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Old 04-12-2013, 10:37 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I am not stupid and I don't appreciate your comments about what I do or do not understand. The only question in your post was "have you heard of urban farming?" to which I did reply that I had heard of it.
Seems my second question was edited out.
My point was it is a very limited viewpoint to assume all gardens are in backyards and all solar is on rooftops.
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Old 04-12-2013, 11:17 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Seems my second question was edited out.
My point was it is a very limited viewpoint to assume all gardens are in backyards and all solar is on rooftops.
And where did I say that?

Urban Agrarianism : Are Americans ready for it?
Good.is: Redesigning the Front Yard: Replacing Lawns with Food, and Now Prairies

And in fact, in post #106 I addressed solar. Suppose YOU show some residential solar applications that aren't on rooftops.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 04-12-2013 at 11:30 PM..
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Old 04-13-2013, 07:14 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
And where did I say that?

Urban Agrarianism : Are Americans ready for it?
Good.is: Redesigning the Front Yard: Replacing Lawns with Food, and Now Prairies

And in fact, in post #106 I addressed solar. Suppose YOU show some residential solar applications that aren't on rooftops.
See post #105. Cities are different than suburbs. Lots are smaller, front yards are shallower and often the backyard is used for garage and/or parking.
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Old 04-13-2013, 07:17 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Here ya go:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Again, the topic is STREET TREES! Street trees cannot shade back yard gardens, which is where most gardens are. Regarding solar potential, if you have solar collectors on the house, you either plant the flippin' trees so they don't shade the solar access, or you keep them trimmed. I don't really know what "view" a street tree can block.
Are most gardens in the back? Depends on the neighborhood.
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Old 04-13-2013, 07:44 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Here ya go:



Are most gardens in the back? Depends on the neighborhood.
Yes, I said "most gardens" are in the back. Is this not true?

(Trying to think of how to say this right, OK?)

Of all the pictures people have posted of their neighborhoods, neighborhoods and street views in their city, etc, I have never seen one picture of a front yard garden. Now since the poster who is arguing lives in Denver, I will post some links with pictures of his fair city.

One of the "hippest" areas of Denver:
best areas to live in Denver
Just look at all the front yard gardens! I count, er, zero!

Condos around Cheesman Park
Another desirable area with the same number of front yard gardens.

Cherry Creek North: Shopping & Neighborhood -- PHOTO TOUR
Yet another. Do note the horror of a few unraked leaves in some of these pictures. Also note how the leaf-less trees are shading the buildings. Note also snow on the ground.

Downtown Denver --about 50 pics -- 4.13.2008
The hippest place in Denver to live.

Englewood / Arapahoe Acres / Mid-Century Modern -- Photo Tour
Gasp! Suburb! Hard to tell if there are any front yard gardens since there is snow on the lawns. Note how the trees are shading the homes, not.

Mediterranean / Tuscan Style Homes -- PHOTO TOUR
More suburbs with the same number of front gardens.

Xeriscaping in Denver: Smoky Hill PHOTO TOUR
Pretty suburban. Note trees in full leaf (gasp!).

Berkeley, Lakeside and Regis Neighborhoods -- PHOTO TOUR

Regis University and Hilltop area -- PHOTO TOUR
West Highlands Neighborhood -- PHOTO TOUR
Hilltop Neighborhood, Historic Denver Modern/Mid-Century Homes -- PHOTO TOUR
OMG! Look at this horrid shaded patio in the very first picture!
South & SE Denver -- PHOTO TOUR
Platt Park area (Old South Pearl) -- Photo Tour
My fave. Look at these despicable street trees.

Note how these street trees interfere with the growing of grass, bushes, flowers, etc, in all these pictures.

Plus much more in this thread:

Official Index - Key Threads - PHOTO TOURS

This is really a ridiculous argument against trees. If you have a front yard and a back yard, and there's a tree in front shading your lawn, you can put the garden in back. The benefits of the tree for decreased cooling in summer probably outweigh the issue of having to site the garden in back. The produce would be a little safer in back, as well.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 04-13-2013 at 08:12 AM..
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Old 04-13-2013, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
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I have two huge trees looming over my backyard, and our garden has grown fine for years.
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Old 04-13-2013, 09:32 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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I looked back at the links in the first few posts; not a garden in a front yard among 'em. I also thought I'd repost this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
I agree. Trees add a softness and vibe to a street that cannot be accomplished with concrete alone.
Nor have I seen any solar collectors in front yards in any of these links.

