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Old 03-26-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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I haven't spent time in Milwaukee lately, for example, but my impression is that it has more going for it than I had realized.
Milwaukee is an undiscovered spot. Pretty neat town.
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Old 03-26-2013, 03:20 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessgeek View Post
I had never seen Omaha on an urbanity list before. I think it helps to have Warren Buffett there and would bet he has financed some of the development there. I have heard some things about Columbus recently and Sacramento is better than it was...I know people that live nearby and visit on occasion. Having grown up near Minneapolis and visiting there in 2005, I definitely agree with you!
The only thing I know of in Omaha financed by the Buffett family is the football stadium at Central High, where Susie Buffett was a student, also my DH. Still, Omaha has an "urban" core and downtown area.
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Old 03-27-2013, 03:06 AM
 
Location: OC/LA
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Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Milwaukee is an undiscovered spot. Pretty neat town.
Definitely. I've been here for 3 years after growing up in LA. While I will never get used to the climate, the actual city has a lot going on for it.
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Old 03-27-2013, 08:31 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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^
I was there for Germanfest, and to do some geneological research, and to check out a few of the gay bars.

I got to see a lot of the city as part of this (in fact I also used the bus a bit to get around) and really like the place. Doesnt have much of a skyline, but it makes up for it by neat neighborhoods. That stuff along the river makes me think "The Venice of the Rustbelt". And the people seem pretty friendly and outgoing, too.

The way the street grids work along the lake, and the lighter colored buildings and the somewhat rolling landscape give the northside areas (downtown north to Yankee Hill, towards Brady Street, etc) a vague 'San Francisco" feeling to the place....tho when I was in Milw I spent more time in that River West area (Bremen Street, Humboldt Blvd?) and in that old south side area with that latino neighborhood and gay bars.


Quote:
I have heard some things about Columbus recently and Sacramento is better than it was...
I used to live in downtown Sacramento, across the street from Capital Park, about a block or two from the Capitol. This was in the 1980s. At the time it seemed, well, southern somehow! More like the Southern cities I was familiar with...yet it also had the very un-southern latino/asian/hobo thing going on, plus the gay scene So a neat place to be. Very laid-back. Tree shaded streets, front porches and corner stores and taverns, Magnolias, camelias, iced tea and mild night breezes. Swimming in the river.

This was the so-called "Old City", plus the pre WWII neighborhoods like McKinley Park, The Forties, and perhaps also Land Park/Curis Park.

After going back and checking some pop numbers the place was indeed like some of those smaller southern cities like Lexington or Macon, or like Canton or Springfield here in Ohio. But this old core area is wrapped in mile after mile of suburbia. Which makes th0se surviving old parts much more special, thus desirable to live in.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
I'd say, as someone who lives there, that Dallas is less urban, and is really a giant suburb. After visiting truly dense cities, it just doesn't 'feel' the same. The freeways are so substantial and large that density has to be forced, it ain't gonna come naturally. Heck, I live in a far north suburb, and if I take a 2 hour lunch, I can eat near downtown, a solid 20+ mile drive.

Portland is another city that doesn't 'feel' particularly dense to me. Chicago and Baltimore on the other hand do. And so does a few Southern CA suburbs. I put them down as places that you wouldn't think of as dense but actually are. They have on average 2X the average population density of Dallas.
Portland actually has some pretty dense areas in the SW and NW quaddrants -certainly much denser and more urban feeling than most Sunbelt cities.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:27 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by orzo View Post
Portland actually has some pretty dense areas in the SW and NW quaddrants -certainly much denser and more urban feeling than most Sunbelt cities.
It really isn't any denser than Sunbelt cities. It's a bit more cohesive, with the dense neighborhoods all right near downtown and built in a more pedestrian friendly way.
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Old 03-27-2013, 11:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
It really isn't any denser than Sunbelt cities. It's a bit more cohesive, with the dense neighborhoods all right near downtown and built in a more pedestrian friendly way.
Yea I was not impressed by Portland at all, its a neat looking little city, but waaay too small for my liking.
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Old 03-27-2013, 11:30 PM
 
642 posts, read 961,295 times
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I've found that a lot of old, small towns seem to be more 'urban' in form than many larger, newer cities and towns:

Jackson, WY



Aztec, NM



Durango, CO



Moab, UT

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Old 03-28-2013, 05:20 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,102,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
I've found that a lot of old, small towns seem to be more 'urban' in form than many larger, newer cities and towns:

Jackson, WY



Aztec, NM



Durango, CO



Moab, UT
Durango. Love that town! Decently walkable and bikeable in its core. And great snowboarding at Purgatory
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Old 03-28-2013, 10:32 AM
 
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Great shots, especially of Jackson, WY...
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