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Old 03-30-2013, 08:45 AM
 
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It will be expensive and take generations, but the following is a pretty decent roadmap:

1. Infill infill infill: the core cities must be revitalized. This is a painstaking and slow process frought with financial risk, regulatory constraints and political land minds. NIMBYism is ever present and developers who engage in this have to have deep pockets, incredibly patient financiers and and a stomache for years and years of fights. Need to wholesale revamp city landuse codes which have developed into a kafkaesque nightmare over the years and replace most use zoning with form-based codes. Have the fight once, and then let the city evolve naturally.

2. Transit. And by transit I mean high capacity transit. And by high capacity transit I mean fixed rail. And by fixed rail I mean light rail. You will never get a high ridership in most American cities on bus. Never. Touted BRT systems are just as, if not more expensive than light rail and do not have same attraction. Cheap BRT is glorified bus that doesnt offer any real benefits. Light rail pays dividends over time. It spurs incredible development along the transit corridors and stops you never ever ever get with buses. It's expensive up front and cheap on the back end. And single lines don't work...for light rail to flourish it has to be a network taking people where they want to go.

3. Brownfield redevelopment of former industrial sites into dense urban nodes like Stapleton and Mueller.

4. Suburban retrofits. Tear down the dying malls - look at those acres usually well placed on major access points into incredible opportunities for redevelopment into town centers. Stich the grid back together. Engage in Road diets and zone the transit corridors VMU to create vibrant mixed use streets people actually want to be on.

5. Smart greenfield development. Even in the most optimistic scenario above at least 50% of all new development will be greenfield (today a major success would be 70% and in most communities its more like 90-95%). But not all greenfield is terrible. Great new communities can be created with careful and thoughtful planning such as Seaside and Kentlands.

A multi generational effort that our grandchildren's grandchildren will reap huge rewards from.
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Old 03-30-2013, 08:57 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post

A multi generational effort that our grandchildren's grandchildren will reap huge rewards from.
Sounds like the "urban renewal" rhetoric of the 1950s.
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:17 AM
 
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Well, sometimes "urban renewal" (that is, bulldozing and starting fresh) is justified. To use one of my favorite whipping posts, Orange NJ, most of what you see here: orange, nj - Google Maps has been bulldozed recently. I don't know if what they're replacing it with (new apartments, a mix of income-restricted and market rate... between railroad tracks and a major highway) will work out, but it's not like there was anything irreplaceable there (even the gas station had closed since the Street View was taken).

But of course Kohmet's plan is a recipe for disaster. Increase density while cutting transportation? Are you TRYING to create Calcutta?
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Sounds like the "urban renewal" rhetoric of the 1950s.
Urban planners have to think in 30 year increments. Rome was not build over night.

50 years of concerted effort to build the worlds most inefficient and ugly urban environments wont be corrected over night. It will take 25 years just to slow down the continued advancement of sprawl and another 75 years to rip it out and start over.

The rewards will be well worth it to future generations. We can only appreciate watching a work in progress knowing that the legacy we leave will be far greater than the unmitigated disaster that was left to us.
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:22 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,674,652 times
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Urban planners have to think in 30 year increments. Rome was not build over night.

50 years of concerted effort to build the worlds most inefficient and ugly urban environments wont be corrected over night. It will take 25 years just to slow down the continued advancement of sprawl and another 75 years to rip it out and start over.

The rewards will be well worth it to future generations. We can only appreciate watching a work in progress knowing that the legacy we leave will be far greater than the unmitigated disaster that was left to us.
LOL! That's what they said about "urban renewal" 60 years ago now.
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Well, sometimes "urban renewal" (that is, bulldozing and starting fresh) is justified. To use one of my favorite whipping posts, Orange NJ, most of what you see here: orange, nj - Google Maps has been bulldozed recently. I don't know if what they're replacing it with (new apartments, a mix of income-restricted and market rate... between railroad tracks and a major highway) will work out, but it's not like there was anything irreplaceable there (even the gas station had closed since the Street View was taken).

But of course Kohmet's plan is a recipe for disaster. Increase density while cutting transportation? Are you TRYING to create Calcutta?
See 2.
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:28 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
LOL! That's what they said about "urban renewal" 60 years ago now.
The prescription that holds the nose and says "it ain't so bad if you squint your eyes and kind of look away" doesn't take decades.

But then, it doesn't accomplish much either.
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:52 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,026,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Well, sometimes "urban renewal" (that is, bulldozing and starting fresh) is justified. To use one of my favorite whipping posts, Orange NJ, most of what you see here: orange, nj - Google Maps has been bulldozed recently. I don't know if what they're replacing it with (new apartments, a mix of income-restricted and market rate... between railroad tracks and a major highway) will work out, but it's not like there was anything irreplaceable there (even the gas station had closed since the Street View was taken).
Which part was demolished?

Quote:
But of course Kohmet's plan is a recipe for disaster. Increase density while cutting transportation? Are you TRYING to create Calcutta?
I didn't see anywhere where he suggested cutting transportation. "Road diets" are usually for roads where having a high volume of thorough traffic is a negative, such as a mostly residential side street, or a pedestrian oriented commercial center. For example, while Huntington Village, Long Island is a bit of a traffic bottleneck for through traffic, it matters little for cars driving there, you're searching for a place to park and then walking. Having fast moving traffic would make it an unpleasant place to walk around.
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Old 03-30-2013, 10:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Which part was demolished?
The service station, the two warehouses to the north and west of it, and on the other side of the north-south road (essex avenue), all the low buildings up to the railroad bridge (but not the large brick building).
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
The service station, the two warehouses to the north and west of it, and on the other side of the north-south road (essex avenue), all the low buildings up to the railroad bridge (but not the large brick building).
Correction, the service station and the white warehouse to the west weren't demolished (they had them literally covered up during demolition of the other buildings, but they're still there)
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