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Old 11-02-2013, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
To be nitpicky, many of those houses don't look particularly New England-style. The trees also looks like different species than northeastern trees.
Midwestern?
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Old 11-02-2013, 11:07 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xeric View Post
Midwestern?
Dunno, some could fit in New England, others not particularly. It doesn't actually seem that atypical from what I'd expect of older California.
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Old 11-02-2013, 11:09 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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anyhow, how bothered are people by the lack of street trees on this commercial street?

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brook...,,0,-2.77&z=15

Move up and down a bit, not sure if I picked the best view.
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Old 11-02-2013, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Dunno, some could fit in New England, others not particularly. It doesn't actually seem that atypical from what I'd expect of older California.
Perhaps. But take a look at this street view of Mountain Ave. in Fort Collins. No palm trees but otherwise a lot of similarities.

https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...819658941,,0,0

Although after looking around the Sacramento street scenes in a little more detail, I will concede that there are at least some buildings that are somewhat different in appearance from eastern-style old housing stock.
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Old 11-03-2013, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,078,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
anyhow, how bothered are people by the lack of street trees on this commercial street?

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brook...,,0,-2.77&z=15

Move up and down a bit, not sure if I picked the best view.
What exactly do you mean by bothered?

It's an ugly street, which my or may not be a problem. Typically ugly isn't a problem for liquor stores and 99 cent store type places, which is what there was there before. As it gentrifies some people might be bothered by it being ugly, but it's Brooklyn. Beggars can't be choosers. Brooklyn in general is people who don't have the means to live in Manhattan and got pushed out. It used to be a rougher, blue-collar town so it looks very utilitarian.
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Old 11-03-2013, 06:35 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
What exactly do you mean by bothered?

It's an ugly street, which my or may not be a problem. Typically ugly isn't a problem for liquor stores and 99 cent store type places, which is what there was there before.
As in finds the lack of street trees makes a big difference in its appearance, or ugly because of the lack of street trees. It sounds like you do, but it's unclear whether the lack of street trees is the issue for you. In my opinion, it's not exactly a beautiful, but I wouldn't call it ugly, in fact, nicer looking (and more interesting) than most suburban commercial streets.

What was there before? It never was a bad neighborhood, just working class. It had a lot ethnic polish shops, some remain. here's one, most are scattered:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brook...1,,0,4.16&z=17

perhaps this view might look nicer looking to people.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brook...,,0,-1.85&z=16
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xeric View Post
Interesting responses. Regarding climates. I consider Mediterranian to be a subset of subtropical (not a different category). A subtropical climate has winter frosts but they are short-lived and far less of a limitation on plant life than the persistent frosts of temperate zone winters. There are many, many, broadleafed evergreens that have a large shade canopy that could be used in place of the New England tree species in Sacramento. Potential sources for those trees are California, New Zealand, the southern U.S., Australia, southern China, southern Japan, and the Mediterranean itself. Their lack of use in Sacramento strikes me more as evidence of lack of imagination and of habit then of any sort of practicality.
The Mediterranean Sea is entirely within the northern temperate zone, not the subtropical zone, so I will respectfully disagree. It's a subset of the temperate zone, just the warmer part thereof. Southern California is in the subtropical zone, Northern California is not. The use of Northeastern trees started out as a pragmatic adaptation by arborists who came from the Northeast, but there are also reasons why subtropical trees don't work out well. Magnolias grow okay in this climate, but in our dry summer air, the magnolia blossoms always look wilted (the higher humidity of the South makes them look a lot better.) Eucalyptus was used a lot in southern California and the Bay Area, but they are a horrendous fire hazard and, as mentioned above, not much good for shade. As the first generation of trees has died out, there has been some shift in tree plantings, including more use of native California trees. And our tree canopy isn't without some Asian and European plantings; they just tend to be trees better suited to our Medtierranean/temperate climate.


