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Old 02-02-2019, 09:56 PM
 
3,222 posts, read 1,551,871 times
Reputation: 2352

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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
Rostov-on-Don is an example of a city removing an old treelined street and replacing it with a new pedestrian only street with new younger trees, it looks very nice and the beautiful architecture is able to shine through.

Before
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2195...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2196...7i13312!8i6656

After
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2195...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2196...7i13312!8i6656
Can definately see the oversized tree and others even on such a narrow sidewalk was just too much and biggest tree unsafe too.

But there is still something to be said for neighborhoods as this where fronts are big enough for its soaring trees.
But it is true, some can hide homes from the street.

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9227...7i16384!8i8192

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9225...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9230...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9190...7i16384!8i8192

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9442...7i16384!8i8192
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Old 02-02-2019, 11:47 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,930 posts, read 2,215,703 times
Reputation: 2610
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Can definately see the oversized tree and others even on such a narrow sidewalk was just too much and biggest tree unsafe too.

But there is still something to be said for neighborhoods as this where fronts are big enough for its soaring trees.
But it is true, some can hide homes from the street.

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9227...7i16384!8i8192

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9225...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9230...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9190...7i16384!8i8192

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9442...7i16384!8i8192
Those look really nice. In general I love large trees that create a canopy over the street, so long as branches are way up there. and the canopy isn't too dense allowing a lot of light through.


Sadly Seattle doesn't have that many streets with closed canopies. Here is an example though in pioneer square

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6002...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 02-03-2019, 12:35 AM
 
650 posts, read 311,983 times
Reputation: 1004
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
Those look really nice. In general I love large trees that create a canopy over the street, so long as branches are way up there. and the canopy isn't too dense allowing a lot of light through.


Sadly Seattle doesn't have that many streets with closed canopies. Here is an example though in pioneer square

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6002...7i13312!8i6656
Same here. For cities that tend to have quite a bit of overcast days, dense canopies can make the street look a bit more gloomy.

The only street in London I can think of that has this would be Northumberland Ave, and maybe the one outside the British Museum.
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Old 02-03-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Get off my lawn?
613 posts, read 218,105 times
Reputation: 681
I remember many a dreary day during a Berlin winter, but it was more having it overcast for literally months on end. I actually liked the trees. It made for a pretty spring and a cooler summer. If you have a Main Street in your urban center called Unter den Linden, you should live up to it:
https://goo.gl/maps/f6SyX3PZygP2
Not really a canopy in that downtown location, but as you go west into the greener inner suburbs, you can really get some street tree cover...this from the Zehlendorf locality:
https://goo.gl/maps/zAhLLbCfj9z

I recall some great urban tree-lined streets in southwestern Germany—cities like Stuttgart and Freiburg, which shouldn’t be surprising given proximity to the Black Forest. The Buda side of Budapest in Hungary is quite green as well.

Closer to my home, I’m very fortunate to benefit from numerous tree lined and canopied streets. Raleigh, North Carolina is known as “The City of Oaks,” and is consistently named a Tree City USA. Spring bloom and Autumn color changes are really quite something.

Our Main Street leading to the State Capitol building is called Hillsborough St., and is quite scenic and green for 3/4 of the year. The cover does obscure some of the skyline views, but it is so worth it with the lush and calming green, and provides some much needed natural shade and pollution control on steamy Southern days:
https://goo.gl/maps/Ym61AknLfAU2

The tree lined streets even extend outside of downtown proper into our, at least former, “Streetcar Suburbs” and beyond. This is Glenwood Avenue near the Five Points neighborhood. A streetcar line used to run up here from downtown a century ago. Remnants of the rail are still buried in the asphalt of what is now a major motorway into and out of downtown. Though the streetcar line is gone, a former streetcar shelter remains, as does the tree canopy. While the city is still very much auto-centric, it takes its urban forestry fairly seriously...
https://goo.gl/maps/sUkCLLmxoLp

The tree canopy can have its downsides, however. In the Autumn it takes quite an effort to remove the leaves from our city. The city has a leaf collection program, but often the leaves will sit in piles blocking right of way for weeks, worse if it is rainy/snowy. In the Spring, allergies abound. In Hurricane season and in Winter during heavy wet snow or ice storms is where the biggest problems fall (literally). A large limb or uprooted tree can wreck havoc on above ground utility lines and homes. It is a constant effort to keep things pruned back on private property, in the utility right-of-way, and on city owned land. Nature still happens. We have “tree law” to sort things out. I’m still OK with it.
https://goo.gl/maps/ywfEa1LyUHH2
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Old 02-03-2019, 08:43 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovelondon View Post
Same here. For cities that tend to have quite a bit of overcast days, dense canopies can make the street look a bit more gloomy.

The only street in London I can think of that has this would be Northumberland Ave, and maybe the one outside the British Museum.
Maybe that's the OP's issue. He lives in Pittsburgh, a particularly gloomy city.
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