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Old 03-14-2013, 01:07 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,901,256 times
Reputation: 4691

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
I don't see any neighborhoods in Philadelphia proper that have comparable values to the nice Main Line suburbs. Chestnut Hill and City Center West are well below Moorestown, Radnor, Lower Gwynedd, Bryn Mawr. You are also cherry picking--- the city as a whole is $106,000 vs. $190,000 for the Metro. Am I misinterpreting the definition of premium or does -$84,000 fall under some urban-post modern definition?
I'm taking about desirable areas. Someone looking out on the Main Line would also be checking out a place like Rittenhouse, not Nicetown, or even East Falls or Fox Chase. Square foot per square foot, Society Hill, Chestnut Hill, Fitler Square, etc. are right up there with the upper crust suburbs. The Zillow/Trulia-defined neighborhoods are overly large for the most part (people generally don't speak in terms of Center City "West" and "East;" and I don't know what you were looking at, but Chestnut Hill is, real estate wise, about on par with Merion of Wynnewood). And that's not taking into account the expensive cost of private school that is practically a necessity in those parts. That's the real killer for most upper middle class families. A family of four living off $90k would have trouble finding a sufficiently sized home in those neighborhoods in the first place.

 
Old 03-14-2013, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 408,429 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
That's sort of the point of this discussion. Sprawl, of course, is horrific - on that we can agree. What allows people year after year to continue existing in it is an interesting question. Does TV help to dull the pain as the OP posits?
Nope, actually not everyone can't agree on that....if you can believe that there are actually people who are happy with other lifestyles besides your own, which I doubt you're capable of.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
...granite countertops...
Oh, nobody in urban areas has granite counter tops? Proof?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Urbanism is healthy norm. Pathological is a good word to describe the diseased morbidity of sprawl.
I'd personally say that you come off acting pretty pathologically insane for insisting that your chosen lifestyle is some kind of "healthy norm", and acting as if anyone else who chooses to live somewhere else outside of your idea of urbanism is either unhappy or wrong for that decision.

Last edited by nei; 03-14-2013 at 01:44 PM.. Reason: personal attack
 
Old 03-14-2013, 01:35 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,722,246 times
Reputation: 2538
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
Nope, actually not everyone can't agree on that....if you can believe that there are actually people who are happy with other lifestyles besides your own, which I doubt you're capable of.



Oh, nobody in urban areas has granite counter tops? Proof?



I'd personally say that you come off acting pretty pathologically insane for insisting that your chosen lifestyle is some kind of "healthy norm", and acting as if anyone else who chooses to live somewhere else outside of your idea of urbanism is either unhappy or wrong for that decision.
Why you love American cities

"I love the giant freeways that go through cities, especially the huge stack interchanges in Texas.."

OK buddy If you say so.

Last edited by nei; 03-14-2013 at 01:44 PM..
 
Old 03-14-2013, 01:41 PM
 
2,926 posts, read 3,125,234 times
Reputation: 1498
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
I'm taking about desirable areas. Someone looking out on the Main Line would also be checking out a place like Rittenhouse, not Nicetown, or even East Falls or Fox Chase. Square foot per square foot, Society Hill, Chestnut Hill, Fitler Square, etc. are right up there with the upper crust suburbs. The Zillow/Trulia-defined neighborhoods are overly large for the most part (people generally don't speak in terms of Center City "West" and "East;" and I don't know what you were looking at, but Chestnut Hill is, real estate wise, about on par with Merion of Wynnewood). And that's not taking into account the expensive cost of private school that is practically a necessity in those parts. That's the real killer for most upper middle class families. A family of four living off $90k would have trouble finding a sufficiently sized home in those neighborhoods in the first place.
The Philly suburbs are more expensive than the city. You are cherry picking very narrow sub-neighborhoods and also comparing price per sq/foot which isn't the best metric since apts and townhouses are generally smaller in city limits.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 408,429 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Why you love American cities

"I love the giant freeways that go through cities, especially the huge stack interchanges in Texas.."

OK buddy If you say so.
Nice of you to post a clear example of why: I posted in a thread where the OP had asked "A thread about reasons that you love American cities from a Urban Planning point of view", to which I responded with my opinions about why I like what I do.

On the other hand, you come on here and pass judgement to others, with some kind of superiority complex that your desired lifestyle is the best, and that any other way is absolutely unsatisfying, unsettling and an unhappy place to everyone who lives there. What I post in my opinion is my opinion, I know not everyone will agree, especially on why they do or do not like the general layout of America's cities, however I don't throw around a bunch of incorrect opinionated nonsense and pass it on as some sort of fact or absolute, as if it's the only thing that everyone should just "get it" and do it "the right way", aka your opinion.

So yes, I most certainly do say so.

Last edited by nei; 03-14-2013 at 01:44 PM.. Reason: calling someone a troll is against the TOS
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