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Old 04-07-2013, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Paris
8,133 posts, read 6,682,315 times
Reputation: 3371

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
And some locals still criticize it:
What I don't like about Haussmann's redevelopment scheme is the tedious, repetitive architecture, not the urban form per se, which is fine by me ("very urban", no setbacks, high density...).

Btw, here are some treed nondescript streets. Yes, they exist.
http://img832.imageshack.us/img832/51/p1010740cf.jpg
http://img547.imageshack.us/img547/362/p1010741q.jpg
http://img716.imageshack.us/img716/3640/p1010746v.jpg
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Old 04-07-2013, 11:30 PM
 
Location: NC
10,005 posts, read 9,020,659 times
Reputation: 3073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkansas Mac View Post
Seems most people like trees until the first major storm causes limb/tree damage

Then they are more careful.
I live in an area with above ground power lines that is largely forested neighborhoods and I still take the trees. The reason being is that sure you may loose power for a bit in a storm and once every ten years you might be out for a week or so, but in summer they are completely necessary. You really cannot comfortably be outside in a place with no shade for any extended period of time at the height North Carolina summer. You will get burned and weak. On the other hand shade makes all the difference. So its worth the trade off.

The same is true for trees and cars. On the one hand if you have parking under trees you risk damage to the car from branches and it is going to get cluttered with leave. With that said again the summer issue applies which is to say that parking under a tree vs in an open lot means your car is much less likely to feel like an equatorial jungle after being parked for several hours.

Aside from that trees may also serve other purposes. Where I used to live willows were planted everywhere. Now you may ask why anyone would be planting willows considering the issues with them, but the land was previously a swamp and the willows were what was controlling most of the street flooding. So it really depends on a lot of issues.

Last edited by Randomstudent; 04-07-2013 at 11:42 PM..
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Old 04-11-2013, 09:59 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14805
Some tree haters on this thread:

How to stop the City from planting a Tree in front of my properties?
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Old 04-11-2013, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,477 posts, read 2,370,744 times
Reputation: 1809
I have to defend the OP here. He/she didn't say that trees are bad, but rather asked if they are always appropriate or desirable. In my area it's common to throw a tree in any open space in the yard without thinking. But there are a number of potential disadvantages to this practice which may apply depending on placement, quantity, or species.

1. Trees can block the viewshed. Important to those of us who have chosen to live in a part of the country with mountain views and open spaces.

2. Evergreen trees in front of the south side of your residence can limit your passive solar potential in the winter (and your natural light all year).

3. Too much shade can adversely impact your ability to grow xeric plants or sun-loving vegetables.

4. Trees that are planted too close to a structure can damage it when the trees grow out.

5. Almost none of the trees planted in the arid and semi-arid West can survive on natural precipitation.

6. Deciduous trees from places with well-defined seasons are frequently damaged by early and late snowfalls in higher elevation temperate zone locations. This damage extends to vehicles and houses that are in the way of the falling limbs. The cleanup required for a larger tree in his sort of situation is substantial.

7. Untrimmed trees in a parkway or right next to the street can interfere with traffic visibility.

8. Autumn leaf cleanup in heavily-treed (with deciduous species) parts of cities is labor intensive and a lot of the leaves end up in the nearby landfill.
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Old 04-12-2013, 07:39 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by xeric View Post
I have to defend the OP here. He/she didn't say that trees are bad, but rather asked if they are always appropriate or desirable. In my area it's common to throw a tree in any open space in the yard without thinking. But there are a number of potential disadvantages to this practice which may apply depending on placement, quantity, or species.

1. Trees can block the viewshed. Important to those of us who have chosen to live in a part of the country with mountain views and open spaces.

We are talking street trees here, in a city. They're not going to interfere with your mountain views. They don't in Denver.

2. Evergreen trees in front of the south side of your residence can limit your passive solar potential in the winter (and your natural light all year).

Again, the thread is not about trees one puts in one's yard. I thought, anyway, this thread was about trees at the edge of the street.

