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Old 03-22-2013, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,091 posts, read 16,126,368 times
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Cliff note version: Shopping malls in declining areas are declining. Shopping malls in non-declining areas are not declining.

At least that seems to hold around here. The areas don't even have to be particularly vibrant. The two malls in my town, which has very high crime, very high unemployment, government just declared bankruptcy.... the malls are doing fine. The area isn't really in decline. It's always been economically depressed and the population is continually growing so it's not like the demand for retail shopping is doing anything but going up.
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Old 03-22-2013, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,514 posts, read 9,082,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Cliff note version: Shopping malls in declining areas are declining. Shopping malls in non-declining areas are not declining.

At least that seems to hold around here. The areas don't even have to be particularly vibrant. The two malls in my town, which has very high crime, very high unemployment, government just declared bankruptcy.... the malls are doing fine. The area isn't really in decline. It's always been economically depressed and the population is continually growing so it's not like the demand for retail shopping is doing anything but going up.
I agree with the first part, for the most part.

Circle Centre Mall is in the heart of downtown Indianapolis, and traditionally has done very well, but in the past several years Nordstrom's has left, leaving one large vacant anchor store, and several smaller stores are beginning to follow. Indianapolis itself is not on the decline, nor is Columbus, and their City Center Mall was demolished a few years ago.

Usually high crime, high unemployment, etc are enough to drive businesses out of town, or at least to another part of town. Are you actually referring to the malls within the city limits of Sacramento?

Sacramento looks so nice on "The Mentalist"!
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Old 03-22-2013, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,043 posts, read 102,757,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
For the imaginary, mystical and mythical people who still like to buy things in person.

On a more serious note, I do feel that brick-and-mortar retail will not so much decline, but adapt also. For all the old malls and big box stores that close, new places open up all the time. You have a much larger amount of people buying things online nowadays, but if taking a visit to any one of the 5 shopping malls in a 20 minute drive of my house shows me anything, if the crush of people at these malls during the holidays says anything...I don't see brick and mortar shopping disappearing any time soon. Restructuring, reorganizing, maybe even downsizing or creating new ways to enhance the shopping experience (like these fancy "lifestyle centers" aka pockets of Disney-fied "urbanism" with lots of parking, works for me if it gets people going and makes money) is what they'll do.
I agree, especially with the bold.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Cliff note version: Shopping malls in declining areas are declining. Shopping malls in non-declining areas are not declining.

At least that seems to hold around here. The areas don't even have to be particularly vibrant. The two malls in my town, which has very high crime, very high unemployment, government just declared bankruptcy.... the malls are doing fine. The area isn't really in decline. It's always been economically depressed and the population is continually growing so it's not like the demand for retail shopping is doing anything but going up.
Agreed. Cinderella City, pictured several posts above, is a good example of that.
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,532,420 times
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I certainly wouldn't predict the demise of the mall, but the rise of Internet retailing, with the advantages of greater varieties of product, privacy, 24-hour operation, and having someone else do the delivery is far to great an advantage to ignore, and it can only increase as an older generation loses some of its mobility and several demographic trends inveigh in favor of the "dispersal of the marketplace".

I have to admit to some prejudice here, as it was an Internet retailer who got me back into the mainstream of the workforce -- at the age of 62, no less.
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,362,860 times
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- The recession put a lot of stores out of business, and those that it didn't felt stress.
- Even before the recession, typically free-standing discount stores like Walmart, Target, etc. offered better prices than traditional mall anchors (JCPenny, Sears, Montgomery Wards, etc.)
- Online retail allows shoppers virtually infinite variety and lower prices than brick-and-mortar stores, as well as the chance to evade sales taxes.
- Some goods which once required physical pick-up (CDs, DVDs, even books) are now available online, either for purchase or pirated, driving record stores, movie shop / rental venues, and bookstores to obsolescence.
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Old 04-01-2013, 01:54 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,906,890 times
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I only get electronics online. Some people prefer trying on clothes in person and like getting it now. I also feel you don't get to see all the selection of clothes online. I think with retail in general that too much competition will hurt some older shopping centers.

We only have 2 malls here. One in my county which is an outlet mall and is doing great for the locals and tourists. There aren't any big box centers that are competing with the outlet mall either. We have a Wal-Mart and a Ross and a Payless shoes. With all the wealthy people here, most people still support the mall.

BTW, in my opinion the cities where malls are hurting generally have more lower-income demographics. Wealthy urban and suburban areas still have their malls doing quiet well. Clothes from a mall is more of a luxury now. Columbus, OHIO is no Irvine, CA or Santa Monica, CA.

My town which has the outlet mall happens the be a wealthy coastal town and that and tourism is probably why the mall is doing better than the mall in the mid-sized city 20 minutes away.
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Old 04-02-2013, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,159,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I only get electronics online. Some people prefer trying on clothes in person and like getting it now. I also feel you don't get to see all the selection of clothes online. I think with retail in general that too much competition will hurt some older shopping centers.

We only have 2 malls here. One in my county which is an outlet mall and is doing great for the locals and tourists. There aren't any big box centers that are competing with the outlet mall either. We have a Wal-Mart and a Ross and a Payless shoes. With all the wealthy people here, most people still support the mall.

BTW, in my opinion the cities where malls are hurting generally have more lower-income demographics. Wealthy urban and suburban areas still have their malls doing quiet well. Clothes from a mall is more of a luxury now. Columbus, OHIO is no Irvine, CA or Santa Monica, CA.

My town which has the outlet mall happens the be a wealthy coastal town and that and tourism is probably why the mall is doing better than the mall in the mid-sized city 20 minutes away.
Apparently you know nothing about columbus. Columbus has one of the healthiest economies in the midwest/northeast and is where designers (just recently michael khors, nordstrom etc) are setting up shops and boutiques (in the region). The days many designers/shops decide to open in Columbus over Cleveland. Check out the Easton Towne Center. Also Columbus is headquarters to a large fashion population and many chain retail brands like victoria's sectret, express, limited, abercrombie etc.

The cities downtown mall closed due to over retailing. The city boomed in the 90s and had too many malls built by developers. The city became over retailed and thus some had to close. But the ones closing weren't in a bad area. So the poster's theory above doesn't apply to a city like Columbus.
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Old 04-02-2013, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,514 posts, read 9,082,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
Apparently you know nothing about columbus. Columbus has one of the healthiest economies in the midwest/northeast and is where designers (just recently michael khors, nordstrom etc) are setting up shops and boutiques (in the region). The days many designers/shops decide to open in Columbus over Cleveland. Check out the Easton Towne Center. Also Columbus is headquarters to a large fashion population and many chain retail brands like victoria's sectret, express, limited, abercrombie etc.

The cities downtown mall closed due to over retailing. The city boomed in the 90s and had too many malls built by developers. The city became over retailed and thus some had to close. But the ones closing weren't in a bad area. So the poster's theory above doesn't apply to a city like Columbus.
Over retailing? I've never heard that one before. Seems strange though, a city like Columbus doing as well as it is, and with Ohio State University in such close proximity to the downtown area, why wasn't City Center Mall able to survive? It seemed like a decent mall. Albeit, no Circle Centre Mall!
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Old 04-02-2013, 05:30 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 84,056,192 times
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Not much profit to support the stores when it becomes a hangout palce for non-shopers in so many cases;which shoppers then avoid.
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Old 04-03-2013, 03:01 PM
 
1,211 posts, read 892,047 times
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I heard malls are popular during the winter in the suburbs when you have little kids. Our friends can't say the word "Mall" in front of their kids unless they are going to bring them there. Our kids have never been to a mall, however.
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