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Old 04-12-2013, 01:00 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'l restrain myself and say I think the benefits of trees outweigh the problems with them.
The OP didn't ask if trees are usually a negative, he asked if there can be cases when there are too many trees, which I agreed with.
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Old 04-12-2013, 01:34 PM
 
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That depends on if the cost can be paid in some instances. Trees need trimming to be safe in popualted areas as we saw when the storm hit new england. Here on hurricane coast people trim their tree at substantial cost as does power companies and cities. Poeple are very cauous as t what trees are panted where for most part here.Just trimmig without know what your doig can start the death of the tree and make it much more dangerous to have.
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Old 04-12-2013, 08:01 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Street trees can block views, can shade solar potential and can shade yards limiting gardens.
Again, the topic is STREET TREES! Street trees cannot shade back yard gardens, which is where most gardens are. Regarding solar potential, if you have solar collectors on the house, you either plant the flippin' trees so they don't shade the solar access, or you keep them trimmed. I don't really know what "view" a street tree can block.
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Old 04-12-2013, 08:06 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Street trees can block views, can shade solar potential and can shade yards limiting gardens.
Again, the topic is STREET TREES! Street trees cannot shade back yard gardens, which is where most gardens are. Regarding solar potential, if you have solar collectors on the house, you either plant the flippin' trees so they don't shade the solar access, or you keep them trimmed. I don't really know what "view" a street tree can block. Passive solar includes shading with trees.
Passive Solar Design Primer
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Old 04-12-2013, 08:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Again, the topic is STREET TREES! Street trees cannot shade back yard gardens, which is where most gardens are. Regarding solar potential, if you have solar collectors on the house, you either plant the flippin' trees so they don't shade the solar access, or you keep them trimmed. I don't really know what "view" a street tree can block.
-People plant things in their front yards too, have you heard of urban farming?
-In the city, with alleys, the garage and parking is often in the backyard, kinda the opposite of suburbs.
-Street trees can block sun on the front porch and front windows, passive solar has been used for centuries.
-Front yards are much smaller in the city than in the suburbs and street trees can be both big and close.

Last edited by nei; 04-12-2013 at 09:20 PM.. Reason: unnecessary
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Old 04-12-2013, 08:35 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
-People plant things in their front yards too, have you heard of urban farming?
-In the city, with alleys, the garage and parking is often in the backyard, kinda the opposite of suburbs.
-Street trees can block sun on the front porch and front windows, passive solar has been used for centuries.
-Front yards are much smaller in the city than in the suburbs and street trees can be both big and close.
The topic is STREET TREES! STREET TREES! STREET TREES!

The topic is not, what do people plant in their front yards. Yes, shockingly, I have heard of urban farming. I sure see a lot of it going on in Denver, NOT!

The topic is street trees, not alleys.

Trees are a part of passive solar. Shade trees reduce the use of air conditioning in the summer, and in the winter they do not have leaves so do not impede the solar gain. I am not an engineer but I can figure out that much. It's common sense. I see you did not look at my link, nor apparently, did you have any prior knowledge about the relationship of trees to passive solar.

Where the hell else would you put solar collectors except on a roof? Oh, I've seen banks of solar collectors on the ground in a few locations, but not for residential solar, especially in places with small yards.

In metro Denver the yards in the suburbs are not big, and the trees do not get very large.

Last edited by nei; 04-12-2013 at 09:21 PM..
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The topic is STREET TREES! STREET TREES! STREET TREES!

The topic is not, what do people plant in their front yards. Yes, shockingly, I have heard of urban farming. I sure see a lot of it going on in Denver, NOT!

The topic is street trees, not alleys.

Trees are a part of passive solar. Shade trees reduce the use of air conditioning in the summer, and in the winter they do not have leaves so do not impede the solar gain. I am not an engineer but I can figure out that much. It's common sense. I see you did not look at my link, nor apparently, did you have any prior knowledge about the relationship of trees to passive solar.

Where the hell else would you put solar collectors except on a roof? Oh, I've seen banks of solar collectors on the ground in a few locations, but not for residential solar, especially in places with small yards.

In metro Denver the yards in the suburbs are not big, and the trees do not get very large.
You might have read my post, but you certainly did not understand it or answer my question.
I was pointing out STREET TREES have consequences, both good and bad.
Not interested in a one way shouting match.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:43 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
It is. I don't think anyone said they wanted to. I want to see the houses not inside. I like old houses, I've posted photos of old houses in my neighborhood. I don't how saying "I like seeing houses in my neighborhoods" gets turn into "I want to look into my neighbor's windows".

And it's nice to be told I have issues.



As for solar, I was referring to direct sunlight into the room. Except for 2 months in summer, I'd consider a the cooling effect of trees more a negative than a positive.
I didn't say any particular person had "issues".

Regarding solar, the trees only block the sunlight when they have leaves on them. Here in metro Denver, trees are not fully leafed out until mid-May or so, and start losing their leaves in Sept., so they are only blocking the sun during the hottest months of the year.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
You might have read my post, but you certainly did not understand it or answer my question.
I was pointing out STREET TREES have consequences, both good and bad.
Not interested in a one way shouting match.
I am not stupid and I don't appreciate your comments about what I do or do not understand. The only question in your post was "have you heard of urban farming?" to which I did reply that I had heard of it.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:58 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 42,008,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I didn't say any particular person had "issues".
I guess I misread, though there were something negative in response to my desire to see houses which somehow got turned into a desire to look into my neighbor's windows.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't really know what "view" a street tree can block.
The OP gave an example of a somewhat block in the Pittsburgh street view, it was rather difficult to see the buildings of the street, except for maybe the closest ones, because the trees were so thick.

Quote:
Regarding solar, the trees only block the sunlight when they have leaves on them. Here in metro Denver, trees are not fully leafed out until mid-May or so, and start losing their leaves in Sept., so they are only blocking the sun during the hottest months of the year.
Yes, I know that. But I don't live metro Denver. At least a few of the months with the leaves out it's not particularly hot. Shade in general in usually good, but there are some downsides. And yea, if it's completely open or the house is in area with lots of concrete it's more liable to bake in the sun without trees.
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