U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-27-2013, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,272,260 times
Reputation: 741

Advertisements

I am all for every city being built up. The more NYC the better.
Honestly I thing most anti Urbanization people don't understand the city or know of it's positives.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-30-2013, 09:29 PM
 
4 posts, read 3,719 times
Reputation: 10
Yes I think being built up is not smart here. I think sustainable suburban developments are better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2013, 08:39 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,095,690 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by coastluvr View Post
Yes I think being built up is not smart here. I think sustainable suburban developments are better.
What's an example of sustainable suburban development?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2013, 09:22 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,713,037 times
Reputation: 2538
After a few stories, height isn't my great concern. I'm not for or against sky scrapers. What matters to me is how the buildings relate to and react with the street. I'd rather see a 8 story mid rise with zero setbacks that puts shops and restaurants on the street level next to generous sidewalks than a monolithic fifty story tower that presents itself as a fortress on the street level. Skyscrapers can be done well and have wonderful ground floors that invite a public in to explore. Or they can be featureless imposing stuctures that repel city life.

a minimum level of density is required to create a great sense of street life - Paris does it with mostly 8 story buildings. After that, sky scrapers are ornamentation to me...nice but not necessary to be a great city.

Last edited by Komeht; 03-31-2013 at 10:19 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2013, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,272,260 times
Reputation: 741
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
After a few stories, height isn't my great concern. I'm not for or against sky scrapers. What matters to me is how the buildings relate to and react with the street. I'd rather see a 8 story mid rise with zero setbacks that puts shops and restaurants on the street level next to generous sidewalks than a monolithic fifty story tower that presents itself as a fortress on the street level. Skyscrapers can be done well and have wonderful ground floors that invite a public in to explore. Or they can be featureless imposing stuctures that repel city life.
This

says it all
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2013, 04:38 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,873,926 times
Reputation: 4687
Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
I am all for every city being built up. The more NYC the better.
Honestly I thing most anti Urbanization people don't understand the city or know of it's positives.
Sorry, I'm not interested in living somewhere with a 70,000/square mile population density. Plenty of people would think my neighborhood is far too packed and congested for their liking. The 30,000-some in Center City Philadelphia is enough for me, and I'm not anti-urbanization by any stretch of the word. It's a simple matter of personal taste.

I'm all for building up urban cores to an appropriate point, but there are plenty of charming, sustainable, non-auto-centric outer-lying city/inner suburban areas that do just fine in the 2,500-5,000 density range.

Even lower-density, auto-centric portions of such areas, where charming custom construction is the rule and not the exception, has a worthy place.

This seemingly rural snapshot is just a couple miles from this cute village center.

People have the right to make certain choices in life, and with increased public transportation (among other important things) via smarter present retrofitting/future planning, we can make many of those choices a sustainable possibility.

Last edited by ElijahAstin; 03-31-2013 at 04:49 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2013, 08:05 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,406,006 times
Reputation: 6702
Nope. Bring it on! I can't live in Manhattan right now, so it would be nice to have some more truly urban options in my current city. That said, clearly high-density is not right for every neighborhood. But so often the "I don't want my city to become New York" concerns are so overblown. A handful of new apartment buildings does not Manhattan make.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2013, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,181,299 times
Reputation: 6239
It is unlikely any other US city will ever resemble New York. The density there is outrageous for American standards. I do want my city to become more dense and urban, but in the right places. Areas around current transit nodes and close to the job centers are prime candidates for mass urbanity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2013, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Kerkrade, Limburg, Netherlands
262 posts, read 463,383 times
Reputation: 167
It's too broad to choose whether I can agree or not here. It all depends on how it will be done.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2013, 01:46 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,885,958 times
Reputation: 1290
Height tends to block out ocean views. I tend to see dense downtowns, and really compact housing in coastal California. My small suburban coastal town has a mall, suburban houses, hotels, a large church, two markets, restaurants, and some 3 story buildings and even less four story buildings in the downtown.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top