U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-19-2013, 05:41 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Yes but... All of the cities you mention WERE very industrial until recently. Their design reflects that.
For New York City:

Working-Class New York

An astounding half million manufacturing jobs were clustered in Manhattan south of Central Park. These constituted over half the manufacturing jobs in New York City and well over a quarter of those in the twenty-two-county metropolitan region. Manhattan had more manufacturing jobs than any other county in the country, with the exception of Cook County, which contains Chicago and its suburbs.

But historically, it's best described as a port city, which it still is, at least region-wide.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-19-2013, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,495,175 times
Reputation: 4893
Port activity can also be described as industrial, if not manufacturing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2013, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,118,020 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
But not to the same degree as Boston, NYC, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. Nowhere near.
Well, first off, one of those cities in your post is nowhere near the others.

Also, San Francisco, Central LA, central Seattle are all "near" the built-up nature of Boston, Baltimore and Philly's core.

Lastly, (and you didn't make this point), but Los Angeles is actually a major industrial city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2013, 09:38 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,158 posts, read 23,683,428 times
Reputation: 11626
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
But not to the same degree as Boston, NYC, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. Nowhere near.
NYC, I'll agree with, the rest of what you're saying is not true though. San Francisco is really urban and so is the core of Los Angeles and definitely on par with Boston and Philadelphia. Seattle and Portland less so, but they're smaller cities. NYC is about a bazillion leagues ahead of all of them. Then again, your post probably proves the point of the core of LA being underestimated (the part where you're not including SF as urban is pretty specific to you as I believe the vast majority of people would put SF in the same league as Boston and Philadelphia).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2013, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,118,020 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
NYC, I'll agree with, the rest of what you're saying is not true though. San Francisco is really urban and so is the core of Los Angeles and definitely on par with Boston and Philadelphia. Seattle and Portland less so, but they're smaller cities. NYC is about a bazillion leagues ahead of all of them. Then again, your post probably proves the point of the core of LA being underestimated (the part where you're not including SF as urban is pretty specific to you as I believe the vast majority of people would put SF in the same league as Boston and Philadelphia).
I agree, we could argue for days whether LA is more urban than Boston + Philly (it's literally been done!). But I think the fact that it can be argued for days shows that they are at least in the same league.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2013, 09:56 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I agree, we could argue for days whether LA is more urban than Boston + Philly (it's literally been done!). But I think the fact that it can be argued for days shows that they are at least in the same league.
Ok. Here's the difference:

In Boston I could walk for 4 miles and see a long stretch of vibrant, lively, pedestrian-full neighborhoods:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=P...w&mra=ltm&z=14

or go north toward Cambridge:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=P...4&via=1,2&z=14

I'll admit there's a large deadzone between the South End and South Boston, but either side is fine.

For Philadelphia, similar:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=C...p=1&sz=13&z=15

would a similar walk be the same in LA?

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=S...p=1&sz=14&z=15

The views I saw thorugh westlake do look very urban. It's definitely not Houston. Nice mural here:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=S...162.67,,0,0.56
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2013, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,118,020 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Ok. Here's the difference:

In Boston I could walk for 4 miles and see a long stretch of vibrant, lively, pedestrian-full neighborhoods:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=P...w&mra=ltm&z=14

or go north toward Cambridge:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=P...4&via=1,2&z=14

I'll admit there's a large deadzone between the South End and South Boston, but either side is fine.

For Philadelphia, similar:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=C...p=1&sz=13&z=15

would a similar walk be the same in LA?

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=S...p=1&sz=14&z=15

The views I saw thorugh westlake do look very urban. It's definitely not Houston. Nice mural here:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=S...162.67,,0,0.56
No it's not the same. And that is where LA loses points. Though I think it is in the same league and by 2030 that walk may be close to what you get in the East Coast cities, albeit wildly different in style. I will say a walk from Coolidge Corner to the North End sounds pretty daunting. For some reason I take way more super-long walks here in LA (5+ miles) than I ever did in Boston (though I worked on weekends there, could be an explanation).

Although I will say that walk in LA will take you through some of the most vibrant neighborhoods in the country, and will have a lot of pedestrians. I've never seen anything like 7th / Alvarado in Boston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2013, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,383 posts, read 6,014,040 times
Reputation: 3558
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Boston, New York City, and Philadelphia are not industrial cities. They're the major financial districts of the United States, office conglomerates, fortune 500 companies, retail headquarters, millions of square foot of general office space, but not industrial cities, just old cities.
Weren't these cities industrial at one time? If not back in the 30s, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2013, 08:50 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,825 posts, read 12,338,063 times
Reputation: 4779
The city of Baltimore itself is very dense but a lot of people live in the suburbs which spread very far out and a lot of people commute from long distances from places like Harford COunty and Carroll County. Most of the city is very ghetto with parts of town dominated by yuppies, mostly by the harbor. There are SOME spots in the city that have a small town vibe in a way like Hampden, especially the old native Hampden residents, not the hipsters who've moved in.

Also not many people take mass transit in Baltimore and most people in the area still drive. I see Baltimore as the entire region not just Baltimore City. There is way too crime for public transportation to be safe, and many of us prefer living in the suburbs.

Savannah, Georgia is not a very large city like Baltimore, but it is quite dense and has a lot of "hip" offerings for those of y'all who like that kind of thing. I also find New Orleans to be a very urban city in its central areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2013, 08:52 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,825 posts, read 12,338,063 times
Reputation: 4779
Yes that picture of Jackson, WY is BEAUTIFUL.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top