U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-07-2013, 02:42 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,006,214 times
Reputation: 1348

Advertisements

http://Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA -- in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

Cities would hate this on a large scale--too many risks of becoming responsible, financially and legally, for poorly planned or abandoned guerrilla gardens. But, it's nice to see positive bottom-up development where the top-down approach has been applied ham-handedly and failed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-07-2013, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,481 posts, read 5,149,433 times
Reputation: 3548
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
http://Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA -- in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

Cities would hate this on a large scale--too many risks of becoming responsible, financially and legally, for poorly planned or abandoned guerrilla gardens. But, it's nice to see positive bottom-up development where the top-down approach has been applied ham-handedly and failed.
Great video. I went last week to hear Andres Duany talk about Agrarian Urbanism. Projects like this were central to his discussion.

After he presented via Skype, a local organizer of a community garden program spoke about local programs taking place in low-income housing areas. She stated something that was hard to believe but was related to what the speaker in this video said as well. Young people need to learn about vegetables and touch them and and then they will eat them. She said kids and even many adults had never seen vegetables on the plants. Some didn't believe you could eat them since everything they ate was processed. It took her two years just to get people to see that these vegetables were food and to show them how to cook and use them before they could even work on the growing aspect of the program.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2013, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,118,020 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
http://Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA -- in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

Cities would hate this on a large scale--too many risks of becoming responsible, financially and legally, for poorly planned or abandoned guerrilla gardens. But, it's nice to see positive bottom-up development where the top-down approach has been applied ham-handedly and failed.
I got beets from a farm in South Central just a couple weeks ago at the Hollywood Farmer's Market. Didn't realize where they were from until we had already purchased them. All in all pretty good and cheap.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2013, 08:00 PM
 
2,881 posts, read 4,618,763 times
Reputation: 3584
The story of the original South Central Farm went on for years and years, a figuratively organic enterprise. This is a guerrilla response to its first demise. The farm started in '94 and thrived, the biggest in the country, until the parcel got bought out for Forever 21 to build a factory. It was bulldozed. Big story back in '06. The real social story for me is this was a thriving enterprise. However, it mostly was created by and served Latinos with no political clout, its being a massive community resource notwithstanding. I recall there were water issues, though, and soil testing should have been done as a common caution.

Still, bulldozed. Demolished.

And Forever 21 never did build their factory.

Funny how now that urban gardening is mainstream, not just some activity "those" people are up to, that it's enjoying all kinds of popular support. South Central Community Garden existed just 9 years too soon to catch this wave. It should be an almost two-decade institution by now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2013, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,481 posts, read 5,149,433 times
Reputation: 3548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunjee View Post
The story of the original South Central Farm went on for years and years, a figuratively organic enterprise. This is a guerrilla response to its first demise. The farm started in '94 and thrived, the biggest in the country, until the parcel got bought out for Forever 21 to build a factory. It was bulldozed. Big story back in '06. The real social story for me is this was a thriving enterprise. However, it mostly was created by and served Latinos with no political clout, its being a massive community resource notwithstanding. I recall there were water issues, though, and soil testing should have been done as a common caution.

Still, bulldozed. Demolished.

And Forever 21 never did build their factory.

Funny how now that urban gardening is mainstream, not just some activity "those" people are up to, that it's enjoying all kinds of popular support. South Central Community Garden existed just 9 years too soon to catch this wave. It should be an almost two-decade institution by now.
Better late than never. The man in the video is very charismatic and likely very effective in getting the young kids to buy in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top