Quote:
Yes there are multiple "Californias" but Sacramento is far closer (by most measures) to it's in-state neighbors than it is to most other regions of the country. Considering that the majority of the country is emulating the eastern U.S. in look and feel, it doesn't seem unreasonable to expect (and enjoy) some variation (and an expanded landscaping pallet) in an area that doesn't suffer from the climatic limitations of the northern, central, and interior U.S.
Emulating Eastern cities in style was a common practice in most 19th century Western cities; these were "instant" cities, bounding from nothing to tens of thousands of people in just a few years. Cities like San Francisco, Sacramento, Portland, and later Los Angeles and San Diego, wanted to quickly give the impression of familiarity to Eastern settlers. And, as I mentioned above, there were and are some very definite architectural variations in western cities like Sacramento (use of wood vs. brick or stone, Craftsman styles and other western styles) that set cities like Sacramento apart from their Eastern counterparts. In general, roofs are less steeply pitched here than in snowy climates (steep roof pitch helps snow slide off a roof rather than accumulate) and we tend to have wide porches, again to provide shade, instead of "mud rooms" which we don't need.

Quote:
Originally Posted by xeric View Post
They should truck in some snow from the Sierra to go along with those New England houses.
Because we are only two hours west of the Sierra Nevada range, which gets an awful lot of snow, it's not uncommon to see cars and trucks coming back from ski trips with "cargoes" of snow on the roof and pickup bed.
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Old 11-03-2013, 11:00 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
The Mediterranean Sea is entirely within the northern temperate zone, not the subtropical zone, so I will respectfully disagree. It's a subset of the temperate zone, just the warmer part thereof. Southern California is in the subtropical zone, Northern California is not.
In the eastern US, you'd have to go as far as south as South Carolina to get winters as mild as Sacramento's.

Columbia, South Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

or Alabama:

Birmingham, Alabama - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

both usually considered subtropical
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Old 11-03-2013, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,078,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
As in finds the lack of street trees makes a big difference in its appearance, or ugly because of the lack of street trees. It sounds like you do, but it's unclear whether the lack of street trees is the issue for you. In my opinion, it's not exactly a beautiful, but I wouldn't call it ugly, in fact, nicer looking (and more interesting) than most suburban commercial streets.

What was there before? It never was a bad neighborhood, just working class. It had a lot ethnic polish shops, some remain. here's one, most are scattered:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brook...1,,0,4.16&z=17

perhaps this view might look nicer looking to people.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brook...,,0,-1.85&z=16
Both.

Buildings are run down and deteriorated and don't have much adornment. You're starting to see a few boutique shops, and I suspect they're more recent additions. Or anyway, they tend to be the ones that actually maintain the buildings since vanity shoppers are, well, rather vain. The neighborhood as the whole, however, is kind of drab and rundown. That doesn't mean there's crackheads shooting each other for corner space or it's a bad neighborhood. It's just kind of ugly. Does it bother me? Not really all that much. It's kind of like a big parking lot in front of a strip mall. Sure, it's ugly, but so what? I'm not that snooty.
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Old 11-03-2013, 02:43 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post

Emulating Eastern cities in style was a common practice in most 19th century Western cities; these were "instant" cities, bounding from nothing to tens of thousands of people in just a few years. Cities like San Francisco, Sacramento, Portland, and later Los Angeles and San Diego, wanted to quickly give the impression of familiarity to Eastern settlers. And, as I mentioned above, there were and are some very definite architectural variations in western cities like Sacramento (use of wood vs. brick or stone, Craftsman styles and other western styles) that set cities like Sacramento apart from their Eastern counterparts. In general, roofs are less steeply pitched here than in snowy climates (steep roof pitch helps snow slide off a roof rather than accumulate) and we tend to have wide porches, again to provide shade, instead of "mud rooms" which we don't need..
According to this article, Craftsman styles started in Boston. Bungalows are quite popular from Chicago west.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Craftsman
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