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Old 03-11-2013, 04:12 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
US culture and history won't allow any one city to dominate. US society is just too decentralized and is skeptical of centralization, believing that centralization is the path to corruption and intolerable concentration of power. Consider for example the state capitols of the US. Most often, the state capitol is not the largest city in the state. Compare that with other "federated" countries which have states/provinces. Meanwhile, at the national level, D.C. may be the political capitol, but it began as a tiny outpost, and remained that way until well into the 20th century. In most nations, the capitol city is the largest, wealthiest and most prestigious. Even in Germany, which is federated and has never been centralized except for one dark 12-year period in the 20th century, Berlin (the capitol) is emerging as the far-and-away major city. The point is that the US is "exceptional" in its dislike of selecting its political capitol as nexus of affluence, population and prestige. OK, maybe not completely exceptional... Canada is similar, in that Ottawa is much smaller than Toronto or Montreal.
In most nations that have had strong centralized governments and that didn't deliberately plan their capitals (Brazil, Australia, Canada, etc.). Is Berlin really far-and-away Germany's major city? It hasn't grown much over the last 20 years, and from what I read other German cities have better economies. Berlin has larger city limits, encompassing much of its metro, while other German city limits look much smaller. The largest urban area in Germany is the Rhine-Ruhr, but it's not a single city, just a number of cities very close together (closest American analog would be the Bay Area).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropo...n_Germany#List

Berlin is poorer than many of the others and similar in population to a number of others.

As for state capitals changing the "premier" city of the state, I don't think it has much of an effect. Albany is the capital of New York and it makes a bit more important than it would be for its size, but New York City has far, far more influence state-wide and elsewhere.

Last edited by nei; 03-11-2013 at 04:21 PM.. Reason: link, and correction
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Old 03-11-2013, 04:14 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
2) It is the capital city of the free world.
I don't think DC is a capital beyond American borders, I wouldn't want it to be.
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Old 03-11-2013, 04:32 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I don't think DC is a capital beyond American borders, I wouldn't want it to be.
Unofficially. Surely you have heard that the president of the US is the most powerful person in the world. He lives in DC.
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
It could happen..if a hydrogen bombs went off simultaneously in Boston NY, Chicago, SF, LA, DFW, Houston, Philadelphia, Miami, Atlanta...

Well that or a zombie attack.
You mean like this?


Bob Hope, Zombies and Democrats - YouTube
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Old 03-11-2013, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
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Whew, this got ugly fast, but I'll weigh in anyway.

1. The term "primate city" is Geography 101. The definition provided is only partially correct. While a primate city is 2x the size of the next largest city, the concept also includes the fact that not only is it the largest city in a country, but that there are no important (economically, socially, politically) intermediate-sized urban areas as well. The term was used to describe the urban hierarchy in places like the UK, France, and many other countries. The urban distribution in the US (and Germany for that matter) follows the rank-size rule of distribution. See a discussion of both concepts here.


2. When it comes to the hierarchy of cities, Washington, DC, is down the list on importance. According to the Global City theory, New York is the most important city in the world because of its extensive economic, political, and social importance. Economically, NYC is home to the largest concentration of major multinational corporations, the most important stock exchange, and is the economic engine for the largest economy in the world. Politically, NYC (the former capital city of the USA I might point out), is not as important nationally as DC, but as the headquarters of the United Nations, it serves a more international purpose. Socially, DC cannot compete. NYC is a major art, fashion, and cultural center for the world. Depending on who is doing the ranking, DC is ranked below Chicago, LA, and even San Francisco.
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Old 03-11-2013, 08:44 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Why do you think it got ugly? Calling congress primates was funny. Surely you know as well as I that people out west think DC rather irrelevant. Even the liberals think that. I've heard it time and again.
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Old 03-11-2013, 10:25 PM
 
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A blog discussing DC's rise in power and its new status as America's 2nd city
Hail Columbia! by Aaron M. Renn, City Journal Winter 2013
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Old 03-11-2013, 11:08 PM
 
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So I worked it out
If the DC and NYC metro areas continue to grow at their current rates (.63% and 2.18% respectively) it would take DC 124 years to become twice the size of of NYC. In 2133 the population of DC will be 82 million and the population of NYC will be 41 million.

But DC would still not be a primate city because the population of
DFW will be: 127 million
HOU will be: 108 million

So at current growth rates, DC will never become a primate city.
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Old 03-12-2013, 01:59 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Please discuss the topic, rather than other posters or whether you like the word choice of "primate city". If anyone's confused over the meaning of "primate city" ample links on its definition have been provided on the thread.
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:12 PM
 
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Quote:
anyone's confused over the meaning of "primate city" ample links on its definition have been provided on the thread.
Sorry dude, but why this dip (the orig guy in 1938, not the OP) chose to call something a 'primate city' is way more interesting and the answer using the definitions provided is an obvious and resounding "no".
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