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Old 04-06-2014, 12:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
And I completely disagreed with your theory. I don't think Hispanic day laborers are too tired to engage in recreational biking when they get off work.
Not sure why you turned this into a racial thing. My point was people that do hard physical labor all day are less likely to be into recreational biking than someone that sits at a desk all day.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Not sure why you turned this into a racial thing.
What does that even mean? If I point out that there are cultural differences between the Black majority/plurality in DC and the White minority, and that those differences may possibly account for the large racial gap in bikeshare subscriptions, that then means I'm making it a "racial thing?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
My point was people that do hard physical labor all day are less likely to be into recreational biking than someone that sits at a desk all day.
That point was noted. My point was that the same people doing hard physical labor (and in DC and in many other cities Hispanics are doing the majority of that type of labor) are also exercising. So I don't see fatigue as being a reason why they're not riding. There are also a lot of wealthy, black professionals in DC who obviously have not taken to Bikeshare. They're not riding and joining because they're fatigued. And poverty clearly isn't the reason why they're not riding.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Not sure why you turned this into a racial thing. My point was people that do hard physical labor all day are less likely to be into recreational biking than someone that sits at a desk all day.
I think there is zero correlation between those things. Or you re making the wrong correlation. Recreational biking is more popular with white class workers, most likely. But it is more class than anything else. Other sports are more popular with other groups.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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You see this all over the park in Flushing Meadows. Some of these guys may have comfy white collar jobs in Midtown, but I doubt it. If they have the energy (and the time) to play two hour soccer matches, then I don't see why they wouldn't be able to ride a bike for a few miles.


Soccer in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park - YouTube
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,352 posts, read 26,378,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I think there is zero correlation between those things. Or you re making the wrong correlation. Recreational biking is more popular with white class workers, most likely. But it is more class than anything else. Other sports are more popular with other groups.
In DC, there is definitely some correlation. DC has the most educated and affluent African American population in the United States. Based on their numbers, they should make up WAY more than 3% of CaBi's ridership. So it's not just class because these same people have money to spend on trips to Brazil and Audis and what not. They're just not spending money (or time) on cycling.

BTW, I just found this from a blogger here in NYC.

Quote:
I was discussing my plans to upgrade my current bicycle with a couple of friends when one of them said he wishes he could ride a bike but can’t. I thought maybe he had never learned, or had some physical limitations, but his answer was “If anyone from the hood saw me on a bicycle, they’d think I fell off.”
http://blackgirlfit.com/2011/06/16/b...nt-ride-bikes/

That's true for some people. I think the bigger reason, however, is that there's not as much European admiration/adulation/emulation.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 04-06-2014 at 01:30 PM..
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
In DC, there is definitely some correlation. DC has the most educated and affluent African American population in the United States. Based on their numbers, they should make up WAY more than 3% of CaBi's ridership. So it's not just class because these same people have money to spend on trips to Brazil and Audis and what not. They're just not spending money (or time) on cycling.
Oh I met recreational cycling, I think it is more of a white upper class pasttime. Not bike share. (Which isn't for recreation). The bike share problem is totally different. I think infrastructure plays a role too. To stereotype, I am going to say black riders are way more cautious than their white peers and aren't going to be riding I the shoulder next to speeding cars. But if it is a pleasant safe feeling ride, people will do it. If the bike lanes aren't in black neighborhoods, no one is going. (And DC is segregated by race and class. Affluent black people tend to live I black neighborhoods there). My guess is it is the the bike lanes.

*recreational cyclists tend to put their bikes in their car! drive to a bike path and then ride. It is a different scene.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,352 posts, read 26,378,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Oh I met recreational cycling, I think it is more of a white upper class past time. Not bike share. (Which isn't for recreation). The bike share problem is totally different. I think infrastructure plays a role too. To stereotype, I am going to say black riders are way more cautious than their white peers and aren't going to be riding I the shoulder next to speeding cars. But if it is a pleasant safe feeling ride, people will do it. If the bike lanes aren't in black neighborhoods, no one is going. (And DC is segregated by race and class. Affluent black people tend to live I black neighborhoods there). My guess is it is the the bike lanes.
Nope. They live in many of the same places that are now rapidly gentrifying...around Howard University, U Street, Petworth. There are plenty of bikeshares in those neighborhoods as well as plenty of bikeshares in the poorer neighborhoods east of the Anacostia.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,796,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
BTW, I just found this from a blogger here in NYC.



BLACK PEOPLE DON’T RIDE BIKES? : blackgirlfit

That's true for some people. I think the bigger reason, however, is that there's not as much European admiration/adulation/emulation.
I definitely think it is true about the whole "biking is for poor people" plays a part. But I also think it is marketing. Check out this article about the south side of Chicago.
http://bikeportland.org/2014/02/06/c...ropolis-101014

Basically Chicago hired consultants from Portland to increase biking in the south side. They came in talking about health and how biking helps with diabetes and obesity. Nobody cared. They did car about air quality and asthma, and the message stuck.

Detroit has an increase in biking too. And it isn't just the white hipsters.....they found that community bases messaging, where you forge connections with your neighbors and you go on tours of local businesses did the trick.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,796,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Nope. They live in many of the same places that are now rapidly gentrifying...around Howard University, U Street, Petworth. There are plenty of bikeshares in those neighborhoods as well as plenty of bikeshares in the poorer neighborhoods east of the Anacostia.
The Anacostia stations are new right? Bike share's problem in DC is definitely a marketing problem. Like all other bike marketing. People haven't spent time on focus groups and the right messaging. It isn't the same for each group.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,796,901 times
Reputation: 26687
DC also has this group too:
Black Women Bike: DC
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