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Old 03-16-2013, 09:51 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A roommate share situation would be much easier to work out, which is what tends to appeal to the same demographic today as boarding houses did many decades ago. Still around.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/13/us...anted=all&_r=0

sounds like no transit, they all use cars.
Whoops. Hands already posted. And missed that there's transit.
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Old 03-17-2013, 03:42 AM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matzoman View Post
Kind of sad to no longer hear of those places. I think they are more rare now because of the lack of trust between people.
All the boardinghouses that used to be in this area were closed down 25 years ago, mostly because of the transients, ne'er-do-wells and drug traffick that they bring with them.
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Old 03-17-2013, 07:29 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The other downside of a boarding house is the old lady might disprove of the young person's habit. Not a roommate situation, but a live-in landlord, so some similarities:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/03/re...pagewanted=all
Yes, that could be a problem. I have read several novels set in DC during WW II, with young ladies living in boardinghouses. If these are realistic fiction, boardinghouses had rules, locked their doors at some hours, etc. Probably all different in different houses.

People value individual freedom these days. You see that in college housing, too. When my spouse went to grad school in 1970, he lived in a grad student dorm for a year. Now, such an option isn't even offered, AFAIK. Likewise, at the U of CO "married student housing", provided by the university, has been transformed into "family housing" and is mostly used by single moms. Back in the 80s, I worked with a nurse who lived in the married student apts with her husband.
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Old 03-17-2013, 10:29 AM
 
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We have several boarding houses here in OC. I think partly is because we have many old, giant houses with multiple rooms, some probably used to be summer rentals but now families want more amenities, so the owners started renting rooms year-round. I guess it depends on the town and the housing stock/types of homes in a particular town.
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Old 03-17-2013, 10:32 AM
 
Location: southern california
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Its coming. Just as soon as the law stops backing squatters who don't pay rent
Its open season on. Landlords
People move in with the hope of a law suit
Not the hope of a home
No intention of paying the rent
U think I make this stuff up dontcha
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Old 03-17-2013, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn,NY
10,614 posts, read 13,157,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
All the boardinghouses that used to be in this area were closed down 25 years ago, mostly because of the transients, ne'er-do-wells and drug traffick that they bring with them.
There used to be one in Brooklyn in my old neighborhood that stood for years but was shut down. "Welcome to hell" was spray-painted on it and the people who lived there trouble. Lots of fights and other undesirable activities went on around the area from that crowd. Awful.
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:02 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Ah why? If they are in an area with bad transit(exburbs often) then using them as boarding homes does not make much sense. The ones that can not provide a value will simply be torn down like any other housing. There will always be demand for big housing, a few large families or people looking for more room.

1. not all mcmansions are in distant suburbs - many are built in inner suburbs either as teardowns (replacing a small older house) or as infill on lots that got overlooked in previous waves of development - often these areas have at least some transit -
2. of course if you filled up a mcmansion at a low sq ft per person, that too would help support transit.
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Old 03-18-2013, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Also built before the term was about and in areas with some transit.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=sacra...30.57,,0,-0.48

There's pretty good transit (for Sacramento) there. But most people drive. Those houses are expensive. One of the owners of a firm I do work with lives in that neighborhood. Even when he's in the downtown Sacramento office, he drives. One of the big complaints in McMansion rooming houses seems to be the abundance of cars. We rent a not-quite McMansion (Just a more normal "executive" house in college). No one used the garage as you'd get stuck. So with five people living there and two semi-live in girl friends, we had a lot of cars parked on the street. Fortunately it wasn't fully built and there was a section of the street that didn't have room for houses (just a nature trail) where we could park to avoid pissing off the neighbors too much. Suburbanites have a sense of possession of the street in front of their house and get ornery when you park in what they perceive as their property.
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Old 03-19-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D. Scott View Post
There used to be one in Brooklyn in my old neighborhood that stood for years but was shut down. "Welcome to hell" was spray-painted on it and the people who lived there trouble. Lots of fights and other undesirable activities went on around the area from that crowd. Awful.
They definitely bring down the neighborhood and property values along with it.

We saw a beautiful Victorian home when we were looking to buy our house. Refinished strip hardwood floors, crown mouldings, French doors and a mechanic's garage with parking for six. It was listed well below the area's average and was listed for several months, but it wouldn't sell. The reason was the boardinghouse 3 doors down that just screamed "trouble" to anyone with eyes to see. Most people aren't interested in a neighbourhood where prostitution, drug trafficking and barricading your home with steel grates to prevent break-ins while at work are the norm.
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:42 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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I used to live in a boarding house.

Briefly, after college. This was in Lexington KY.

It was this old house, but I think it might have been built as a boarding house. It was run by these two old sisters, i think. LIke something out of a movie.

Most of the boarders were old guys. They had one other younger person, someone who was mainstreamed mentally ill...like one of the sisters said "he wasnt quite right in the head" but was on meds, and they sort of looked after him and ensured he took his pills (we were just a few blocks from the big state mental hospital, so i think this was a good placement for him).

In any case, we all shared a bathroom but I dont think the sisters cooked...so it wasnt room and board. My little room had a kitchenette built in, though.

So I figure the guys who lived there must of ate elsewhere.

But perhaps I was one of the last people to live in a rooming house. We have them here in Dayton, a few, "rooms for rent", but they are more like houses turned into SROs.

Heres a good book on SROs, rooming hotels, and rooming houses...which used to be a big part of inner-city living, before urban renewal....

Living Downtown
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