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Old 04-13-2014, 02:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Among my own circle, I get the sense that people are not averse to the idea, but don't really find it that appealing.

I think it's a very particular demographic that's into bikeshare. If you put a whole bunch of stations in white, working-class Northeast Philadelphia, I don't think ridership would be anything close to what it would be in Yuppier Manayunk.
I find the idea of bike share odd. If you truly need the bike for commuting reasons you would own one(they are not that expensive and if you need it to get to work or school, you need it! You can't risk the bike not being there.) and the fees seem a bit high for someone who is low income.

Here it is $75 a year for an annual membership which is kinda high for someone who is low income. This however is only for 30 mins of use and if you exceed 30 mins. late fees kick in. You could pay $7.00 for an 24 hour pass, but again late fees kick in if you don't return the bike to an station in 30 mins.

Neither of these options make sense if you are low income. CTA fare with transfer is at most $2.50. Granted the fare only covers two hours of CTA use(and 3 rides total) but that would be enough to take you across the whole city and even out to the burbs. You could even work an round trip into that fair if the trip were short enough. If you need two then the total would be $5.00. still cheaper than the bike share and a lot less limited. Not to mention CTA passes, which are more expensive than the bike either yearly or per use, but if you need to use the bus or train anyway for other reasons(like round trips to work) they are unlimited ride. Heck $10 you could get an one day pass and still be ahead if you need the bike for an hour.



I think it is just a way for those who have the cash, to avoid the slow and icky bus or to look cool and hip. Bike riding can be faster than the bus on an short trip but that is about it.

Last edited by chirack; 04-13-2014 at 03:05 PM..
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Old 04-13-2014, 03:05 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,247,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
I think it is just a way for those who have the cash, to avoid the slow and icky bus or to look cool and hip. Bike riding can be faster than the bus on an short trip but that is about it.
That's the point, a short trip on a bus can be rather clumsy without a direct route. Even for many longer trips, biking wins out if there's not a direct bus route (or your starting point and destination is a long walk away from a bus stop) $75 / year is still a small fraction of the cost of annual transit pass. The advantage of using a bike share over owning a bicycle:

1) You don't have to worry about parking or theft, as long as there's a bike station nearby.
2) You can combine it with transit: take transit, then use bike share. Sure, sometimes you can put your bicycle on transit, but a rental could be easier.
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Old 04-13-2014, 03:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's the point, a short trip on a bus can be rather clumsy without a direct route. Even for many longer trips, biking wins out if there's not a direct bus route (or your starting point and destination is a long walk away from a bus stop) $75 / year is still a small fraction of the cost of annual transit pass. The advantage of using a bike share over owning a bicycle:

1) You don't have to worry about parking or theft, as long as there's a bike station nearby.
2) You can combine it with transit: take transit, then use bike share. Sure, sometimes you can put your bicycle on transit, but a rental could be easier.
1. Not the way Divvy is set up. You can only ride the bike for 30 mins to the next station. If not at an station then late fees kick in. If you need to park your bike there are bike racks or you could secure it to an city light post or other item. Some EL stations have bike racks. The late fees are $2.00 for 30-60 mins late, $6.00 for 60-90 mins. late and $8.00 for each additional 30 mins after 90 that the bike is late.

2. Maybe I am spoiled but odds are there is an bus line within walking distance of where you are going unless your are riding on weekends or late night. The problem is you need the bike to be available, and with an bike share that is not always possible. Also the bike share tends to be in better off areas well served by transit, not areas lacking it.

Also if you have paid for an CTA pass why would you spend MORE money on the bike share? Is it because you have more income to blow on said bike share to skip the bus perhaps? The passes may be expensive,but they are unlimited.

If you don't have the money for the pass then the fare is cheaper than the bike share at the daily rate. The only advantage would be if you only needed the bike and only for 30 mins and were unwilling to buy an used bike then you could come out ahead with a yearly pass but it would be smarter just to buy a bike of your own in this instance as you wouldn't be limited to just parking the thing at the station.

Last edited by chirack; 04-13-2014 at 03:51 PM..
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Old 04-13-2014, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
I find the idea of bike share odd. If you truly need the bike for commuting reasons you would own one(they are not that expensive and if you need it to get to work or school, you need it! You can't risk the bike not being there.) and the fees seem a bit high for someone who is low income.
I agree with you, it is an odd thing, though I see people all over Manhattan and Brooklyn using them. Not sure how many people use them regularly for commuting purposes compared to people who are tourists using them, but they do get used a lot.

