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Old 03-31-2013, 04:33 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,122,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm not sure which point you're questioning.
Sorry for the vagueness.

That goods need to be trucked in. Goods must always be transported to market. Goods must be transported to cities and suburbs as well.
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Old 03-31-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Sorry for the vagueness.

That goods need to be trucked in. Goods must always be transported to market. Goods must be transported to cities and suburbs as well.
OK, well, I've been in these mountain towns, and they don't get stuff trucked in every day like in larger, less isolated places. They'll get a delivery say, once or twice a week.
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Old 03-31-2013, 04:41 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
OK, well, I've been in these mountain towns, and they don't get stuff trucked in every day like in larger, less isolated places. They'll get a delivery say, once or twice a week.
Speaking only for myself, frequency of deliveries is not really a part of my definition of urbanity. I wouldn't be looking for all of the goods found in metro areas in a small mountain town.

Walkability, and not needing a car for every errand, is the biggest measure on this board, I think.

Some of the western ski towns are way better than their eastern counterparts in this respect. I like Georgetown CO a lot.
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Old 03-31-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Speaking only for myself, frequency of deliveries is not really a part of my definition of urbanity. I wouldn't be looking for all of the goods found in metro areas in a small mountain town.

Walkability, and not needing a car for every errand, is the biggest measure on this board, I think.

Some of the western ski towns are way better than their eastern counterparts in this respect. I like Georgetown CO a lot.
If you saw the produce available in some of those towns you might feel differently. I've been to Creede in the summer, and they only got delivery one or two times a week, so they said, and the pickings were pretty slim in between. These places are isolated.

Georgetown isn't that far from Denver, and it's not really a ski town.
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Old 03-31-2013, 04:51 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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So which town were you referring to? Durango? That's not an inconsequential place either.
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Old 03-31-2013, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Durango is pretty isolated, though it's bigger than many places in mountain Colorado at ~16,000 people. I don't even know where Aztec, NM is. Moab is also fairly isolated, although close to I-70. But everything would have to be brought in from either Denver or, more likely SLC. Jackson is isolated as well.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orzo View Post
But the NW and SW quadrants are downtown and the adjacent denser neighborhoods. These areas combined are far denser, more cohesive and walkable, and more urban-feeling than Sunbelt cities.

You've got a large chunk of area that looks like this:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=bars&...313.45,,0,4.75

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=bars&...12,291,,0,1.55

No sunbelt city, even the huge ones like Houston or Dallas, have anything close to that level or size of consistently walkable, urban-feeling swaths (I'm talking about NW and SW combined, which flow into each other seamlessly)

Woah! Bike lanes, decent transit, and a very pedestrian friendly environment That seems like an a place I should visit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Los Angeles and Hampton Roads. Northern Virginia, as people outside of the tri-state region aren't familiar with it. Northern Virginia, or NoVa, though technically a suburb of DC, is quite urban and is actually built taller than DC due to height restrictions.

LA also has the density of some areas in the Northeast part of the country, without the tall buildings, as it is becoming more of a Mid-rise city in places, High-rise in some other neighborhoods, like Hollywood, and Downtown. Atlanta is also known as a suburban place, though it is developing in neighborhoods outside of the downtown periphery like LA.
Eh, I wouldn't say Hampton Roads. The only part that feels urban is downtown Norfolk. The rest of the area is pretty much suburbs and strip malls. The same can be applied to Northern Virginia as well. The area outside of DC like in Arlington and Alexandria are very dense, walkable, and urban. Once you get past that zone, it turns into suburbs very quickly. The same can be said for Maryland around the District outside of Bethesda and Silver Springs.

If I had to choose any place in Va that is very urban and underestimated, it would have to be Richmond. Charlottesville gets an honorable mention. It's more like the small towns pictured earlier though.
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Old 04-01-2013, 03:03 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Baltimore is considered urban it just has other drawbacks.

San Diego probably used to be more urban than it was. Aside from Gaslamp I found it's downtown pretty quiet and not all that urban feeling or vibrant.
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Old 04-01-2013, 05:11 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Baltimore is considered urban it just has other drawbacks.

.
Many of which are portrayed inaccurately. There's a lot going for it, too.
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Old 04-01-2013, 06:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Many of which are portrayed inaccurately. There's a lot going for it, too.
"o-m-g isn't it like the wire though!?"
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