U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-06-2013, 07:10 AM
 
239 posts, read 475,266 times
Reputation: 253

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
Power lines need to be buried like they are in most of the developed world. As long as power lines are above ground, there will be issues with weather. Using power lines as an excuse to cut down or not plant trees, is perverse. Most utility companies spend more money cutting trees on their easements, then they would in the long run to just bury the lines. The customers pay the price. Not only with unsightly wires, but with unreliable utility service.

----------"the customers pay the price",,,,,,,,,,

Yes, and I'm sick of paying for tree trimming due to ignorance of people planting trees and not taking into consideration that little trees grow into big trees,
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-06-2013, 07:30 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,715,010 times
Reputation: 2538
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Nei has posted tons of overheads of European cities in the past, and it's a common form. Look at Prague, for an extreme example. Or Budapest, Vienna, Berlin, Paris, Zurich, etc.

The common European urban typology is to often have complete buildings which occupy the street wall on all sides, but to have a "hollow block" with a central courtyard. Often some, or quite a lot, of greenery is tucked in the middle.

You made an assertion that in Europe they don't put trees on streets. I just posted pictures of some of Europes most very famous streets including Champs Élysées, Via Veneto, and Las Ramblas all clearly showing a practice of tree lined streets that in fact is common throughout Europe.

Such a strange strange assertion you make.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 07:50 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I don't understand why you and others keep misinterpreting what I'm saying. I like trees a lot. I grew up in an area which was covered in forest. Most cities and neighborhoods could do better with a lot more trees. I just don't think they complement every single style of architecture and every urban typology.

Hell, in parts of the world which are arid, and street trees would require extensive watering (Arizona for example) all of the environmental arguments about them kinda go out the window.

The modern focus on street trees making everything better, regardless of context in some ways reminds me of some of the urban renewal ideas from the mid 20th century. Street trees are considered desirable in part because they've become an indicator of wealthy, long-stable or recently gentrified urban areas, and there is a strong correlation between overall wealth and number of street trees. While they can beautify blighted neighborhoods, I'm not sure they will have any more luck with social stability than either "tear down the tenements and build modern towers" or "tear down the towers and build suburban housing" did.

Oh, and here's something about the savanna hypothesis.
I didn't think we were talking about Arizona. Yes, there are a few places where trees don't work.

I don't think this harrangue is about wealth or social stability. "They make an area look too suburban". And god knows we can't have that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 07:50 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,715,010 times
Reputation: 2538
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Nei has posted tons of overheads of European cities in the past, and it's a common form. Look at Prague, for an extreme example. Or Budapest, Vienna, Berlin, Paris, Zurich, etc.

The common European urban typology is to often have complete buildings which occupy the street wall on all sides, but to have a "hollow block" with a central courtyard. Often some, or quite a lot, of greenery is tucked in the middle.
Budapest

http://www.budapestsightseeing.net/w...ndrassyut1.jpg

http://farm1.staticflickr.com/177/47...4c5a297d_z.jpg

Vienna:

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/P1080686.JPG

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_6xm7Bnhixw...0/IMG_0594.jpg

Berlin

http://photos.nondot.org/2002-06-14-...n%20Street.jpg

http://static.waytostay.us/media/apa...1813_large.jpg

Paris

http://smartphonewallpaper.com/wallp...et-960x854.jpg

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/...04_674365c.jpg

Zurich

http://cdn3.vtourist.com/4/6456442-B...se_Zuerich.jpg

http://images.huffingtonpost.com/201...viewZurich.jpg

yup, they sure don't have tree lined urban streets in Budapest, Vienna, Berlin, Paris or Zurich. . .

Last edited by nei; 07-06-2013 at 10:39 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 08:01 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
You made an assertion that in Europe they don't put trees on streets. I just posted pictures of some of Europes most very famous streets including Champs Élysées, Via Veneto, and Las Ramblas all clearly showing a practice of tree lined streets that in fact is common throughout Europe.

Such a strange strange assertion you make.
And on residential streets? Check my previous post of the French street view. Look around at the neighboring streets. Some streets have a few trees many do not. You can find that pattern in many European cities. Though a skim of Munich, it looked like except for right by the city center, streets had trees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 08:03 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
It was certainly true of the cities where I was in the countries I mentioned that there were few trees in the cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 08:04 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

I don't think this harrangue is about wealth or social stability. "They make an area look too suburban". And god knows we can't have that.
I've heard suburbanites complain that a change might their place look too much like a city, so the reverse could be reasonable. As to wealth, a few posters have posted that more trees is rather correlated with wealthier neighborhoods. The OP seems to be making a case that there may be cases where you have too many street trees. I partially agreed, suggesting pruning and also gave an example of a view where I'd want no trees on the first page.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 08:05 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It was certainly true of the cities where I was in the countries I mentioned that there were few trees in the cities.
On the street. Many might have been behind buildings as I showed earlier (look at all my links!)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 08:06 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
On the street. Many might have been behind buildings as I showed earlier (look at all my links!)
I have looked at some of your links. I've also been behind buildings in way western Germany. Most of those apartment buildings smack up against the street had a concrete courtyard in back. I will say there were more trees in Germany than the other two (Belgium and the Netherlands).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2013, 09:25 AM
 
7,596 posts, read 9,450,003 times
Reputation: 8955
Count me in on the side of more trees, regardless of an urban or suburban setting. Treeless streets come across as stark and unfriendly..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top