U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-25-2013, 12:45 AM
 
1,108 posts, read 1,897,255 times
Reputation: 650

Advertisements

What cities have you found are typically under-estimated in terms of urbanity? Places that people here on city data and generally tend to not give enough credit to, in terms of how urban they are.

I've got two to start:

San Diego - Now, I'm not saying San Diego is really urban, but I feel people often view it as similar to Phoenix or other super-sprawly sunbelt cities, and I think it is substantially more urban that that. Downtown, Little Italy, Hillcrest, North Park, South Park are all pretty urban and make up a large chunk of the city. Even the beach communities like Pacific Beach of Ocean Beach have walkable, urban cores. There are a lot more street-facing, pedestrian friendly retail and commercial districts than you'd expect. Don't get me wrong, it's in many ways a sprawled-out city, but it has more urban areas and urban elements that people usually give it credit for.

Baltimore - everyone knows Baltimore is urban (to be clear, "urban" in the city-data sense), but I still think it's under-estimated. It is an incredibly urban city with massive rowhouse neighborhoods and a lot of in tact dense infrastructure. Sure, there are issues with rampant poverty, disinvested neighborhoods, and sections that are unsafe or not vibrant, but overall I'd argue Baltimore is one of the most urban cities in the country, easily. It is very walkable and has a ton of great urban amenities.

Last edited by orzo; 03-25-2013 at 01:01 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-25-2013, 12:54 AM
 
1,064 posts, read 1,571,998 times
Reputation: 307
Dallas is a city that is under-estimated when it comes to urbanity which is crazy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2013, 12:57 AM
 
1,108 posts, read 1,897,255 times
Reputation: 650
Quote:
Originally Posted by dee936 View Post
Dallas is a city that is under-estimated when it comes to urbanity which is crazy.
Can you explain how so?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2013, 01:28 AM
 
1,064 posts, read 1,571,998 times
Reputation: 307
My thoughts on Dallas being urban is when you get to downtown Dallas east and west of downtown is really build up and urban from manufacturing corperation's,to condos,apartments,townhomes and a lot of jammed up homes everywhere.Dallas also have suburbs that have of 125,000 people to over half a million people.Dallas downtown heading north on US 75 north is jammed up with major corperation's that have set shop up in North Dallas.Dallas can't be compared to cities that have a simple loop around them like Atlanta or Houston having two because when people visited those cities they can get a glimpse in one day as far as the urbanity of those cities even driving the major corridor of inner part of those cities.DFW is a different ballgame because city extend so far north,east and west until people get mislead by some of the poor pockets of density that the city have like Plano or Irving which are two strongly dense areas.Atlanta may have buck head and downtown but my experience in Atlanta and Houston you have to make it almost to downtown to see anything that is consider somewhat urban but in Dallas you can drive from Mckinney to Downtown Dallas and see so much urbanity
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2013, 03:36 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,742 posts, read 6,141,582 times
Reputation: 3590
I agree with Baltimore being one of the most urban in the country. I would rank Baltimore's structural density at #5. After NYC, Boston, SF, Philly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2013, 11:59 AM
 
675 posts, read 1,001,427 times
Reputation: 651
Quote:
Originally Posted by dee936 View Post
My thoughts on Dallas being urban is when you get to downtown Dallas east and west of downtown is really build up and urban from manufacturing corperation's,to condos,apartments,townhomes and a lot of jammed up homes everywhere.Dallas also have suburbs that have of 125,000 people to over half a million people.Dallas downtown heading north on US 75 north is jammed up with major corperation's that have set shop up in North Dallas.Dallas can't be compared to cities that have a simple loop around them like Atlanta or Houston having two because when people visited those cities they can get a glimpse in one day as far as the urbanity of those cities even driving the major corridor of inner part of those cities.DFW is a different ballgame because city extend so far north,east and west until people get mislead by some of the poor pockets of density that the city have like Plano or Irving which are two strongly dense areas.Atlanta may have buck head and downtown but my experience in Atlanta and Houston you have to make it almost to downtown to see anything that is consider somewhat urban but in Dallas you can drive from Mckinney to Downtown Dallas and see so much urbanity
Are you serious? How can you say that you have to get near Downtown Houston before you see anything urban. McKinney is no more urban than these places well away from Downtown Houston. And I might Add Sugar Land, Energy corridor are non-stop continuous Urban development stretching a at least a good 20 miles away from downtown Houston.

Have you been to the Woodlands?


Sugar Land


Energy Corridor near Katy,
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2013, 12:08 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,157,756 times
Reputation: 7738
^^ The Woodlands feels like a suburban edge city at best. mostly sorounded by very suburban planned communities. While Hosuton definetely has a large swath of development I am not sure I would consider the Woodlands, Katy (not sure I really have any personla feel for Sugar land) etc urban in this sense. Some areas in the loop are getting there and it continues to get better in this regard but the Woodlands is more like the burbs of NOVA than a city in the urban sense

Mid rise office clusters does not make a place urban IMHO, that is not to say living in a place like the Woodlands does not afford a desireable lifestyle than many people desire, just would not really call it urban in this sense
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2013, 01:14 PM
 
675 posts, read 1,001,427 times
Reputation: 651
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
^^ The Woodlands feels like a suburban edge city at best. mostly sorounded by very suburban planned communities. While Hosuton definetely has a large swath of development I am not sure I would consider the Woodlands, Katy (not sure I really have any personla feel for Sugar land) etc urban in this sense. Some areas in the loop are getting there and it continues to get better in this regard but the Woodlands is more like the burbs of NOVA than a city in the urban sense

Mid rise office clusters does not make a place urban IMHO, that is not to say living in a place like the Woodlands does not afford a desireable lifestyle than many people desire, just would not really call it urban in this sense
I'm responding to the prior poster who claimed Dallas is urban from downtown to McKinney... McKinney is no more urban that the places I mentioned in Houston so the claim is off.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2013, 01:19 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,157,756 times
Reputation: 7738
Quote:
Originally Posted by HouTXmetro View Post
I'm responding to the prior poster who claimed Dallas is urban from downtown to McKinney... McKinney is no more urban that the places I mentioned in Houston so the claim is off.

Would mostly agree then. Houston and DFW are getting more urban though. To me there area where they are not as much as other places of the same size are in a compressed urban form with continuity. But even that is changes. They are both mostly newer in their development and have developed more spread out so will take time but they are changing (by the year really)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2013, 03:16 PM
 
2,199 posts, read 2,319,826 times
Reputation: 1941
LA, Minneapolis, Atlanta, Sacramento, KC, Columbus (OH), Richmond (VA), Omaha.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top