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Old 03-17-2013, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
Reputation: 661

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
people prefer driving around in their big cars and trucks all year round, with heavily tinted windows to make sure they don't get any sun on them. And they want to stay indoors in their suburban houses all day long......There's no walking or biking culture whatsoever...
I don't know how you could make such a broad, sweeping and absolute generalization..nor do I see how it's any issue whatsoever how people would like to travel or where they choose to spend their time. If you want a culture where more people spend time outside in public spaces, there are plenty of places where you can find that...I'd bet even in California. I'm also pretty sure I saw a TON of people walking and biking when I was in California, perhaps they were just phantom walkers and bikers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
there's no bikesharing in SF or LA. city officials love paying lip service but they have yet to implement anything. it takes them 10 to 20 years to install just a single block of bike lane on a street if you're lucky. they say there's no money for it and yet they will gladly spend 50 billion dollars on 40 miles of brand new interstate highways at the drop of a hat. when it comes to highways there's no red tape no waiting or nothing. thanks to pressure from the well-funded industry highway lobby they'll fast track that highway proposal quicker than you can say campaign contribution.
...or maybe the majority of people just like using their cars and prefer the expansion of the road network?
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,074,613 times
Reputation: 12636
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
there's no bikesharing in SF or LA. city officials love paying lip service but they have yet to implement anything. it takes them 10 to 20 years to install just a single block of bike lane on a street if you're lucky. they say there's no money for it and yet they will gladly spend 50 billion dollars on 40 miles of brand new interstate highways at the drop of a hat. when it comes to highways there's no red tape no waiting or nothing. thanks to pressure from the well-funded industry highway lobby they'll fast track that highway proposal quicker than you can say campaign contribution.
Who cares about bikesharing? That's like saying a place doesn't have any auto culture because it has no carsharing. Actually, it makes even less sense. A good bike will set you back a couple hundred bucks.

And if biking in LA is beach cruisers on Venice beach, then it's riding bicycles on a Coney Island in NYC. A larger considerably larger percentage of people get around LA by bike than do in NY.
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:01 AM
 
630 posts, read 840,686 times
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Highrises and relatively quietness of its downtowns compared to its world counterpart with the exceptions of NY, SF and Chi.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:12 AM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,265,560 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Who cares about bikesharing? That's like saying a place doesn't have any auto culture because it has no carsharing. Actually, it makes even less sense. A good bike will set you back a couple hundred bucks.
doesn't matter. bikesharing would be pointless anyway when you have zero biking infrastructure. no bike lanes, no bike paths. its like to trying to promote a car culture without building any roads first. putting the cart before the horse. attempting to ride a bicycle on LA streets? you're just going to end up as roadkill .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
A larger considerably larger percentage of people get around LA by bike than do in NY.

only in your imagination. where do you get such an absurd idea? this statement is laughable at best.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,408 posts, read 16,475,201 times
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I like that cities are less pollution. I remember coming home every day and having to wash the soot off of my face. Who knows what the stuff used to do to your lungs?

I like the green ideas, trees planted on the streets (actual birds singing over all the noise), green rooftops.

I like the decrease in noise levels, tickets given for beeping car horns unnecessarily.

Unlike some, I like street vendors.

I like green grocers and street markets.
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:15 PM
 
358 posts, read 359,810 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
Very nice neighborhood, very suburban. I prefer bigger homes and land, but I could definitely see myself living somewhere like that, sort of reminds me of my friend's neighborhood in Valley Stream, Long Island.
Uh oh.... You call it "very suburban", yet it's located in the city of St. Paul. There are some people on this message board that will have a problem with that!
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
Uh oh.... You call it "very suburban", yet it's located in the city of St. Paul. There are some people on this message board that will have a problem with that!
Haha, true! It's all good, it's hard to take that kind of ridiculousness seriously when I myself live in a single family home, mostly auto-oriented, quiet suburban style neighborhood within New York City..
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:41 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
Very nice neighborhood, very suburban. I prefer bigger homes and land, but I could definitely see myself living somewhere like that, sort of reminds me of my friend's neighborhood in Valley Stream, Long Island.
The idea of a city composed of lots neighborhoods that by appearance could pass for a typical neighborhood of Long Island confuses this former Long Island resident.
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The idea of a city composed of lots neighborhoods that by appearance could pass for a typical neighborhood of Long Island confuses this former Long Island resident.
Oh believe me, the idea of a city like Houston which has beautiful suburban neighborhoods such as this, only 15 minute drive (without traffic) to the city's core, and makes a "suburban" city neighborhood like mine feel downright Manhattan-like. From my standpoint, it's things like the link above which make me love American cities...the sprawl itself allows so many people to have relatively large properties and get around independently on huge freeway/arterial/sidestreet networks. I also like how employment is spread out much more, not just to big office parks but even little "downtown" clusters of office buildings, similar to D.C. (Silver Spring, Rockville, Wheaton, etc).
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,473 posts, read 2,368,936 times
Reputation: 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I don't know what it is about these sunny states. The weather is so sunny and mild in states like CA and FL yet people prefer driving around in their big cars and trucks all year round, with heavily tinted windows to make sure they don't get any sun on them. And they want to stay indoors in their suburban houses all day long. They're like vampires or something. There's no walking or biking culture whatsoever. If you ask a Californian about bikesharing they'll look at you like you're from outer space because it doesn't exist there. But in colder states like Colorado, Minnesota, Oregon, and the Northeast the pedestrian and cycling culture seem to be much more prominent and more mainstream. Go figure.
According to this site, 7 of the top 50 bicycling cities are in California (and 3 in FL). Not bad compared to most of the cold-weather states.

America
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