U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-13-2013, 02:42 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Good point - probably should push anything non-NYC beyond the top 10.
DC and Boston would probably be up there too with Chicago, LA, SF, Philly.
I don't think DC would make the list.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-13-2013, 02:51 PM
 
1,303 posts, read 1,574,134 times
Reputation: 992
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
In Los Angeles it is probable the area bounded by Rampart and Hoover on the West, Pico on the South, 3rd on the North and the 110 Freeway on the East. This is the general area: Pico / Hoover to Pico / Hoover - Google Maps

Pretty tough to accurately estimate the density, but the tracts in this area range from 17.5k to 90k. Doing a simple average of the census tracts is 45k ppsm, and the median of those tracts is 44k ppsm - I'll assume those numbers are pretty close to actual density.

I would imagine the top 10 of these are mostly in NYC, maybe San Francisco, Chicago, LA or Philly could squeak in something around 6th - 10th place.
I would wager of the top 50 densest 1 square miles in the US, all 50 would be in NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2013, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Salinas, CA
15,051 posts, read 4,804,218 times
Reputation: 8093
Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
The densest square mile in Albuquerque is.........drumroll....... meh who cares, it hardly amounts to very much density.
I could say the same thing for Salinas. The highest density square mile for residential population is different than the highest density for businesses/restaurants. The former (residents) would be one of the east side lower/middle class neighborhoods and the latter (businesses) is probably a tie between downtown (often called Oldtown) and the Northridge Mall/Harden Ranch Center area.

In any event. as is the case for most cities, there is nothing of significant density here to compare with New York or San Francisco. Both of those cities have far more high rise developments and yards in residential areas are often non-existent or very small.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2013, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,118,020 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessgeek View Post
I could say the same thing for Salinas. The highest density square mile for residential population is different than the highest density for businesses/restaurants. The former (residents) would be one of the east side lower/middle class neighborhoods and the latter (businesses) is probably a tie between downtown (often called Oldtown) and the Northridge Mall/Harden Ranch Center area.

In any event. as is the case for most cities, there is nothing of significant density here to compare with New York or San Francisco. Both of those cities have far more high rise developments and yards in residential areas are often non-existent or very small.
Just to the south (and a very similar city to Salinas), my hometown of Santa Maria's densest square mile is bounded by Blosser on the West, Main St. on the North, Stowell on the South and Broadway on the East and it is about 14.5k ppsm. The square mile immediately to the north of it is about the same density, probably about 14k ppsm.

I just took a look at Salinas and it has census tracts of 14k, 17k, 24k, 26k, 26k and 34k ppsm on its East side. I think it easily puts some major US cities to shame with those numbers.

Of course both Santa Maria and Salinas are probably denser than they should be because of overcrowding (though the numbers I have are probably lower than reality due to both cities having a high number of illegal immigrants).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2013, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,763,654 times
Reputation: 1616
For Toronto, Parliament-Bloor-Bay-Dundas is 72.2k ppsm and slightly under 1 square mile and Parliament-Bloor-Bay-Queen is 64.2k ppsm and slightly over 1 square mile. Taking a 1.06 square mile area in North York Centre, I get 48.7k ppsm, although some of the city blocks are very irregularly shaped so the area is not square/rectangular. A large majority of that population lives within a block of Yonge from highway 401 to Drewry Avenue.

Last edited by memph; 03-13-2013 at 07:13 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,037,464 times
Reputation: 3599
The easy answer is Bagley which actually fits a nice little 1 square mile box. It's somewhere between 9-11K ppsm. A good number of the homes are two-family flats which makes the area more populated than it looks.

Bagley, Detroit, MI - Google Maps

The other possible more dense square mile is the northwest section of Southwest Detroit. Also mostly built with two-family flats but is much more of a working class neighborhood relative to the above one.

Google Maps

There's some other census tracts with higher densities, but they're no where near a full square mile.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 01:09 AM
 
940 posts, read 1,739,056 times
Reputation: 732
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I bet a square mile in Koreatown would get you something pretty close too, bounded by Hoover / Olympic / Western / 3rd. Probably about 40-45k ppsm in that area too.
The LA Times mapping project profile for Koreatown has the neighborhood as 2.70 sq miles with a population of roughly 120,000, for a density of around 42k/sq mi.

Koreatown Profile - Mapping L.A. - Los Angeles Times

Would have to imagine you can find a square mile in there that's almost 50 or above.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 06:53 AM
 
1,750 posts, read 2,895,113 times
Reputation: 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by FAReastcoast View Post
I would wager of the top 50 densest 1 square miles in the US, all 50 would be in NYC.
I would agree. The Upper East Side is ~210,000 people living in 1.75 sq miles for an overall density of ~120,000 ppsm; I am sure there is a square mile there in the 140,000 ppsm range.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 07:08 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810
But all top 50? I'm not sure if there are enough square miles in New York City to be denser than every place in the country. Hard to estimate, a good gauge would to find out the densest square mile outside of New York City to figure out how much density is required.

My guess is the densest square mile outside of New York City would be in San Francisco (Chinatown northward) but a number of cities will probably be close.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2013, 07:51 AM
 
1,750 posts, read 2,895,113 times
Reputation: 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
But all top 50? I'm not sure if there are enough square miles in New York City to be denser than every place in the country. Hard to estimate, a good gauge would to find out the densest square mile outside of New York City to figure out how much density is required.

My guess is the densest square mile outside of New York City would be in San Francisco (Chinatown northward) but a number of cities will probably be close.
Right, but cities like Chicago, LA, Philly all have their densest square mile in the low 50K's, Chinatown in SF is very dense, but the area is no where near 1 square mile; I would wager the densest square mile in SF is right around 55k ppsm. I would also guess that NYC has 50 1 sq mile areas >55k ppsm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top