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Old 03-26-2013, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,662,662 times
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I read a couple posts the other day that were saying how they didn't want their city to be built up like NY (density wise) because they felt it wasn't a good thing? Do you feel this way? If so, why?
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,895 posts, read 4,566,727 times
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Indianapolis a good example of this.
You have a small walkable urban core then you have the houses/sprawl etc to live in.
I prefer that over a NY style density anyday cause lets be honest you cant walk to everywhere in manhattan yet most of Downtown Indianapolis you can walk to all the amendities after taking your car and parking. Or even live downtown if you want for a lower price than NYC.
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Old 03-27-2013, 05:36 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,095,690 times
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There are many illogical people who think any increase in density is going to turn their burg into Manhattan.
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Old 03-27-2013, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
There are many illogical people who think any increase in density is going to turn their burg into Manhattan.
I don't think opposing density necessarily makes you illogical. There are some places where increased density doesn't yield the things often associated with density. Increasing density from 2,000 ppsm to 6,000 ppsm, for example, is not really going to get most places any closer to higher transit ridership, pedestrian activity, etc. In some cases, increased density just causes more vehicle traffic, which is a valid reason not to be crazy about it, imo. There's also the fact that adding more people to a neighborhood inevitably increases the overall number of *******s that inhabit it, which is also a valid reason not to be crazy about density, imo. And if your community was rather small(ish), tranquil and tight-knit, then I could see how someone wouldn't be pro-density.
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Old 03-27-2013, 09:54 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,095,690 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't think opposing density necessarily makes you illogical. There are some places where increased density doesn't yield the things often associated with density. Increasing density from 2,000 ppsm to 6,000 ppsm, for example, is not really going to get most places any closer to higher transit ridership, pedestrian activity, etc. In some cases, increased density just causes more vehicle traffic, which is a valid reason not to be crazy about it, imo. There's also the fact that adding more people to a neighborhood inevitably increases the overall number of *******s that inhabit it, which is also a valid reason not to be crazy about density, imo. And if your community was rather small(ish), tranquil and tight-knit, then I could see how someone wouldn't be pro-density.
You bet. My point was that the claims of "manhattanization" are almost universally exaggerated.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,101,497 times
Reputation: 3979
To a certain extent, no I have no problem with my neighborhood / city being built up. Los Angeles often gets the claims of "Manhattanization" as it has steadily become more and more dense - which is laughable.

Makes you wonder if those people have ever actually been to Manhattan.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
7,556 posts, read 11,889,080 times
Reputation: 4516
Quote:
Originally Posted by Broadrippleguy View Post
Indianapolis a good example of this.
You have a small walkable urban core then you have the houses/sprawl etc to live in.
I prefer that over a NY style density anyday cause lets be honest you cant walk to everywhere in manhattan yet most of Downtown Indianapolis you can walk to all the amendities after taking your car and parking. Or even live downtown if you want for a lower price than NYC.
I would love that scenario for our town.
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Old 03-27-2013, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,745,723 times
Reputation: 8803
I would love for my inner city to be built up. Density brings in money and business, transit, and amenities. That parts that don't need it are the suburban areas that will do nothing but clog up the 6 lane roadways.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:19 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
12,566 posts, read 15,036,884 times
Reputation: 12118
I dislike it, too much congestion and tension, which results when personal space is taken away (more density).
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Old 03-27-2013, 03:17 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,003,488 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccm123 View Post
I dislike it, too much congestion and tension, which results when personal space is taken away (more density).
In the south Bay, most of the congestion and resultant tension comes from lack of medium-high density and centrality rather than because of high density, as people have to drive farther to get to places. Higher density tends to mean shorter trips and thus less of a cumulative effect on congestion.

If anything, I'm against local governments de facto deciding built form, low-, medium- or high-density, via strict zoning. I'd prefer developers make that decision, as they need to build what customers want (and are able to buy) in any given area in order to turn out a profit.
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