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Old 03-25-2013, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Salinas, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
LA, Minneapolis, Atlanta, Sacramento, KC, Columbus (OH), Richmond (VA), Omaha.
I had never seen Omaha on an urbanity list before. I think it helps to have Warren Buffett there and would bet he has financed some of the development there. I have heard some things about Columbus recently and Sacramento is better than it was...I know people that live nearby and visit on occasion. Having grown up near Minneapolis and visiting there in 2005, I definitely agree with you!
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Old 03-25-2013, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,115,862 times
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Omaha, Seattle, Sacramento, Kansas City, New Orleans (outside of the FQ, I knew that part was urban). San Diego is a good one too, seems to have experienced some of the 70s-90s densification that Los Angeles and the East Bay had.

I also under-estimated Dallas' but that really has more to do with what my expectations of Dallas were. Seems like there are a few corridors outside of downtown Dallas that are fairly urban.
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Old 03-25-2013, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
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I don't think anybody mentioned LA yet. It's stereotyped as being sprawly, but it's actually pretty dense and has pretty good transit. (By now, most people in the UP forum know this if they've been around long enough, but there's still plenty of people out there who don't think of LA as urban).
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Old 03-25-2013, 08:09 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,423,939 times
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LA by a landslide! Well, I'm sure there are others, but of the places I'm familiar with, LA seems to be the most misunderstood. The old "one big suburb," "no one takes public transportation," etc. myths. Funny thing is that when I was a regular on the LA forum that seemed to go both ways -- the people who like cities often discounted it (I admit, I did!) because they had all heard the stereotypes, and then there were all those people who wanted to move to LA because they thought they'd be living some paradise where they'd have a spacious single family home with a pool surrounded by greenery, then got there and found that unless they were wealthy the housing was smaller than most parts of the country, lots of LA is actually rather "concrete jungle," and most areas feel more gritty and dense than the suburban sprawled paradise that they envisioned.

There are a lot of other cities you just don't hear much about in urban discussions, but I don't know enough about most of them to really comment. Maybe the Texas cities. Houston had better public transportation than I had anticipated, as well as some nice older neighborhoods. And the Midwestern cities outside of Chicago don't tend to get a lot of attention. I haven't spent time in Milwaukee lately, for example, but my impression is that it has more going for it than I had realized. And Pittsburgh (yeah, I know, not Midwest) was much nicer an than I had anticipated. I covered a lot of ground just by foot, and we got around easily without a car.
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Old 03-25-2013, 10:48 PM
 
1,064 posts, read 1,572,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Omaha, Seattle, Sacramento, Kansas City, New Orleans (outside of the FQ, I knew that part was urban). San Diego is a good one too, seems to have experienced some of the 70s-90s densification that Los Angeles and the East Bay had.

I also under-estimated Dallas' but that really has more to do with what my expectations of Dallas were. Seems like there are a few corridors outside of downtown Dallas that are fairly urban.
Thank you!
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Old 03-26-2013, 03:04 AM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,036,454 times
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Just looking through google, I'm more surprised by Dallas' amount of vacant blocks. It almost looks a bit Rust Belt-y in some parts of the inner-city. Pretty odd since seemingly Dallas never had a population drop. Figured that scale of urban decay was limited to the Midwest.
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:38 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,987,606 times
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Los. Hands down.

I was pretty suprised how urban the place really was, after some visits. Quite a bit of the city is a lot like the NW Side of Chicago or the older suburbs like Cicero, Evanston, and Oak Park (adjusting for the weather, landscaping, and architecuture).

One of the areas I visited, Melrose/Fairfax or thereabouts, actually had a lot of streetlife, including newspaper stands on the sidewalk, just like Chicago used to have.
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:10 AM
 
7,598 posts, read 9,457,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
LA by a landslide! Well, I'm sure there are others, but of the places I'm familiar with, LA seems to be the most misunderstood. The old "one big suburb," "no one takes public transportation," etc. myths. Funny thing is that when I was a regular on the LA forum that seemed to go both ways -- the people who like cities often discounted it (I admit, I did!) because they had all heard the stereotypes, and then there were all those people who wanted to move to LA because they thought they'd be living some paradise where they'd have a spacious single family home with a pool surrounded by greenery, then got there and found that unless they were wealthy the housing was smaller than most parts of the country, lots of LA is actually rather "concrete jungle," and most areas feel more gritty and dense than the suburban sprawled paradise that they envisioned.

There are a lot of other cities you just don't hear much about in urban discussions, but I don't know enough about most of them to really comment. Maybe the Texas cities. Houston had better public transportation than I had anticipated, as well as some nice older neighborhoods. And the Midwestern cities outside of Chicago don't tend to get a lot of attention. I haven't spent time in Milwaukee lately, for example, but my impression is that it has more going for it than I had realized. And Pittsburgh (yeah, I know, not Midwest) was much nicer an than I had anticipated. I covered a lot of ground just by foot, and we got around easily without a car.
Milwaukee has some gorgeous housing overlooking Lake Michigan--probably the best view of a body of water I've seen in the US...
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Old 03-26-2013, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Dallas
2,092 posts, read 2,573,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Just looking through google, I'm more surprised by Dallas' amount of vacant blocks. It almost looks a bit Rust Belt-y in some parts of the inner-city. Pretty odd since seemingly Dallas never had a population drop. Figured that scale of urban decay was limited to the Midwest.
Google can't keep up with all the construction in Dallas's inner core. The lots are normally older apartment complexes that were torn down to make way for larger mid-rises or high-rises. There are probably a dozen multifamily units under construction right now and the smallest ones are normally 200 units, but most are 300+ units. Dallas's core is rapidly expanding and growing in numbers too.

Dallas Development map:
https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid...fa64c3b088f053

^^even this is missing things

Downtown is also making a comeback:
http://www.youplusdallas.com/stories...izing-the-city
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Old 03-26-2013, 02:10 PM
 
3,946 posts, read 4,044,691 times
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I'd say, as someone who lives there, that Dallas is less urban, and is really a giant suburb. After visiting truly dense cities, it just doesn't 'feel' the same. The freeways are so substantial and large that density has to be forced, it ain't gonna come naturally. Heck, I live in a far north suburb, and if I take a 2 hour lunch, I can eat near downtown, a solid 20+ mile drive.

Portland is another city that doesn't 'feel' particularly dense to me. Chicago and Baltimore on the other hand do. And so does a few Southern CA suburbs. I put them down as places that you wouldn't think of as dense but actually are. They have on average 2X the average population density of Dallas.
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