U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-15-2013, 07:45 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't think Cleveland is *that* badly off.
Perhaps, but can the city even contact the property owner? He/she may have left the city or state, have not paid property taxes in many years. The property owner could be a bankrupt shell corporation. As the whole block is abandoned, it's probably low on the city's priorities.

They look like they've been abandoned for a long time, considering the size of the trees in front of the apartment building entrances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Looks more like an example of too many buildings than too many trees. I don't see how the trees are causing any issues. I guess in the fall when the leaves fall since the neighborhood is abandoned... but then, even when they're not you go into some lower-class neighborhoods that have hit a tipping point and everyone has the mentality of why should I lift a finger.
Well, if someone actually lived in the buildings, their view out the window would be completely blocked. Very little light. I know many here have stated cooling is very important, but that's just excessive. Of course, since no lives in the buildings, no one cares that the view is blocked.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-15-2013, 08:08 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Perhaps, but can the city even contact the property owner? He/she may have left the city or state, have not paid property taxes in many years. The property owner could be a bankrupt shell corporation. As the whole block is abandoned, it's probably low on the city's priorities.

They look like they've been abandoned for a long time, considering the size of the trees in front of the apartment building entrances.



Well, if someone actually lived in the buildings, their view out the window would be completely blocked. Very little light. I know many here have stated cooling is very important, but that's just excessive. Of course, since no lives in the buildings, no one cares that the view is blocked.
I guess the city of Cleveland could just prune the trees themselves. Surely they have some groundskeepers that work in their parks, etc.

Since no one is living in those homes, it's irrelevant the views from the windows are blocked.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2013, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,593 posts, read 6,375,300 times
Reputation: 2388
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
This city street [found in another thread] is an example of too many street trees.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=1750+...G0ck-JFUKyJwWg

But too many street trees are the least of its problems.
With buildings that look as bad as that, I say the less we see of them the better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Presumably someone owns the property. Get the property owner to cut them back. That's what they do here.
Why? It's not as if they're harming anybody by letting the trees grow on their yard. They're not even obstructing the view for local traffic. Just let them be. In any case, since it's abandoned I doubt the owner cares what's done to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2013, 07:27 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
With buildings that look as bad as that, I say the less we see of them the better.



Why? It's not as if they're harming anybody by letting the trees grow on their yard. They're not even obstructing the view for local traffic. Just let them be. In any case, since it's abandoned I doubt the owner cares what's done to it.
While I am in agreement with you, if it's such a problem as some posters here seem to think, the obvious solution is to make the owners trim the trees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2013, 08:05 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,803 posts, read 10,711,160 times
Reputation: 2522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
So walk in the street.
huh? Im neither suggesting where to walk, nor what should be done about these. The title of the thread is can there be too many street trees, and someone posted this shot, I presume to answer yes. My point was that unlike the trees in the trees in the OP, these do not provide shade. The costs and benefits of short side trees/shurbs, that may provide privacy to adjoining houses, but do not add shade for pedestrians, and can when untrimmed obstruct the sidewalk, are different from the issues of shade trees. Ergo, a picture like this does not really speak to the issues raised by the OP.

It was not to complain about unshaded walks in east Cleveland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2013, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,656,879 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
Looking at the units across the street, I would suggest that for whatever reasons (resources?) the city of Cleveland is NOT really keeping on the property owners to follow local codes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't think Cleveland is *that* badly off.
FWIW, the city of East Cleveland--the suburb of Cleveland where the streetview was taken from--probably doesn't have the resources to address this kind of blight.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2013, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,593 posts, read 6,375,300 times
Reputation: 2388
Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
My point was that unlike the trees in the trees in the OP, these do not provide shade. The costs and benefits of short side trees/shurbs, that may provide privacy to adjoining houses, but do not add shade for pedestrians, and can when untrimmed obstruct the sidewalk, are different from the issues of shade trees. Ergo, a picture like this does not really speak to the issues raised by the OP.
All good points. However, I would say that trees that only provide privacy do offer some benefit, but it's even better to offer privacy and shade for the pedestrians. Unfortunately, these trees don't* offer shade, and in any case trees are the least of this place's problems. I also agree that it is a somewhat different issue than the OP raised.

*Somehow I didn't even notice that when I first looked at it .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2013, 08:54 AM
 
7,596 posts, read 9,450,003 times
Reputation: 8955
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
FWIW, the city of East Cleveland--the suburb of Cleveland where the streetview was taken from--probably doesn't have the resources to address this kind of blight.
Probably true, especially if the neighborhoods are basically uninhabited...

I'm sure that those neighborhoods were quite nice at one time, probably when Cleveland's many manufacturing plants were humming full-tilt..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2013, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,656,879 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Probably true, especially if the neighborhoods are basically uninhabited...

I'm sure that those neighborhoods were quite nice at one time, probably when Cleveland's many manufacturing plants were humming full-tilt..
You can say that again. John D. Rockefeller once called East Cleveland his home. (though not in the neighborhood in the streetview )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2013, 11:10 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
You can say that again. John D. Rockefeller once called East Cleveland his home. (though not in the neighborhood in the streetview )
Hmm. He grew up in Upstate NY. I may have gone a bike ride a few miles from his birthplace.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top