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Old 04-14-2013, 09:18 PM
 
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http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/14/bu...s&emc=rss&_r=0

I've largely regarded Detroit as a lost cause due to combination of loss of industry and complete public mismanagement...the situation is so grim in that city it is hard to see how it can recover in our lifetimes.

I've often wondered if one very committed man with a vision and enough resources to back it could literally transform a city. Dan Gilbert seems to have both and (for now) a City government willing to backstop his efforts. It will be interesting to see how this plays out over next 10-20 years. I agree that the real struggle may not be with downtown as much as the surrounding city neighborhoods. But a single spark can start a small ember which can grow to a large fire given the right conditions.

Also Richard Rainwater made a mint betting on Houston when it was seemingly in decline (though of course, nothing on par with Detroit).

Last edited by Komeht; 04-14-2013 at 09:30 PM..
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Old 04-14-2013, 09:26 PM
 
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Frankly I hope he succeeds. The biggest obstacles will be political.
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Old 04-14-2013, 09:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
Frankly I hope he succeeds. The biggest obstacles will be political.
Of course it would be wonderful to see it recover. The city has fantastic architecture and was once one of the great cities in the US. The challenges will be on all fronts.
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Old 04-14-2013, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
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He will see success, I've been out around Wayne State and Midtown. It's not vibrant on the outside but you sometimes walk into a place and wonder where did all these people come from. For as many young people that leave to places like Chi, NYC, SF, etc... there are those here who feel some kind of loyalty to be in the home-state and try to do things in Detroit.

It will be a growing process but there is no way in my eyes things get worse or stay the same.
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Old 04-14-2013, 11:09 PM
 
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Default I dunno ...

...the article give the distinct impression that trouble is already brewing politically with people in the "have not" sections of Detroit already having been involved in protest. Further the academics with many years of solid urban planning expertise (and it sound like at least one has eight generations of familial ties to Detroit...) strongly suggest that the massive depopulation is already too far gone to turn things around with innumerable thousands of burned out homes and too few employers to sustain the massive debt of past corrupt politics there is bankruptcy expert in charge of Detroit...



Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
He will see success, I've been out around Wayne State and Midtown. It's not vibrant on the outside but you sometimes walk into a place and wonder where did all these people come from. For as many young people that leave to places like Chi, NYC, SF, etc... there are those here who feel some kind of loyalty to be in the home-state and try to do things in Detroit.

It will be a growing process but there is no way in my eyes things get worse or stay the same.
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Old 04-14-2013, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
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Maybe turn around isn't the right terminology per say. Detroit will never have the population of 1.9 million again, what you will see is downtown revitalized and then things will sprinkle out bit by bit. In the future I see a city of 700k like now except a demographic change. Many of those abandoned homes more distant from the core will need to come down. The city needs to be condensed.
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Old 04-14-2013, 11:40 PM
 
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Default Hmm...

Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
Maybe turn around isn't the right terminology per say. Detroit will never have the population of 1.9 million again, what you will see is downtown revitalized and then things will sprinkle out bit by bit. In the future I see a city of 700k like now except a demographic change. Many of those abandoned homes more distant from the core will need to come down. The city needs to be condensed.
I wonder the "condensing" will result in a "sweetened" Detroit or perhaps just an "evaporated" one -- Condensed Milk vs. Evaporated Milk - Slashfood
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Old 04-15-2013, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
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^^I've seen pics of old Detroit, it won't be back to that... I couldn't imagine things getting worse than now, or a less vibrant city than what it is. Largely this will be based upon the mindset of people in the state, a lot of people here want nothing to do with the city or just think of a city as a place to check out a ballgame and drive back home to suburbs.

I've just came off of visits from NYC and Chi, I plan on living in one of those cities this year... I told my parents this they think cities aren't places to "live." Maybe that mindset will never change here and things won't change, but as more youth come along, I don't see the status quo flying. Too many people expect us to go to college, graduate and settle down immediately move to suburb x, none of my friends even the older ones are at that point and my friends sister who is married lives in Boston with kids.

Basically, I just don't see the cycle repeating, and Detroit being bad now, say in 20 years things have improved... well it will be cheaper for a family to live there instead of NYC or LA for those who aren't rich or want to stay near family.
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Old 04-15-2013, 05:45 AM
 
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Quote:
what you will see is downtown revitalized and then things will sprinkle out bit by bit.
Yeah; there's an enormous gap between rehabbing part of downtown/Cass Corridor/Midtown and trying to "fix" the entire city. The city as a whole can still continue to decline even as parts of the city become stronger and more cohesive. Downtown Detroit has taken some hits over the years, but it has always been better-off and had better services and more activity than the parts of the city that really declined.

I think the general "plan" in place for years has been to stabilize/increase the population of a few high-priority areas: Downtown up north to Wayne State/Midtown, Corktown (to the immediate west of downtown), the waterfront extending northeast of downtown past Belle Isle/along Jefferson Ave. (and a few adjoining areas like Indian Village and East English Village), portions of "Mexicantown" (to the southwest of downtown), the area around Eastern Market to the east of the Woodward corridor, the area around Palmer Park, the areas around UD-Mercy and Marygrove (the University District, in the city's northwest), the Grosse Pointe area (northeast of downtown), and the Boston-Edison area (north of Midtown). Parts of the independent city of Hamtramck - a Detroit enclave northeast of downtown - are also doing acceptably.

That leaves out most of the city, but, if you don't start somewhere, you'll get nowhere at all...
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Old 04-15-2013, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,460 posts, read 11,967,021 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
Maybe turn around isn't the right terminology per say. Detroit will never have the population of 1.9 million again, what you will see is downtown revitalized and then things will sprinkle out bit by bit. In the future I see a city of 700k like now except a demographic change. Many of those abandoned homes more distant from the core will need to come down. The city needs to be condensed.
The "revitalization of Detroit" almost certainly will involve a further population decline, at least initially. This is because if you're talking about replacing black families with white yuppies you're replacing households with 2-4 people with 1-2 people. So even with a flat number of households, and keeping an identical number of housing units on the market, there should still be a considerable further drop. I wouldn't be surprised if the population falls well below 500,000 before it begins to stabilize, even in a best-case scenario.
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