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Old 03-13-2013, 01:35 PM
 
Location: The City
22,345 posts, read 32,226,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I've seen worse ... and so have you. That little block looks relatively clean, and I didn't see too many boarded-up windows.

Yes there are absolutely worse but this block still appears non decimated, potentially still almost market grade. The boarded up blocks are not

All cities have awful streets, maybe Philly with more than most
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:35 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,089,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post

Kind of reminds me of Hell's Kitchen in Manhattan.
I find it surprising how something so pleasant looking can exist that close to Times Square. Not saying it's my ideal, but I find it a nice looking street.
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I've seen worse ... and so have you. That little block looks relatively clean, and I didn't see too many boarded-up windows.
I would agree---these Philly rowhomes, while generally unimpressive, are still intact, and not visibly damaged, although there's certainly not much of the way in grass/trees on this street..

Other Philly rowhome neighborhoods are in MUCH worse shape...
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:29 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
I would agree---these Philly rowhomes, while generally unimpressive, are still intact, and not visibly damaged, although there's certainly not much of the way in grass/trees on this street..

Other Philly rowhome neighborhoods are in MUCH worse shape...
And even more in far better shape
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 408,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Just one point on the nabe you posted (the your type). I would never do a split level of which most of that neighborhood looks like. Mostly built in the 60's and 70's but can completely understand understand someone who wants space/yard no doubt
Yeah I'm not crazy about split level myself, mainly getting at the density and layout of the 'hood. I wouldn't mind owning a "McMansion" after a couple of years too, actually...the tough part will be finding one without a crazy HOA..or no HOA at all, lol.
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 408,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I find it surprising how something so pleasant looking can exist that close to Times Square. Not saying it's my ideal, but I find it a nice looking street.
Agreed, it's always confused me growing up as we used to park our car in that neighborhood at night on the street all the time when we went to be all "touristy" in the Times Square area..street parking is actually surprisingly not that hard in that area, even today.

And the weirdest thing is just how quiet and calm those blocks are late at night, I've spent plenty of late nights drunkenly walking back to the subway or to catch a cab down some of those streets, downright creepy sometimes...
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Old 03-13-2013, 04:53 PM
 
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Super interesting thread from a Californian's perspective. Thanks for all the interesting examples. Interestingly, the only rowhouses I see out here, are not true row houses (no shared walls) and are used in infill. Pretty pricey as well. (This subdivision sat in roughly this state for several years of housing bubble aftermath, but is heading towards full build out.)
21st and t st, sacramento - Google Maps
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Old 03-16-2013, 09:49 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,841,400 times
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per the OP....
Fugly!
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Old 03-16-2013, 11:05 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,902,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
I'd imagine this community was built in the early 50s for minorities who were excluded from places like Levittown.
No, as another poster pointed out, the far Northeast was lily-white at its inception, and stayed that way well into the '80s. It's more diverse now, but even today, it's home to many of the most Caucasian neighborhoods in the city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
[...] Or, for lower-middle whites, who left for newer suburbs in the late 60s and 70s.
This is more correct. The upper working/lower middle class whites flocked to the newer twins/airlite houses. Middle (and to an extent even upper middle) class whites moved to sparkling subdivisons filled with splits and ranches. At the time, the "Great Northeast" was a modern, less congested alternative to Philadelphia's traditional city neighborhoods. It really was "the bee's knees" if you had a little bit of money but not a whole lot. You got fresh air and a bigger house with a garage and a lawn. There were (and to an extent still are) noticeable Jewish, Irish, Polish, German, Italian, etc. enclaves that moved in from Lower Northeast/North/South Philadelphia in search of a suburban-esque lifestyle at a relatively affordable price. In many instances, these became the new go-to "white ethnic neighborhoods," and for a while, the sense of community remained just as strong. The Far Northeast became known as "the concrete suburb" for good reason.

Over half of my family lived in the Northeast at one point or another. Among other relatives, My dad's family hopped around Rhawnhurst and Bustleton before moving to Elkins Park in the early '70s. My second cousin grew up in Pine Valley in the '80s and '90s (the "pinnacle" of the Far Northeast, featuring developments that strongly resembled the more cookie-cutter portions of Abington and Lower Moreland Townships) and her family remained there until 2005, when they downsized to a 55+ community in Bucks County.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
Looks like mid-century housing junk.
It reminds me of a lot of housing projects.
It definitely hasn't aged well, and as a modern person of means, I have no interest living there either. But it once served (and in many ways, still serves) a very valuable purpose. Many people are still proud to call it home, including newer residents of color who were pretty much absent during the area's "peak."

Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
It does show a lack of imagination for Philly housing styles, though. With the opportunity to expand into the countryside, what do Philly builders do? Construct ...MORE ROWHOUSES!!

How about a little space to breathe in?
Comparatively speaking, this was breathing room. And while these homes aren't architectural marvels, many other parts of Philadelphia, such as Rittenhouse, East Falls, Society Hill, Mt. Airy, etc. etc. etc. are overflowing with absolutely gorgeous residential and commercial infrastructure, both detached and multi-unit alike. Cookie-cutter housing (whether multi-unit rows most urbanists find "charming" or detached single-family homes they would consider "offensive") is relatively cheap and easy to build--really the only way to accommodate the burgeoning mass of veterans, armed with the GI bill and yearning to start a family somewhere fresh and new.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
There also plenty of Philly suburbs that aren't row houses. Those Philly examples by the OP aren't very appealing looking, but I don't object to the lack of space, or think it as an obvious plus, just a personal preference.
This is true (although the row houses you'll find in the wealthy parts of Center City are nothing to sneeze at). Also, many of Philadelphia's "true" suburbs (outside the city limits) are among the best in the nation. The Main Line, Lower Old York Road region, Moorestown/The Haddons, etc. etc. provide both cute, historic, walkable village centers with mom-and-pop bars, restaurants, and shops (and adjacent pre-war housing stock) and somewhat newer, more autocentric (but not at all "soulless and sprawling") leafy green residential enclaves where charming custom construction is the rule and not the exception.

Last edited by ElijahAstin; 03-16-2013 at 11:13 PM..
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Old 03-17-2013, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
3,853 posts, read 7,654,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
There actually used to be a streetcar which ran up and down this street as well, early TOD? It's been replaced by the MTA S61 bus.
Plus a lot more routes. You have the S54 down Manor Road, and the S61/62/66/91/92, and X12/42 down Victory.

I did a quick record check, and those homes were built around 1940-1950.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
The Port Richmond area did eventually try and morph into a "modern" car oriented shopping area, while still trying to maintain some of it's old scale as can be seen here, however it has been eclipsed by the other three big shopping areas: New Springville, New Dorp shopping area, and since the mid 90's, the Charleston/Richmond Valley area.
Generally, further west along Forest Avenue is more car-oriented. If you go east towards West Brighton (Broadway, Bement, etc), it becomes more walkable, similar to New Dorp.
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