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Old 06-03-2013, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,067,444 times
Reputation: 3600

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Not sure if this is the right thread for the question, but can someone update me on what has been happending in Detroit for the last five to ten years with regard to abandoned housing? Does the city raze a certain number of those every year? if so, has much progress been made in terms of the numbers of abondoned buildings, residential or otherwise, still standing and just decaying?
Detroit, as of 2012, has 350,000+/- residential homes and somewhere around 20% of them are vacant. So that's something like 40,000 vacant homes and Detroit only demolishes about 3,000 a year. It's awfully slow because of red tape. The city has to go through the process of demolishing homes based on when they become vacant and, obviously, not every home on a block goes vacant at the same time. Plus, it uses taxpayer money and since Detroit has a shrinking tax base and growing debt, the process has slowed down a bit, especially post-recession.

However, just this year, the city partnered up with William Pulte (grandson of the founder of Pulte Homes, the largest home-building company in the country...oh the irony) to create a Blight Authority to bypass red tape and demolish whole blocks at a time. So far they've just done a few blocks outside of downtown.

Detroit Blight Authority Secretly Eyes Next Demo Target - Blight Fight - Curbed Detroit

Detroit Blight Authority

Quote:
Are there large areas where the buildings have been razed and just the lots remain?
There's quite a few. This is by far the largest continuous blocks of vacant land in the city and has already started to return to nature.

https://www.google.com/maps?q=42.393...num=1&t=k&z=18

Some other notable areas with large swaths of empty lots.

https://www.google.com/maps?q=42.421...num=1&t=k&z=17

https://www.google.com/maps?q=42.411...num=1&t=k&z=17

https://www.google.com/maps?q=42.376...num=1&t=k&z=16

https://www.google.com/maps?q=42.422...num=1&t=k&z=16
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Old 06-03-2013, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,833,618 times
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Thank you very much, Animatedmartian, for providing that information. It staggers the imagination in a way. Any city demolishing 3,000 vacant houses per year sounds like a whole lot (a big number), but in proportion to the entirety of the problem it's very little. 40,000 vacant homes! And that's after quite a few have been demolished over the past few years.

I was curious about the present situation because after reading about it several years ago, I just hadn't heard anything more.
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Old 06-03-2013, 10:38 PM
 
Location: NJ
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There is no hope for Detroit. Its time has passed to correct the errors of its ways.
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Old 06-04-2013, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,067,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Thank you very much, Animatedmartian, for providing that information. It staggers the imagination in a way. Any city demolishing 3,000 vacant houses per year sounds like a whole lot (a big number), but in proportion to the entirety of the problem it's very little. 40,000 vacant homes! And that's after quite a few have been demolished over the past few years.

I was curious about the present situation because after reading about it several years ago, I just hadn't heard anything more.
*I forgot to mention that it's housing units, not necessarily single houses. The count includes multifamily apartments and flats. Nonetheless, it's still a lot of vacancies.

A local planning agency has the residential permit counts for all of SE Michigan since 1969. Detroit's been demolishing units non-stop since then and very few years come close to adding more units than demolishing them. Of course, knowing that the city has been in constant population decline, it's what you'd expect.


SEMCOG Data and Maps - Residential Building Permits
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Old 06-09-2013, 06:24 AM
 
2,583 posts, read 2,951,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The "revitalization of Detroit" almost certainly will involve a further population decline, at least initially. This is because if you're talking about replacing black families with white yuppies you're replacing households with 2-4 people with 1-2 people. So even with a flat number of households, and keeping an identical number of housing units on the market, there should still be a considerable further drop. I wouldn't be surprised if the population falls well below 500,000 before it begins to stabilize, even in a best-case scenario.
Unfortunately, I believe this is probably one of the more likely answers for improving Detroit long term. To continue to decrease its population in the city is probably the only answer as it will cost less to maintain. Many derelict abandoned residential homes will continue to be demolished year after year leaving behind more open spaces in the city. Detroit will better function as a smaller-tiered city in time as it continues to lose its population. I actually believe Detroit city will turn itself around and somehow improve, but it is going to take a long time to recover, decades out for sure.

If Detroit could attract another industry to employee its citizens that will certainly help but for the short-term, I don't see that really happening yet. Maybe in time. The NYT article is a good find. I really hope some of these people who come in to invest in Detroit can somehow improve it, but right now it looks like staggering odds to me.
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