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Old 11-03-2013, 09:07 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Both.

Buildings are run down and deteriorated and don't have much adornment. You're starting to see a few boutique shops, and I suspect they're more recent additions. Or anyway, they tend to be the ones that actually maintain the buildings since vanity shoppers are, well, rather vain.
Odd. I can't notice a run down look or any deterioration. Walked on that street several times, too.Some of them have a bit of adornment on the top, and there's this Rite-Aid, and its neighbors have a bit. Some buildings might be a bit worn, but that doesn't necessarily mean it makes it unattractive. I also like old brick buildings in general.

Quote:
Does it bother me? Not really all that much. It's kind of like a big parking lot in front of a strip mall. Sure, it's ugly, but so what? I'm not that snooty.
But I won't consider them similar; I don't find that street ugly, and at the very least somewhat interesting looking. A strip mall filled commercial street would be far uglier to me. A few are ok, but I'd like to not live in a place that have lots streets I'd consider eyesores. Sounds like you have a different idea of ugly than I do.
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Old 11-03-2013, 11:06 PM
 
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Arts & crafts ideas took root in Boston but really took off as they went farther west. "Bungalow" is more of a general house form usually a single-story or 1.5 story, with a low-slung plan (as opposed to the boxier foursquare.) "Craftsman" is a particular style of bungalow (there are also Neoclassic bungalows, etcetera) but Craftsman styles could also be applied to foursquares.

Chicago has its own style of Chicago Bungalow, predominantly brick rather than wood and with smaller porches. while there are several archetypal California bungalows, including the Greene & Greene inspired "bungaloid" giants, the later stucco "California bungalows" with complex, low-pitched roof lines, and the more commonplace Craftsman bungalow with projecting rafter tails. Very few styles are limited to one particular geographic area, but Craftsman bungalows tend to predominate farther west, while the same house form (bungalows) tend to follow Wrightian architectural modes (the Prairie School) farther east. But you see a little of each--there are Prairie School and Colonial Revival homes in Sacramento, and Spanish Colonial Revival homes in Chicago.

But anyhow, trees. Bungalows were supposed to be derived form local materials (thus the Chicago ones tend to be brick, the California ones redwood or stucco, etc.) and horizontal to allow the landscaping to take center stage. They were supposed to kind of "vanish in the forest" once the landscaping matured.
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Old 11-04-2013, 10:12 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Here's a German street that's similar to the OP's street in the "trees blocking light and views of the buildings":

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Berli...20.63,,0,-17.1
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Old 11-04-2013, 10:36 AM
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Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^Ah, but it's in Europe, so it's OK. (Sarc)
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Old 01-30-2019, 01:25 PM
 
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Prague has fewer city streets and I got depressed there as I'm from Sofia, one of the greenest capitals. I took tree canopies in the city for granted. Trees promote well-being. It's not true that all streets in Old Town in Prague are too small to accomodate trees. Many can accomodate them. Budapest seems greener at least on street view. Also, Athens is an example of a city where even the tiny streets are tree-lined. Czech and Slovak cities and towns in general have fewer tree-lined streets than Hungarian, Bulgarian and even Polish ones. In Germany Munich seems to me the one with the most tree-lined streets, followed by Berlin. In the Netherlands, the most tree-lined streets are to be found in Veenendaal. Other Dutch cities, save for Amsterdam lack lots of street trees. Same for British cities - lots of parks but very few tree-lined streets in the City of London for example. But OK, it makes sense for their climate. But I was surprised how little tree-lined streets there are in most Spanish and aven more in Italian cities. You'd expect them to be green as Athens to provide shade for pedestrians but nope.
Imo, the more tree-lined streets, the better. I don't need parks that much. Fewer parks, but loads of tree lined streets are better than many small parks but tree-less streets in my book. Trees lower the pollution and noise from traffic. They also psychologically isolate pedestrians from it.

I think Sofia, followed by Budapest are the capitals in Europe with the most tree-lined streets. Sofia actually has MORE tree-lined streets in the city center rather than in the suburbs, believe it or not, bucking the trends of green suburbs but bare city centers in Europe!
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Old 01-30-2019, 03:29 PM
 
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Prague was rather stark and unfriendly, very few trees. Visit Sofia or Budapest instead.
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Old 01-30-2019, 10:53 PM
 
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London is lacking in trees on its streets, especially in urban town centres, but the city is peppered with garden squares and parks. Also, vertical gardens have been introduced to provide some greenery and some splash of colour in its streetscape, like the ones below. Thanks to social media "influencers", these have been fueled partly due to the marketing power of Instagram with businesses decorating their shopfront with flowers.

