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Old 12-19-2013, 06:17 PM
 
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I measure this based on Density Levels in Some Neighborhoods, Architecture, and Pedestrian Friendliness/Walkability.

I include all of those cities from all over the world where urbanity is under-estimated and more urban than expected: Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Lille, Grenoble, most French cities/towns outside of Paris, Geneva, Zurich, Valencia, Taichung, Busan, Fukuoka, Nagoya, Baku, Belo Horizonte, Brisbane, San Diego, Baltimore, and Providence.

Why is this topic only about USA cities in the earlier posts? There is a whole world outside of USA.
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Old 12-20-2013, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orzo View Post
Overall, I agree Seattle and Portland don't quite hold up. But to your main point re: Seattle - I'd characterize the next set of neighborhoods as between 10K and 25K, but it really depends on how you define downtown. Just outside of the main part of the Downtown, there are Belltown and Pioneer Square, both of which are dense and urban. The next layer of neighborhoods are First Hill, Capitol Hill, and Lower Queen Anne/Uptown, which are some of the densest neighborhoods in the City. You've also got South Lake Union/Cascade and the International District lurking in there (and South Lake Union is densifying fast, with Amazon headquarters and tons of new development)

There are also some dense areas north of the ship canal, including U District, Ballard, Fremont, etc. The area directly South of Downtown is heavy industrial. This map shows it well (the two yellow areas in the central part are the financial district, where no one lives, and the Seattle Center, a park, arts, and event center).

It's also worth noting that Seattle is densifying fast, and is seeing an unprecedented boom in dense apartment buildings and condos throughout the City, but especially in the core and inner neighborhoods. It's adding more units to its core and inner neighborhoods than anywhere else in the country, I believe.
This.

Not trying showing bias to my new home city here. Seattle is truly becoming denser at unbelievable rates. Urban cores are spotted throughout the city and are growing taller by the day. Even the single family homes are packed in very tightly. 7-10 story apartment buildings with around 100-300 units are currently under construction on nearly every few blocks throughout the city. It's all very exciting. It is growing so fast that I wouldn't be surprised if it hit 700K within the next decade.

It's not SF or Boston dense, but it's far above Denver/Minne/Atlanta in terms of current and future density levels
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Old 12-21-2013, 12:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
This.

Not trying showing bias to my new home city here. Seattle is truly becoming denser at unbelievable rates. Urban cores are spotted throughout the city and are growing taller by the day. Even the single family homes are packed in very tightly. 7-10 story apartment buildings with around 100-300 units are currently under construction on nearly every few blocks throughout the city. It's all very exciting. It is growing so fast that I wouldn't be surprised if it hit 700K within the next decade.

It's not SF or Boston dense, but it's far above Denver/Minne/Atlanta in terms of current and future density levels
The city of Seattle’s level of urban density is appropriately rated, and not really underestimated, especially compared to international cities all over the world: Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Lille, Grenoble, most French cities/towns outside of Paris, Geneva, Zurich, Valencia, Taichung, Busan, Fukuoka, Nagoya, Baku, Belo Horizonte, Brisbane.

All of those amazing international cities all over the world are more urban than expected.
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Old 01-27-2014, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
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Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
LA, Minneapolis, Atlanta, Sacramento, KC, Columbus (OH), Richmond (VA), Omaha.
Richmond definitely does have decent urbanity, especially in the core neighborhoods. And LA looked pretty in most places when I visited as well as very dense. And a majority of our time in LA was spent on the Westside. We did saw Hollywood and West Hollywood (Or is WeHo considered part of the Westside?).
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Old 01-31-2014, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
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Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
Richmond definitely does have decent urbanity, especially in the core neighborhoods. And LA looked pretty in most places when I visited as well as very dense. And a majority of our time in LA was spent on the Westside. We did saw Hollywood and West Hollywood (Or is WeHo considered part of the Westside?).
Meant to say "looked pretty urban". Forgot to edit.
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Old 01-31-2014, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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I would say Portland, Oregon because Forest Park can mess with the numbers.
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Old 02-02-2014, 01:16 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
Richmond definitely does have decent urbanity, especially in the core neighborhoods. And LA looked pretty in most places when I visited as well as very dense. And a majority of our time in LA was spent on the Westside. We did saw Hollywood and West Hollywood (Or is WeHo considered part of the Westside?).
L.A. has some dense areas. A few I snapped.








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Old 02-03-2014, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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I think the core neighborhoods of Louisville are underrated after being there recently.
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