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Old 04-11-2013, 09:27 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,299,119 times
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What works? What doesn't work? Trying to think of some ideas for my own neighborhood's needs in advance of a planning meeting. Mini roundabouts (or rotaries, in New England parlance) are popping up elsewhere in the city. They seem to be effective, to me.



Speed bumps appear to be out of favor as an effective tool, but I think our city still installs them. I'm not as up to date on other measures as we're a bit behind the state of the art in Baltimore, I think.

I'm aware there are lots of studies, but interested in also hearing anecdotally what people like and don't.
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Old 04-11-2013, 11:09 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,810,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
What works? What doesn't work? Trying to think of some ideas for my own neighborhood's needs in advance of a planning meeting. Mini roundabouts (or rotaries, in New England parlance) are popping up elsewhere in the city. They seem to be effective, to me.



Speed bumps appear to be out of favor as an effective tool, but I think our city still installs them. I'm not as up to date on other measures as we're a bit behind the state of the art in Baltimore, I think.

I'm aware there are lots of studies, but interested in also hearing anecdotally what people like and don't.
In order of preference:

1. Buildings close to street with entrances facing street that tell drivers "hey, people live and walk here".
2. Two way traffic w/curb parking and yield streets
3. Bulb outs
4. Treed streets
5. Traffic circles and other traffic medians that forces people to slow down
6. Frequent stop signs only if road badly designed in first place.

I do not like and think road humps are almost always unnecessary...exception being a busy intersection with a lot of children crossing such as a museum or school.

Last edited by Komeht; 04-11-2013 at 12:31 PM..
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Old 04-11-2013, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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I think on-street parking has a traffic calming effect. I tend to drive slower when there's a risk of sideswiping a car.

I also think the addition of a bike lane in between the curb and parked cars is a good way to shrink a street, make it more pedestrian friendly, and also give some priority to an alternative mode of transportation. This works well, imo, on streets with street parking that still feel too wide. This may not be practical in all cases, but it's something I think works well to slow down traffic.

Washington, DC - Google Maps
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Old 04-11-2013, 11:52 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I think on-street parking has a traffic calming effect. I tend to drive slower when there's a risk of sideswiping a car.

I also think the addition of a bike lane in between the curb and parked cars is a good way to shrink a street, make it more pedestrian friendly, and also give some priority to an alternative mode of transportation. This works well, imo, on streets with street parking that still feel too wide. This may not be practical in all cases, but it's something I think works well to slow down traffic.

Washington, DC - Google Maps

I think the 15th street cycle track is a great idea - traffic calming, a protected cycle track (which will encouraging biking by the hesitant more than a conventional bike lane) plus providing parking to those who do need to use their autos. Win - win.
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:06 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,055,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
In order of preference:

1. Buildings close to street with entrances facing street that tell drivers "hey, people live and walk here".
2. Two way traffic w/curb parking and yield streets
In neighborhoods, this has a finite effect. When too few cars are present, it is my experience that people just drive down the middle of the street.

What I haven't seen create "calm" traffic are stop signs, speed bumps, unattended radar signs, excessively punitive citations.
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:19 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,810,132 times
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Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
In neighborhoods, this has a finite effect. When too few cars are present, it is my experience that people just drive down the middle of the street.

What I haven't seen create "calm" traffic are stop signs, speed bumps, unattended radar signs, excessively punitive citations.
This is the way traffic was effectively calmed for generations...before the traffic engineers ruined our cities. In inner city neighborhoods all over the US it works every single day to calm traffic and despite traffic engineer claims that these streets kill people, they don't. It's the fast traffic streets with wide lanes and unobstructed roads that kill people.
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:27 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,055,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
This is the way traffic was effectively calmed for generations...before the traffic engineers ruined our cities. In inner city neighborhoods all over the US it works every single day to calm traffic and despite traffic engineer claims that these streets kill people, they don't. It's the fast traffic streets with wide lanes and unobstructed roads that kill people.
Clearly, your experience has been different than mine. Too often, I've seen people race between bumps and stops, stops become yields, and people drive dangerously fast down streets with long sightlines, despite being crammed with parked cars. These "effective" solutions have been anything but.
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:59 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,875 posts, read 10,948,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
In neighborhoods, this has a finite effect. When too few cars are present, it is my experience that people just drive down the middle of the street.

What I haven't seen create "calm" traffic are stop signs, speed bumps, unattended radar signs, excessively punitive citations.

stop signs are an intersection treatment, not necessarily a traffic calming measure. high fines for citations are a means of enforcement (and theres evidence they can have some effect, IIUC) but traffic calming IIUC are measures to make people speed less apart from enforcement. Im not sure about speed bumps - I think in some instances they can work - but I suppose many people speed up, then slow down at the bump. I wouldnt enjoy driving like that.
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:07 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,299,119 times
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Speed bumps are also incredibly unpopular. We have one street with them, and while those who live on it enjoy slower traffic flow, but they also really dislike driving over those things every day. Speed tables might be the evolution of design.

Speed bumps can work on budget "bike boulevards" though with cutouts for bikes

I'd like a lot of the four way intersections here adopt mini roundabouts. Cause mfers cruise through all the time.
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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A lot of people don't even slow down for speed bumps. I have witnessed a few accidents where someone ran over a speed bump too fast, lost control, and then crashed into parked cars. Apparently hitting a speed bump with too much speed can be fatal in some cases.

Driver dies after hitting speed bump, utility pole | khou.com Houston
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