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Old 04-25-2013, 11:08 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
$17,165 for the one I went to. New York City is $19,000. As an aside, rural areas aren't mentioned much, but the school district my aunt lives in in upstate NY (rather rural) scores quite a bit worse than NYC for 4th grade reading and math scores. There's something funny with this map:

New York City Public Schools

Zoom out. Why does Conneticut and Pennsyvlannia score so much higher than neighboring states? Different state tests?
Different tests is one explanation. I've "heard" the Texas test is not as difficult as the Colorado test, for ex. (Don't know if it's true, just sayin'.)

The other explanation is that those of us from PA are just so smart!
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Old 04-25-2013, 11:12 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,883,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I certainly will accept your personal experiences. One has to wonder just what is going on in the Philadelphia schools though. According to this source, the per-pupil expenditure in the Phila. schools is $10,584. It is $6800 in Denver.

Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed
Find your district’s 2012-13 funding numbers | EdNewsColorado

Beginning teacher salary in Philly is $41,111, top is $75,572.
Beginning teacher salary in DPS is $37,927, top is $74,960.

http://static.dpsk12.org/gems/hr2009/20122013Salary.pdf
http://www.nctq.org/docs/7-08.pdf

These salaries are fairly comparable.
Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation

So what's going on in Philly? Too many highly paid administrators? I've always wondered why schools need so many administrators, especially when there is so much professional staff. It seems schools have way more admins than say, a hospital, which has a lot of unskilled laborers.
Like I said before, high spending does not always correlate with high quality. The Philadelphia School District is riddled with bureaucracy. It's not so much that the administrators are paid highly (which they aren't for the most part) so much as that a) there's a ton of them and b) their somewhat lower full-time salaries are later compensated by generous pensions ($75k goes much further in Denver than it does in Philly). When you have a school district as large and troubled as Philadelphia, you're going to have a lot of redundant school facilities, which come along with redundant teachers, staff, administrators, etc. A lot of problems here come from the teacher's unions as well (they exist for a good reason, and I would never advocate busting them apart, but they certainly contribute more than their fair share to the red tape).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Different tests is one explanation. I've "heard" the Texas test is not as difficult as the Colorado test, for ex. (Don't know if it's true, just sayin'.)

The other explanation is that those of us from PA are just so smart!
Pennsylvania tends to be, aggregately, an upper-middle public school performer because the good-to-excellent suburban districts largely (though not entirely) outweigh the lackluster urban/rural ones.

Last edited by Yac; 05-21-2013 at 06:59 AM..
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Old 04-25-2013, 11:31 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
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I thnik we see even i mosy urban schools kids that come out with a good eduatio to move forward. often the difference is how they actaully value learning and education. urban schools ahve alot of mney thrown at them with such a school feedigspeical programs for under advataged kids etc;but pernats and studnet valuing education can makde a huge difference. I think we see that with asians kids who often go to same schools with entirely different outcomes so often. Throwig money isn't goig to solved a problem of student and aprents valign education which is often so lacking i urban schools. Mnay become social gathering places instead of learn institutions and much energy and fundig is wasted governing behaviour because of it.
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Old 04-25-2013, 11:37 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,883,454 times
Reputation: 4691
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I thnik we see even i mosy urban schools kids that come out with a good eduatio to move forward. often the difference is how they actaully value learning and education. urban schools ahve alot of mney thrown at them with such a school feedigspeical programs for under advataged kids etc;but pernats and studnet valuing education can makde a huge difference. I think we see that with asians kids who often go to same schools with entirely different outcomes so often. Throwig money isn't goig to solved a problem of student and aprents valign education which is often so lacking i urban schools. Mnay become social gathering places instead of learn institutions and much energy and fundig is wasted governing behaviour because of it.
I agree that money isn't a one-all solution to the problem, but proper allocation/spending of resources is a key issue that cannot be ignored.
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Old 12-19-2013, 01:51 PM
 
6,066 posts, read 10,848,039 times
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There is education outside of schools and where students younger than young adults go to school. I expected another main focus on this topic such as a correlation between multidimensional education compared to a fair, proper investment and equal distribution of wealth into all urban planning projects.

I feel there is too much bureaucracy systems and some flaws with investment preventing more development, and progress from happening in architecture urban planning projects, and too much reliance on monopolized capitalistic wealth, and a comprehensive political/government system.

There is an internal mechanism necessary to change in how investment collaterally affects and makes practical actions happen in architecture, urban planning projects.
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