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Old 03-08-2013, 06:46 AM
 
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All four of these cities provide an amazing view of their CBD's from far away, but they developed differently for reason's such as lakes or the ocean or a lack of land like an island. Miami and Chicago developed the most intensely along the lake and ocean. San Fran and Manhattan are islands so they developed with constrained land. Which style is best to emulate if you were to start a CBD from scratch?

I assume NIMBY's would be easier to deal with if you built the Chicago and Miami version since it would have the least effect on the surrounding neighborhoods. If a city is thinking or planning to build a brand new CBD that will affect views in the city, what should the city choose? Build in the neighborhoods or build along the shore lines? Which is a better style of development, San Fran/Manhattan island style or Miami/Chicago linear style? Which looks better?
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Old 03-08-2013, 06:55 AM
 
Location: The City
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Are Chicago and Miami linear in CBD or residential?
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Are Chicago and Miami linear in CBD or residential?

It may be residential. I was basically focusing on their development styles. Miami and Chicago mainly run along the coast. It probably is more residential as you move up the coast.
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:34 AM
 
Location: The City
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Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
It may be residential. I was basically focusing on their development styles. Miami and Chicago mainly run along the coast. It probably is more residential as you move up the coast.

But the reasons why are different, Miami and Chicago build the highrises for residential mostly to take advantage of the water views

SF and NYC are limited moreso because of the geography

most traditional CBDs are not linear, a few exceptions are more in newer multi-modal areas

Even Chicago and Miami in their CBD are less linear. The loop is bascially a rectangle for example
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:45 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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The reason Chicago and Miami can build high above the water like that, is because they are "flat" and don't necessarily block anybody elses view very often. In SF, this changes, and a building going up can quite easily block somebody elses "view" therefore bringing their property value down. Miami is more linear than Chicago though, for sure. Chicago is dense going back as well it's just not built as high. Manhattan is dense everywhere with concentrated high rises anywhere and everywhere. The CBD of Chicago is basically a square or rectangle, it's about about 2 miles across also...
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
But the reasons why are different, Miami and Chicago build the highrises for residential mostly to take advantage of the water views

SF and NYC are limited moreso because of the geography

most traditional CBDs are not linear, a few exceptions are more in newer multi-modal areas

Even Chicago and Miami in their CBD are less linear. The loop is bascially a rectangle for example

You're probably right. I thought it had more to do with Nimby's but I guess not. Which style do you like better? This style is being considered here in D.C. and I imagine it would look very similar to Miami. I wonder how appealing an urban neighborhood built in that style can be? Is there anybody on here that lives in Miami in one of those highrises? What is the lifestyle like? Does it feel isolated being right on the water from the rest of the city?
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:55 AM
 
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Originally Posted by grapico View Post
The reason Chicago and Miami can build high above the water like that, is because they are "flat" and don't necessarily block anybody elses view very often. In SF, this changes, and a building going up can quite easily block somebody elses "view" therefore bringing their property value down. Miami is more linear than Chicago though, for sure. Chicago is dense going back as well it's just not built as high. Manhattan is dense everywhere with concentrated high rises anywhere and everywhere. The CBD of Chicago is basically a square or rectangle, it's about about 2 miles across also...

Yes, I know the loop area is a rectangle. I was mainly talking about the skyline development along the coast. How it hugs the coast. I was wondering what it is like to live in those neighborhoods away from the loop where the development changes rapidly to lower density lowrise development from highrise development.
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:57 AM
 
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I'm pretty sure most high rises in Chicago's CBD are not residential.
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:04 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Yes, I know the loop area is a rectangle. I was mainly talking about the skyline development along the coast. How it hugs the coast. I was wondering what it is like to live in those neighborhoods away from the loop where the development changes rapidly to lower density lowrise development from highrise development.
I've lived near the lake, it's fine... but it's nothing like Miami... Miami street level is really spaced out and not very pedestrian friendly.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:02 AM
 
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San Francisco is not an island. What the hell are you talking about?
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