3. Too much shade can adversely impact your ability to grow xeric plants or sun-loving vegetables.

Again, not talking about trees in the yard. Xeriscaping means having different areas of your yard, one for sun-loving, one for shade-loving, etc.

4. Trees that are planted too close to a structure can damage it when the trees grow out.

So follow the recommended planting guidelines..

5. Almost none of the trees planted in the arid and semi-arid West can survive on natural precipitation.

That's not where the OP lives. He lives in Pittsburgh, where trees literally take over if they're not cut down. Once established, trees in metro Denver do not need a lot of extra watering.

6. Deciduous trees from places with well-defined seasons are frequently damaged by early and late snowfalls in higher elevation temperate zone locations. This damage extends to vehicles and houses that are in the way of the falling limbs. The cleanup required for a larger tree in his sort of situation is substantial.

So put your car in the garage. I thought we weren't supposed to drive cars, anyway? (For you super-serious minded posters, that is a joke.) Don't plant right next to your house.

7. Untrimmed trees in a parkway or right next to the street can interfere with traffic visibility.

City code usually requires the trees be trimmed to not interfere with walking. Again, you're not supposed to be driving in the first place, and I honestly don't see how such trees, even untrimmed, can interfere with one's vision on the street.

8. Autumn leaf cleanup in heavily-treed (with deciduous species) parts of cities is labor intensive and a lot of the leaves end up in the nearby landfill.
He doesn't like to mow lawns, either. My city has a leaf-compost program, where you take the leaves to a collection spot. We put ours on our garden. The leaves bio-degrade. They're not even *that* bad in a landfill.

Mine in teal.

Last edited by nei; 04-12-2013 at 09:07 AM.. Reason: rude
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:06 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
He doesn't like to mow lawns, either.
What's wrong with that? I don't see the point myself. Regardless, I assume xeric isn't a lawn fan either so I'm not sure what the point of that statement was.

Quote:
So put your car in the garage.
What garage can I put my car in? You're assuming people have garages.

Last edited by nei; 04-12-2013 at 09:16 AM..
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:14 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,104,114 times
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There aren't many garages in my neighborhood. My neighbors on either side are serious car guys - one for sports cars, other for trucks - and have always coped with the debris by using car covers. I think with or without the trees they'd still spend their weekends washing and polishing their "babies." But I know for certain they love the trees in our neighborhood, especially this time of year. A few cherries, forsythia, and weeping willows.

Sometimes trees that were planted years ago along the sidewalk start to break up the walkway. I'm a firm believer in ADA compliance so replacing these trees with something more appropriate - I'm fine with that.

I hate mowing the lawn. It takes all of 20 minutes but I'm waiting for some enterprising kid to offer to do it for me for $20. They are missing out.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:23 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,850 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
He doesn't like to mow lawns, either. My city has a leaf-compost program, where you take the leaves to a collection spot. We put ours on our garden. The leaves bio-degrade. They're not even *that* bad in a landfill.

Mine in teal.

Street trees can block views, can shade solar potential and can shade yards limiting gardens.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:30 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Street trees can block views, can shade solar potential and can shade yards limiting gardens.
An old rental I had, the landlord planted a tree. Too small to make a difference at the time, but my south-facing bedroom faced the street with a small setback (10 feet? possibly less). I wouldn't want a tree there, it block the sun that poured int my room. It would also keep it cooler, but I didn't really mind it being warmer and in the spring, the natural heating was welcome.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,378 posts, read 59,846,787 times
Reputation: 54025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Street trees can block views, can shade solar potential and can shade yards limiting gardens.
Again the topic is street trees. Anyone who values seeing their neighbor's house across the street more than seeing trees ... well, there are some serious psychological problems there.

"Solar potential" is a moot point in the winter, and because most trees planted along the curb these days grow barely taller than the houses -- and the trees provide valuable shade in the summer -- and gardens are limited only by your imagination.
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