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Old 04-18-2013, 07:58 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sponger42 View Post
Boston's light rail (not subway) allows bicycles anytime that is not considered peak hours. Peak hours are inbound to the city from 6AM to 9AM and outbound 4PM to 7PM. I rode outbound around 7:30, so I could bring my bike onboard.
okay, so that means they have to enforce on the train. they can't enforce at the station (or that the station entry gates), because you could claim to be going reverse. Seems like a greater enforcement burden for the transit authority. Which is why I think they don't do it that way in DC.
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Old 04-18-2013, 05:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
1. in general thats not the goal of traffic calming. Its not even to reduce the average speed of traffic. Its to reduce the extreme of speeding.
Read kiddos post. Anyway, often enough "traffic calming" is implemented with speed bumps ("humps", whatever) with a suggested speed below the speed limit, or other obnoxious measures like mid-block stop signs or sections which are too narrow for one car to pass. The "calming" and "reduce extreme speeding" is just the sales pitch.

And if you're "calming" arterials you're certainly doing it wrong.
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Old 04-18-2013, 08:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Read kiddos post. Anyway, often enough "traffic calming" is implemented with speed bumps ("humps", whatever) with a suggested speed below the speed limit, or other obnoxious measures like mid-block stop signs or sections which are too narrow for one car to pass. The "calming" and "reduce extreme speeding" is just the sales pitch.

And if you're "calming" arterials you're certainly doing it wrong.

No one is advocating for putting speed bumps everywhere on busy streets or for placing stop signs in the middle of a busy thoroughfare or other such nonsense. That's not what traffic calming is about. These straw man arguments are absolutely ridiculous and just plain nonsense.
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Old 04-18-2013, 08:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
No one is advocating for putting speed bumps everywhere on busy streets or for placing stop signs in the middle of a busy thoroughfare or other such nonsense.
Really? So nobody posted this:
Quote:
Traffic calming should be ultra aggressive. It should be impossible to pass 20mph inside the Midtown CBD.

•Extend the sidewalks
•Reduce the number of lanes to 2.
•Narrow the lanes.
•Mid block stop lights.
•Multiple speed bumps and rumble strips (with cutouts for bicycles).
•Serpentines.
•Camera enforcement at every red light, and speed cameras at strategic locations (pedestrian heavy)
•Congestion pricing.
•Close Broadway to all traffic between Battery Park and W 59th St, pedestrian only.
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Old 04-18-2013, 08:57 PM
 
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Well I did, just my opinion. Very aggressive traffic calming in a section of the city where driving should not be encouraged.

Mid block lights/stop signs could happen. It's done in some Euro cities, and even along our very own 6.5 Ave.

Heavy concentrations of speed bumps exist in our newer Slow Zones like Crotona Park East.

Street closures are most often weekend occurrences, but Broadway was pedestrianized in Times Sq and narrowed far south as Union Sq. I suggest complete pedestrianization from Battery Park to W 59th St along Broadway.

Sidewalk expansion and BRT only service was seriously considered for 34th St. It will be back on the table eventually (That street is a mess as is during the day).

The mayoral front runners are pro-congestion pricing. It will come back around.

Speed cameras are imminent.

Just a few examples.

15 MPH is fast enough for Midtown, it's not a thruway. It s a pedestrian heavy, CBD.

Last edited by nykiddo718718; 04-18-2013 at 09:08 PM..
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Really? So nobody posted this:

That's one person's opinion. I think there are some good ideas on that list and some not so good ones but that's not a reason to say all traffic calming is bad.

Traffic calming shouldn't be equated with speed bumps and stop signs -- which are for the most part lazy ways to slow or calm traffic, imo --though it might depend on the situation. Speed bumps which force you to slow to 5-10mph are fine for parking lots but not for busy streets. There are better ways to slow and reduce traffic congestion without being so disruptive (such as extending sidewalks, reducing traffic lanes, providing public transit and other transportation alternatives such as bikeshares and bike lanes, etc.)
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
That's one person's opinion. I think there are some good ideas on that list and some not so good ones but that's not a reason to say all traffic calming is bad.