Garden Walls of London



























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Old 01-31-2019, 05:49 AM
 
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Wow that's fantastic! I hope it catches on in Prague. The rows of similar old houses with no flowers or greenery are not nice. I think Germans at least put shrubs and flower pots where the space is limited. Polish cities are generally greener than Czech and Slovak ones. They even put pots on Nowy Sviat street while I can only wish Obchodna in Bratislava had some.
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Old 01-31-2019, 11:00 AM
 
3,214 posts, read 1,546,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Arts & crafts ideas took root in Boston but really took off as they went farther west. "Bungalow" is more of a general house form usually a single-story or 1.5 story, with a low-slung plan (as opposed to the boxier foursquare.) "Craftsman" is a particular style of bungalow (there are also Neoclassic bungalows, etcetera) but Craftsman styles could also be applied to foursquares.

Chicago has its own style of Chicago Bungalow, predominantly brick rather than wood and with smaller porches. while there are several archetypal California bungalows, including the Greene & Greene inspired "bungaloid" giants, the later stucco "California bungalows" with complex, low-pitched roof lines, and the more commonplace Craftsman bungalow with projecting rafter tails. Very few styles are limited to one particular geographic area, but Craftsman bungalows tend to predominate farther west, while the same house form (bungalows) tend to follow Wrightian architectural modes (the Prairie School) farther east. But you see a little of each--there are Prairie School and Colonial Revival homes in Sacramento, and Spanish Colonial Revival homes in Chicago.

But anyhow, trees. Bungalows were supposed to be derived form local materials (thus the Chicago ones tend to be brick, the California ones redwood or stucco, etc.) and horizontal to allow the landscaping to take center stage. They were supposed to kind of "vanish in the forest" once the landscaping matured.
Yes, very true. The AMERICAN version of the bungalow home.... was a trait f the evolving middle-class that utilized modern conveniences that were embraced. Both LA and Chicago evolved their versions. LA's were generally larger and wood-framed. Chicago's of course... virtually all brick with Frank Lloyd Wright inspired features and some use of stinted glass Tiffany promoted.

Green-frontage standard with many in Chicago tree-lined. Some preferred more the front-lawn effect. 1/3 that city is technically considered its bungalow-belt of late teens thru the 1920s 30s when 80,000 were built and still stand proud. Then later 40s thru 60s versions took over.

To me NEVER TOO MANY TREES. Love Chicago's oldest neighborhoods of soaring front trees that give a truly walkable PLEASANT one.

To Europeans though. Bungalow areas are not urban but suburban. But US standards with added apartment buildings also that era.... added density and Chicago's were on small city-sized lots. But one could see suburban attributes begin.

Early 20th century for the emerging US middle-class urbanity 1920s 30s.
Also some later examples and most sought after pre-dating bungalow Cottage-homes. 19-teens
Area's of densest Chicago TREE-EMBRACED URBAN aerial views. For American standards.
Attached Thumbnails
Is there such thing as too many street trees?-bungalows-chicago.....jpg   Is there such thing as too many street trees?-chicago-classic-bungalows..jpg   Is there such thing as too many street trees?-chicago-bungalows...jpg   Is there such thing as too many street trees?-chicago-bungalows-.jpg   Is there such thing as too many street trees?-chicago-late-50s-singles....jpg  

Is there such thing as too many street trees?-chicago-1960s-homes...jpg   Is there such thing as too many street trees?-chicago-cottage-home-lakeview-today-...jpg   Is there such thing as too many street trees?-neighborhood-chicago-worker-cottage-homes-today   Is there such thing as too many street trees?-looking-toward-downtown-chicago-density-..jpg   Is there such thing as too many street trees?-over-green-chicago.-..jpg  

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Old 02-01-2019, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,213,027 times
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Rostov-on-Don is an example of a city removing an old treelined street and replacing it with a new pedestrian only street with new younger trees, it looks very nice and the beautiful architecture is able to shine through.

Before
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2195...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2196...7i13312!8i6656

After
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2195...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2196...7i13312!8i6656
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