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Old 03-14-2013, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,363 posts, read 59,787,282 times
Reputation: 54006

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
People who live in sprawl may justify the misery by covering up the failings of suburbia to live up to the promise...some sit behind gated communities, modern fortresses designed to hide the real world just outside and mollify the lack of community with luxe cars and live the "lifestyle" - but deep down they hate it. I don't mean they hate their house..they love their house. Their houses are the last stand, the castle within the walled city to keep the horrors of sprawl at bay.


Give it up, dude. It's obvious your twisted fantasies are not based in reality.

[but thank you for the opportunity to use my favorite smiley]

Since you're so bent on painting all suburbs and suburban residents with the same brush, how about this:

People who live in overcrowded cities are neurotic, paranoid latte swillers wearing blinders who hide behind the anonymity of the masses, blame suburban residents for the crime in their neighborhoods, reject owning cars while bumming rides from their car-owning friends, take joy in hauling groceries 10 blocks and up five flights of stairs, and love their cramped 400 square foot apartment "lifestyle".

Hey, that was fun! I'm kinda feeling your attraction to all this fiction writing of yours ...

 
Old 03-14-2013, 08:05 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,713,037 times
Reputation: 2538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Healthy? You think it's healthy to live so far out of sync with nature that all your food has to be trucked in? I've heard "city" people, on this forum, say their kids have never seen a cow, don't know how to walk in grass, etc.
Appreciate the image of the gentleman suburban farmer though - that's quite hilarious.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 08:06 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post

Give it up, dude. It's obvious your twisted fantasies are not based in reality.

[but thank you for the opportunity to use my favorite smiley]

Since you're so bent on painting all suburbs and suburban residents with the same brush, how about this:

People who live in overcrowded cities are neurotic, paranoid latte swillers wearing blinders who hide behind the anonymity of the masses, blame suburban residents for the crime in their neighborhoods, reject owning cars while bumming rides from their car-owning friends, take joy in hauling groceries 10 blocks and up five flights of stairs, and love their cramped 400 square foot apartment "lifestyle".

Hey, that was fun! I'm kinda feeling your attraction to all this fiction writing of yours ...
Great post! I'll add:

City people desire to live near bars so they can get drunk every night, and day too. They say they spend their spare time at museums, the opera, theater, etc, but they really are just sleeping it off until they have to go back to work. Oh, and many are on welfare or other public assistance. (For the naive, I'll add the sarcasm smilie )
 
Old 03-14-2013, 08:42 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,095,690 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Great post! I'll add:

City people desire to live near bars so they can get drunk every night, and day too. They say they spend their spare time at museums, the opera, theater, etc, but they really are just sleeping it off until they have to go back to work. Oh, and many are on welfare or other public assistance. (For the naive, I'll add the sarcasm smilie )
I actually collect my welfare check at the art museum, but then I cash it at the bar next door.

Woohoo city life!
 
Old 03-14-2013, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,363 posts, read 59,787,282 times
Reputation: 54006
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
I actually collect my welfare check at the art museum, but then I cash it at the bar next door.

Woohoo city life!
Oooh, Baltimore sounds like a swingin' place.

But after all that drinking will there be any money leftover for you to attend the symphony, hit a trendy restaurant for dinner beforehand (all on foot, of course), and then stop at the coffee shop (locally owned, of course) for a latte? Oh, and don't forget on the way home to stop at the 24-hour market (locally owned, of course) for some fresh vegetables grown on the rooftop of the store.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 08:52 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,095,690 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Oooh, Baltimore sounds like a swingin' place.

But after all that drinking will there be any money leftover for you to attend the symphony, hit a trendy restaurant for dinner beforehand (all on foot, of course), and then stop at the coffee shop (locally owned, of course) for a latte? Oh, and don't forget on the way home to stop at the 24-hour market (locally owned, of course) for some fresh vegetables grown on the rooftop of the store.
It's all subsidized by suburbanites. Free money!
 
Old 03-14-2013, 10:18 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,713,037 times
Reputation: 2538
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
Agreed. And I will add that they (the "suburbanites") may not want to pay the cost premium that goes along with desirable inner city and charming inner ring suburban neighborhoods.

[choice - what a simple concept]
One other thing about your comment.

Urbanism is what happens naturally when people have choice. Sprawl is mandated.

Sprawl only occurs with massive legislative intervention. Everything in sprawl is not only allowed - it's mandated - from the width of the lanes, to the set backs to the slope of the curbs, to the swales and the berms, and the signage and the strict separation of uses, the number of parking spaces, the width of the stripes in the parking lot, even the height of the vegetation that's suppose to make us feel good about being is such awfulness - every last bit of it is precisely to code - sprawl is not choice - sprawl is mandated. And to top it all off, and none of it is remotely sustainable without incredible amounts of government subsidies.

When you say people choose sprawl - that's not entirely correct, in fact, in many parts of the country there is little to no alternative and what little there is - is priced exceedingly high because you can't build any more of it - by code.

The old urbanists would argue that in abscence of code you can get Paris. The new urbanists argue that if you replace bad codes with smart codes you can get Seaside.

You can neither get Paris nor can you get Seaside under the codes in place in most places - thought this is beginning to change and, for the first time in 50 years - actually do offer people meaningful choice.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 10:27 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
One other thing about your comment.

Urbanism is what happens naturally when people have choice. Sprawl is mandated.

Sprawl only occurs with massive legislative intervention. Everything in sprawl is not only allowed - it's mandated - from the width of the lanes, to the set backs to the slope of the curbs, to the swales and the berms, and the signage and the strict separation of uses, the number of parking spaces, the width of the stripes in the parking lot, even the height of the vegetation that's suppose to make us feel good about being is such awfulness - every last bit of it is precisely to code - sprawl is not choice - sprawl is mandated. And to top it all off, and none of it is remotely sustainable without incredible amounts of government subsidies.

When you say people choose sprawl - that's not entirely correct, in fact, in many parts of the country there is little to no alternative and what little there is - is priced exceedingly high because you can't build any more of it - by code.

The old urbanists would argue that in abscence of code you can get Paris. The new urbanists argue that if you replace bad codes with smart codes you can get Seaside.

You can neither get Paris nor can you get Seaside under the codes in place in most places - thought this is beginning to change and, for the first time in 50 years - actually do offer people meaningful choice.
I've heard that Houston has no zoning. Just sayin'. Is it a model of your idea of "urbanity"?
 
Old 03-14-2013, 10:30 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I've heard that Houston has no zoning. Just sayin'. Is it a model of your idea of "urbanity"?
Houston has minimum lot sizes and minimum parking requirements.

Houston proposes allowing higher-density housing outside Loop - Houston Chronicle

doesn't sound zoning-less.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 10:34 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Houston has minimum lot sizes and minimum parking requirements.

Houston proposes allowing higher-density housing outside Loop - Houston Chronicle

doesn't sound zoning-less.
How Houston gets along without zoning - BusinessWeek
**Houston is well known as the only major U.S. city with no formal zoning code. . . . The absence of a comprehensive land use code conjures up images of a disjointed landscape where oil derricks sit next to mansions and auto salvage yards abut churches. To some degree these anomalies exist, yet for the most part Houston is like any other large North American city.

What is unique about Houston is that the separation of land uses is impelled by economic forces rather than mandatory zoning.


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