Traffic calming shouldn't be equated with simply speed bumps and stop signs -- which are for the most part lazy ways to slow traffic, imo --though it might depend on the situation. Speed bumps which force you to slow to 5-10mph are fine for parking lots but not for busy streets. There are better ways to slow and reduce traffic congestion without being so disruptive (such as extending sidewalks, reducing traffic lanes, providing public transit and other transportation alternatives such as bikeshares and bike lanes, etc.)
The thing is, most of Midtown has more pedestrian density then any suburban parking lot during the day. Multiple speed bumps (like 3 per block) would be a welcomed addition to East/West side streets in Midtown. Mid block stops as well closer to the core (5th to 8th Ave) It's only about a 4 sq mile area (23rd to 59th, river to river) I suggest, so 2 miles straight of dealing with aggressive traffic calming over such a short distance beats pedestrians killed.

I propose sidewalk expansions on all the North/South Avenues and major East/West corridors like 23rd, 34th, 42nd, 57th St, ect with lane reduction and narrowing. No speed bumps on these, maybe rumble strips and speed cameras as major intersections are approached.

Red light cameras everywhere to discourage speeding to catch that light. I think I see people almost get hit every day in Midtown due to this. You'll see pedestrians begin to cross as the light changes and cars gun it, horns blazing.

With traffic 15-20 MPH, you won't need protected lanes, riders can share the road. Less lanes will discourage constant shifting, and narrow lanes will also help slow traffic. Larger sidewalks will increase pedestrian capacity.

Finally congestion pricing would do a great deal to keep some drivers out of Midtown. People should not want to drive around Midtown at all.

Last edited by nykiddo718718; 04-18-2013 at 09:32 PM..
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:33 PM
 
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As another way to combat suffocating traffic congestion in dense urban areas I would also seriously consider congestion pricing as was successfully implemented in London.
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:46 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,269,945 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
The thing is, most of Midtown has more pedestrian density then any suburban parking lot during the day. Multiple speed bumps (like 3 per block) would be a welcomed addition to East/West side streets in Midtown. Mid block stops as well closer to the core (5th to 8th Ave) It's only about a 4 sq mile area (23rd to 59th, river to river) I suggest, so 2 miles straight of dealing with aggressive traffic calming over such a short distance beats pedestrians killed.

I propose sidewalk expansions on all the North/South Avenues and major East/West corridors like 23rd, 34th, 42nd, 57th St, ect with lane reduction and narrowing. No speed bumps on these, maybe rumble strips and speed cameras as major intersections are approached.

Red light cameras everywhere to discourage speeding to catch that light. I think I see people almost get hit every day in Midtown due to this. You'll see pedestrians begin to cross as the light changes and cars gun it, horns blazing.

With traffic 15-20 MPH, you won't need protected lanes, riders can share the road. Less lanes will discourage constant shifting, and narrow lanes will also help slow traffic. Larger sidewalks will increase pedestrian capacity.

Finally congestion pricing would do a great deal to keep some drivers out of Midtown. People should not want to drive around Midtown at all.


Rumble strips or speed cushions might be better. Speed cushions allow you to safely pass over them at about 20 mph so you don't have to come to a full stop and they have cut outs for larger vehicles such as ambulances and fire trucks to pass over so they wouldn't slow down these emergency vehicles at all. But you probably don't want to use the term "speed bumps" or "stop signs" because it automatically triggers a lot of opposition and causes people to have negative perception of all traffic calming. You sort of have to be careful with the terminology.

I was going to say that red light camera are an eyesore especially in urban areas but midtown Manhattan is just nothing but wall to wall 100 foot billboards and giant neon signs and giant video screens everywhere so the cameras wouldn't likely be noticed in all that stuff anyway.
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:56 PM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,724,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Rumble strips or speed cushions might be better. Speed cushions allow you to safely pass over them at about 20 mph so you don't have to come to a full stop and they have cut outs for larger vehicles such as ambulances and fire trucks to pass over so they wouldn't slow down these emergency vehicles at all. But you probably don't want to use the term "speed bumps" or "stop signs" because it automatically triggers a lot of opposition and causes people to have negative perception of all traffic calming. You sort of have to be careful with the terminology.

I was going to say that red light camera are an eyesore especially in urban areas but midtown Manhattan is just nothing but wall to wall 100 foot billboards and giant neon signs and giant video screens everywhere so the cameras wouldn't likely be noticed in all that stuff anyway.
Check out my separate thread on this subject in the NYC forum.

My traffic calming, pedestrian safety plan for Midtown

I want to see what my neighbors think, lol-
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