Pittsburgh is on the site of a former steel mill.
I think that's more of an example of brownfield redevelopment.

Brownfield land - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I can think of lots of projects in Baltimore that fall into that category.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:14 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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So what's the difference between "greyfield" and "brownfield"?
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:19 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,101,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
So what's the difference between "greyfield" and "brownfield"?
Greyfield is building on parking lot. Brownfield is building on former industrial land.

The type the OP is talking about is redeveloping a space to be less auto dominant. The example I gave used some of its surplus parking to build apartments, condos and new stores that are oriented to the street, and not the center of the parking lot.
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