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Old 03-14-2013, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
There's some other census tracts with higher densities, but they're no where near a full square mile.
Random thought: I think the densest square mile for the Detroit metro is in Ann Arbor. The second densest looks like it's in Hamtramck.
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Old 03-15-2013, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by checkmatechamp13 View Post
Random thought: I think the densest square mile for the Detroit metro is in Ann Arbor. The second densest looks like it's in Hamtramck.
Ann Arbor isn't really considered apart of the metro. It's only included in the CSA. But yea, the university dormitories up the density past 12K and obviously plenty of college students live near downtown.

Also I checked out Hamtramck's density and it's about the same as the densest parts of Detroit. Development-wise, Hamtramck isn't any different from the older areas of Detroit except for less vacancy.

Hamtramck, MI - Google Maps

Detroit, MI - Google Maps
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Canada
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The densest square mile in Vancouver is about 50-55k per square mile, centred on the West End.
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:20 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I just took a look at Salinas and it has census tracts of 14k, 17k, 24k, 26k, 26k and 34k ppsm on its East side. I think it easily puts some major US cities to shame with those numbers.
Some of it must be enormous overcrowding. Skimming streetview, most of the housing is detached housing on small lots. Much of it not even two stories. 15k/sq mile might be possible without overcrowding, but higher is unlikely. 30k/sq mile is the density of a New England neighborhood with lots of triple deckers.
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:31 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by checkmatechamp13 View Post
Random thought: I think the densest square mile for the Detroit metro is in Ann Arbor.
That seems common for college areas; the densest tract north of Westchester County is in Ithaca (doubt Ithaca could make the densest square mile, Albany and Buffalo should come out ahead). Likewise, Champaign has the densest tract in Illinois outside of Chicago and probably the densest square mile.

I wonder how accurate that is, perhaps dorm living students might be counted incorrectly. As for Ithaca, it looks the part in its densest tract — it has relatively recently built streetwall construction of 6+ stories. Hard to find photos posted one here but it doesn't show the whole street:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/22640592-post35.html

found an image:

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3605/3...d0dcc285_z.jpg
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Old 03-15-2013, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Around my university, the norm is basically around 300 sf of living space per student... that's in houses rented out to students. So you might have 5 students in a bungalow with 5 bedrooms, 1 kitchen, 1 living room and 1 bathroom. In apartment buildings, it can be even less (fewer stairs, utility rooms per student) and in university residences where students have cafeterias, bathrooms and lounges shared among much more students, it's probably less still. Compare that to 900 sf per person as the US average and 600 sf per person as the mean, and I could definitely see why student neighbourhoods are denser then they look.

I'm not sure how crowded that Salinas census tract would be, it still has a lot of 1-2 storey multi family buildings as well as quite a lot of what looks like accessory dwellings. It probably is crowded but maybe not extremely crowded.
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Old 03-16-2013, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Maryland outside DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That seems common for college areas; the densest tract north of Westchester County is in Ithaca (doubt Ithaca could make the densest square mile, Albany and Buffalo should come out ahead). Likewise, Champaign has the densest tract in Illinois outside of Chicago and probably the densest square mile.

I wonder how accurate that is, perhaps dorm living students might be counted incorrectly. As for Ithaca, it looks the part in its densest tract — it has relatively recently built streetwall construction of 6+ stories. Hard to find photos posted one here but it doesn't show the whole street:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/22640592-post35.html

found an image:

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3605/3...d0dcc285_z.jpg

The city of Ithaca is about 5,500 per square mile, but Collegetown (The neighborhood where I was born and raised) is about five times that. Here's another pic:


Ithaca 28 by exithacan, on Flickr

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Old 03-16-2013, 09:55 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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For Miami Beach, I imagine that it's the NW corner of South Beach.
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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1020.1 ppsm
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:25 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Hmm. I wonder what the densest square mile in Europe (maybe just western Europe)? The developed world (excluding Hong Kong)?
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