ETA: I don't usually use my husband's credentials to support my opinions here on CD (mostly b/c he thinks CD is ridiculous, but also because I hate it when someone says "My husband said"), but. . .

My husband used to be a partner in a solar energy start up company. He knows quite a bit about the technology. I asked him, just now, if most solar systems are roof mounted. He said yes to the vast majority, and that a yard-mounted system would take up the whole front yard and it would be ridiculous to install it that way.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 04-13-2013 at 09:46 AM..
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:07 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I looked back at the links in the first few posts; not a garden in a front yard among 'em. I also thought I'd repost this:



Nor have I seen any solar collectors in front yards in any of these links.

ETA: I don't usually use my husband's credentials to support my opinions here on CD (mostly b/c he thinks CD is ridiculous, but also because I hate it when someone says "My husband said"), but. . .

My husband used to be a partner in a solar energy start up company. He knows quite a bit about the technology. I asked him, just now, if most solar systems are roof mounted. He said yes to the vast majority, and that a yard-mounted system would take up the whole front yard and it would be ridiculous to install it that way.
Since you did not bother to reread my post (#105) I will point out once again.
Not all solar uses are "collectors on roofs" (either thermal or PV).
Most solar benefits are "passive solar", no rooftop required.
And I realize solar energy is most benefical in the winter when most street trees are bare.
But the crown of a good size street tree creates substantial shading even in winter.

And I am not arguing against street trees, I just pointing out that they have consequences.
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:27 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Since you did not bother to reread my post (#105) I will point out once again.
Not all solar uses are "collectors on roofs" (either thermal or PV).
Most solar benefits are "passive solar", no rooftop required.
And I realize solar energy is most benefical in the winter when most street trees are bare.
But the crown of a good size street tree creates substantial shading even in winter.

And I am not arguing against street trees, I just pointing out that they have consequences.
I've read all your posts. You keep 'moving the goalposts', and you obviously have not read mine for comprehension.

Most active solar systems are roof-mounted. Period. So you plant your trees where the shade won't interfere with them.

Trees are a part of passive solar design. I posted a link.

Actually, active solar is more efficient in the summer when the sun shines more (in most climates).

In the links posted by many people on this thread, there is not much evidence of significant shading of houses by tree limbs in the winter. Houses seem to be shaded more by other buildings than trees.
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Old 04-13-2013, 12:49 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yes, I said "most gardens" are in the back. Is this not true?
I'm not sure, I thought that was an overgeneralization. Perhaps because my parents had more of a garden in the front than the back for years [not posting a photo of it]. I've seen many front gardens in my neighborhood.

Quote:
Of all the pictures people have posted of their neighborhoods, neighborhoods and street views in their city, etc, I have never seen one picture of a front yard garden.
I've definitely posted a few a while back. Here's some in my neighborhood, a few of these photos I have posted before, most not.









This house doesn't really have a back:



and a house out of town:



some in Ithaca:



just flowers along a fence but a bit garden-like:



the space between the front and street is landscaped:



underneath the arch:



on the other side:



Now on to big cities. Boston.



making the best use of the space they have:



Philadelphia:







I saw others that looked they would have gardens if the season was right.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I looked back at the links in the first few posts; not a garden in a front yard among 'em.
Many of the views didn't have any space in the front to fit a garden. None of my NYC views had much of any setback to have space for a front garden. The most you might be able to get is something like this:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=16th+...37.42,,0,-1.65

Note the street trees. The gardens seem to manage but perhaps if the canopy from the street trees were too thick, some sun-loving plants would have trouble, though the natural cooling benefits are appreciated with all the concrete there. The OP's view of the Pittsburgh street might be under the category of too much trees for a garden.
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