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Old 02-19-2015, 02:08 PM
 
410 posts, read 389,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I'm not a fan of the trashy red and yellow plastic interior decor. looks really cheap and ugly to me and the general ambiance is a step above that of a prison cafeteria. the only thing I like at McD's is the coffee but will have it to go because I can't stand the decor. I read that fast food places tend to purposely design their interiors to make people feel uncomfortable so they will not want to sit more than a few minutes at a time so they can cycle more through more customers. so that probably explains it.

McDonald's might serve as a de facto casual meeting place for many people the reason being because in the suburbs there's nowhere else for you to casually meet people (besides Starbucks). and it tends to attract a lot of trashy and thuggish types. do a search on 'McDonalds fight' on Youtube and you will see what I mean. there are literally thousands of McDonalds fighting videos posted on Youtube. and that's why I have my coffee to go lol. what is it about this place that seems to bring out the worst in people? is it the food? probably.

a few examples (warning: foul language)


Women attacks Mcdonalds cashier because her fries were cold! - YouTube


CRAZY McDONALDS FIGHT !!! - YouTube


MCDONALDS FIGHTS GONE WILD 2012 - EP 13 - TIX360.COM - YouTube
Do you believe those "McDonalds fights" only occur in the suburbs? The second video you posted was filmed at a McDonald's near AT&T park in downtown San Francisco. Here's another McDonalds attack that occurred in Greenwich Village NY:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-abstGkJ-E
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Old 02-19-2015, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,292,270 times
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I think some malls may have died due to changing demographics around them. It almost seems like malls in close proximity to lots of teenagers do the best? I have nothing against malls, but I don't have one very near our house. In the Denver metro area, I believe there are only 4 malls left: Cherry Creek, Park Meadows, Flatirons and Aurora Town Center. The Aurora one is sort of teetering on the edge of the cliff, but the others are very successful. I can think of 5 others that are no longer there, most, if not all, replaced with "lifestyle center" style shopping.
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Old 02-19-2015, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
7,542 posts, read 8,425,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LCSDays View Post
See DeadMalls.com

It is amazing and a sad commentary on our times.
Hardly sad at all, business succeed, and sometimes they fail.

The failure of a shopping mall can be due to the failure of its anchors, changing communities and changing tastes, competition from new malls or new ways of buying like online.
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Old 02-19-2015, 07:59 PM
 
40 posts, read 25,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
Hardly sad at all, business succeed, and sometimes they fail.

The failure of a shopping mall can be due to the failure of its anchors, changing communities and changing tastes, competition from new malls or new ways of buying like online.
Some of those malls are 40+ years old... which is past the expected lifetime of those commercial properties. Either the building deteriorates to the point that rentals fail to meet maintenance costs or the business fades off. To be sure, retail buildings in some small towns might be 120 years old and still be functional -- but that assumes a stable community. But Suburbia, where those malls are, is not so stable as it used to be. The post-WWII bungalows that attracted white middle-class veterans of WWII have often been demolished for apartments with not-so-prosperous folk who must watch their prices. They cannot go to the mall and pay high retail as white middle-class people could do in the 1960s and 1970s. They 'shop' stores with the word 'dollar' in their names. (So it is with inflation and the old five-and-dime).

With the demise of Montgomery-Ward, Mervyn's, and the numerous Federated and May entities, there just aren't as many possible anchors. A mall lessor is lucky to get a Target or Wal*Mart, let alone a Kohl's, Dillard's, or Macy where there used to be a Montgomery-Ward or Mervyn's. Sears and JC Penney are in financial straits. The traditional department store is dying in part because nobody looks at retail sales as anything more than a stopgap job.

Many of the stores had narrow customer bases. I recall seeing someone describe the defunct Chess King (a clothier dedicated to males between 15 and 25) as the sort of place that one didn't work in if you played chess... and that if you played chess you were not among its customers (the logo was the wrong chess piece, and as everyone knows, the King in chess is the least interesting piece (simply the target for attacks). Add to that -- Radio Shack is going under.
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Old 02-20-2015, 12:35 AM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,297,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I think some malls may have died due to changing demographics around them. It almost seems like malls in close proximity to lots of teenagers do the best? I have nothing against malls, but I don't have one very near our house. In the Denver metro area, I believe there are only 4 malls left: Cherry Creek, Park Meadows, Flatirons and Aurora Town Center. The Aurora one is sort of teetering on the edge of the cliff, but the others are very successful. I can think of 5 others that are no longer there, most, if not all, replaced with "lifestyle center" style shopping.
Will malls survive at all? Perhaps a few might survive in a given metropolitan area, depending on circumstances. Perhaps as a niche thing, being somewhat more upscale than a big box store.
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Old 02-20-2015, 09:34 AM
 