Basically there is an obvious market for them, so why not make money on bike sharing, especially if a city already has a bicycle infrastructure and wants to put even more bikes on the streets.

As for the low income part, I don't think they were ever designed for the low income crowd, but then again I don't recall any bike share being market to low income people.
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Old 04-13-2014, 04:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I agree with you, it is an odd thing, though I see people all over Manhattan and Brooklyn using them. Not sure how many people use them regularly for commuting purposes compared to people who are tourists using them, but they do get used a lot.

Basically there is an obvious market for them, so why not make money on bike sharing, especially if a city already has a bicycle infrastructure and wants to put even more bikes on the streets.

As for the low income part, I don't think they were ever designed for the low income crowd, but then again I don't recall any bike share being market to low income people.
My view on them is they tend to be young, yuppies not tourist here. There were bike rentals before, but people tended to ride those by the lake.
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Old 04-13-2014, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
My view on them is they tend to be young, yuppies not tourist here. There were bike rentals before, but people tended to ride those by the lake.
That's cool, there is obviously a market for them. In NYC it seems to be a combination of yuppies and tourists.
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Old 04-13-2014, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Citi Bike is, rather ironically, currently in need of bailout moneys. Unlike its corporate namesake, however, that doesn't seem to be in the cards. Other systems like Velib in Paris are subsidized. All rely on advertising as a significant source of revenue as well which is a somewhat risky stream since urban outdoor advertising is a relatively new thing.
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Old 04-13-2014, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
As for the low income part, I don't think they were ever designed for the low income crowd, but then again I don't recall any bike share being market to low income people.
Advertising usually isn't targeted at the low-income, ever. The exception being PSAs, if that's even considering advertising. Bike sharing is dependent on advertising, so it's not exactly the image they're going for. While it's true that everyone is going to see those ads, by far the most affected group is going to be bikeshare users themselves. People in public housing do get reduced rates as, of course, do Citi bank cardholders as Citi's sponsorship is primarily to sell banking services.
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Old 04-13-2014, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
I find the idea of bike share odd. If you truly need the bike for commuting reasons you would own one(they are not that expensive and if you need it to get to work or school, you need it! You can't risk the bike not being there.) and the fees seem a bit high for someone who is low income.

Here it is $75 a year for an annual membership which is kinda high for someone who is low income. This however is only for 30 mins of use and if you exceed 30 mins. late fees kick in. You could pay $7.00 for an 24 hour pass, but again late fees kick in if you don't return the bike to an station in 30 mins.

I think it is just a way for those who have the cash, to avoid the slow and icky bus or to look cool and hip. Bike riding can be faster than the bus on an short trip but that is about it.
Ours is priced about the same and a in a poorly planned pilot. But the commuter train, Caltrain, has a limited number of spots for bikes, and it runs infrequently. So if you bring your bike, and the bike car is full, you get bumped to the next train which might come in 40-60 minutes. Many people bring their bikes because there are no buses or infrequent ones on the other side.

Bike share is doing best in SF. I was there today and saw a mixed age range of people using the bikes. Mostly people over 40. I don't think we have much tourist usage. In our case, SF muni is slow or crowded, so a bike might be a better option.
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Old 04-13-2014, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Ours is priced about the same and a in a poorly planned pilot. But the commuter train, Caltrain, has a limited number of spots for bikes, and it runs infrequently. So if you bring your bike, and the bike car is full, you get bumped to the next train which might come in 40-60 minutes. Many people bring their bikes because there are no buses or infrequent ones on the other side.

Bike share is doing best in SF. I was there today and saw a mixed age range of people using the bikes. Mostly people over 40. I don't think we have much tourist usage. In our case, SF muni is slow or crowded, so a bike might be a better option.
That's not really the intention. First of all, it's pretty stupid to have a bike share and not just pick up the bike where you need it but rather than take it on the train. In terms of pricing, trying to get your bike share bicycle onto the train is going to be expensive since it's $4 for the first 30 minutes and $7/30 mins afterwards. You're just not going to be able to pick up your bike from wherever you wanted it, ride it to the station, get on a train, get off the train, ride to the nearest docking station and return the bike without hitting overtime fees.

Stations are just too limited outside of the small part of San Francisco covered to be of much use. While it sounds nice to use them for the last mile problems in Peninsula/South Bay, what exactly are you supposed to do with it? Generally there's only a station or two clustered around Caltrain. Take Redwood City, which has more availability than most. There's nothing outside of pretty easy walking range. Presumably you're using the bike because it's too far to walk. Not much use since you can't go beyond walking distance without paying $7/hour to park the bicycle wherever you were going.
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