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I think that a bad economy is likely the single most important reason for decline. People are motivated to find cheaper places, such as dollar store type establishments. I've noticed that those are doing a brisk business in the Seattle area.
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Old 02-22-2015, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
I think that a bad economy is likely the single most important reason for decline. People are motivated to find cheaper places, such as dollar store type establishments. I've noticed that those are doing a brisk business in the Seattle area.
And the Bay Area, given a lot of the malls are now more faux downtowney lifestyle centers rather than enclosed malls. In Sacramento, it's more mixed. There's still Arden which is doing okay although a bit eclipsed by the suburban malls. Downtown Plaza they just tore down since they've found a new way of wasting taxpayer money on K Street. Sacramento is nothing if not predictable in that way. Florin Mall is now a WalMart. Basically, go where the middle-class does well and you'll find a mall. Sacramento drove most of the middle-class away and the malls followed them out to the suburbs.

No loss to me though. I never liked malls. If they get replaced by outdoor lifestyle centers I'll be the happier for it.
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Old 03-01-2015, 05:54 PM
 
40 posts, read 25,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
I think that a bad economy is likely the single most important reason for decline. People are motivated to find cheaper places, such as dollar store type establishments. I've noticed that those are doing a brisk business in the Seattle area.
"Bad economies" come and go. They weed out bad ideas in business, obsolete practices, poor operators in an industry, and excess capacity.

Shopping malls are expensive to build and operate, and they relied upon customers with above-average income that they could spend. Many were predicated upon the idea that the American economy would continue to create more prosperity for more people (an assumption false since the late 1970s) so that an increasing customer base of free-spending people would augment the prosperity of the malls built to meet what once seemed a certain growth of middle-high retailing. The malls would depend upon cheap labor to staff the stores.

Let's start with the labor force: for a few years, shopping mall stores would get plenty of intelligent people who had the 'wrong' college degree who would use their jobs as springboards to marginally-better work. But when the economy improved, that was over. Low wages attract the laziest, least-dedicated, and most transitory workers... and guess what sorts of people work there. People with no knowledge of the product, with little ability to explain why one wants the $75 blender instead of the one for $19.99 don't sell the higher-profit items.

Now for maintenance costs: the box store offers economies of scale with little unused space. Shopping malls have hallways that don't turn a profit -- but need frequent cleaning and are part of the tax roll.

When times get tough, marginal malls get hurt far more than do dollar stores even if the typical dollar-store customer gets hit harder than the average American in socio-economic status. People don't spend as freely and uncritically in hard times, and the mall gets hit. But maintenance costs and property taxes are as high to a mall owner in good times or bad.
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Old 03-04-2015, 09:41 AM
 
2,923 posts, read 3,119,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
Will malls survive at all? Perhaps a few might survive in a given metropolitan area, depending on circumstances. Perhaps as a niche thing, being somewhat more upscale than a big box store.
The death of all malls is greatly exaggerated. In 2012, shopping center sales totaled $2.4 trillion; an increase of 2.8% from the previous year and probably more surprising, 40% above the level in 2000. Enclosed shopping malls still comprise nearly a third of all retail sales in the country, while online remains in the single digits.

Clearly there are too many secondary and tertiary malls with failing anchors that may close or need to be reinvented ---- but in aggregate the enclosed mall isn't going anywhere.
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Old 03-04-2015, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
3,396 posts, read 6,184,097 times
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There's an interesting article here that describes the move towards "lifestyle centers" instead of malls. It places a lot of the blame for the decline of malls on the fact that people just got sick of them:

Quote:
But malls were eventually doomed by their own success: the formula became too easy to replicate, and the design became ubiquitous. With the same chain stores and cookie-cutter designs, malls came to symbolize both mind-numbing homogeneity and loss of community.

“Suddenly people realized this mall formula is everywhere and is getting boring,” says Beyard.
"Lifestyle centers" are supposed to be smaller and feel more integrated into a community, although that was the original idea behind malls as well.

Whatever the reasons, malls are certainly in decline across the country, although some will still hang on.
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