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Old 04-20-2013, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,373 posts, read 5,996,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Lot cheaper you can get house for well under $50,00 where big city like New York or LA living in suburb over hour away from city cost well over $600,000 to $1,000,000.

If you wont to spend $2,000 month for one room Apartment by all means go for it but this is not American living if that case than move to Asia where they live in apartment and on top of one other.

The American lifestyle is car and house but that may change in the future like it is having inpect on some cities now in the US .

And yes there trade of living in town , country even small city under $400,000 people when comes to jobs and not say shopping.You may have to drive hour or more to town for shopping and drive to big city three times year or more to see doctor and do big shopping.

If one is into going to nightclubs ,bars and restaurants and city entertainment than yes town , country and even suburbs are not for those types of people.
$50,000 or $5,000? New York and LA are a bit different in that the suburbs are actually more expensive than the city. Particularly LA, where Los Angeles County is more expensive than the city of Los Angeles.
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Old 04-21-2013, 09:15 AM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,819,994 times
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
$50,000 or $5,000? New York and LA are a bit different in that the suburbs are actually more expensive than the city. Particularly LA, where Los Angeles County is more expensive than the city of Los Angeles.
Um, no. There are many areas in the suburbs of NYC which are more expensive than many areas of the city, but the most expensive areas to live are in NYC proper.

However, the NYC suburbs aren't all as direly expensive as sweat209 makes them out. Some of them are (I'm looking at you, anything-on-Hudson, NY) but a lot of them are much cheaper.
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Old 04-21-2013, 09:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Do you find people in suburbs have hobbies , interest ,food , culture , lifestyle and the way they dress so on different than the city.I find the city is more trendy and fashion oriented where the suburb is more individualism.
There are a number of suburban stereotypes which are not without truth where individualism is the last thing you'll see; the Jones's whom everyone is trying to keep up with definitely are suburbanites. But of course suburbs differ among themselves.
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Old 04-21-2013, 09:38 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
There are a number of suburban stereotypes which are not without truth where individualism is the last thing you'll see; the Jones's whom everyone is trying to keep up with definitely are suburbanites. But of course suburbs differ among themselves.
You know, one time on the Denver forum I said that there is a "keeping up with the Joneses mentality" regarding how many fourteeners you've climbed, how many double black diamonds you've skied, etc. It's not just possessions. Several agreed with me.
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Old 04-21-2013, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,373 posts, read 5,996,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Um, no. There are many areas in the suburbs of NYC which are more expensive than many areas of the city, but the most expensive areas to live are in NYC proper.

However, the NYC suburbs aren't all as direly expensive as sweat209 makes them out. Some of them are (I'm looking at you, anything-on-Hudson, NY) but a lot of them are much cheaper.
In reference to Manhattan and Brooklyn or the outer boroughs in comparison to the suburbs?
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Old 04-21-2013, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,373 posts, read 5,996,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
There are a number of suburban stereotypes which are not without truth where individualism is the last thing you'll see; the Jones's whom everyone is trying to keep up with definitely are suburbanites. But of course suburbs differ among themselves.
Exactly. One only has to look at the retail in the suburbs (or in suburban-like neighborhoods in areas of the Southeast, etc.). Macy's, Target, WalMart, Old Navy, Whole Foods, Trader Joes, etc. None of which scream individualism.
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Old 04-21-2013, 10:00 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Exactly. One only has to look at the retail in the suburbs (or in suburban-like neighborhoods in areas of the Southeast, etc.). Macy's, Target, WalMart, Old Navy, Whole Foods, Trader Joes, etc. None of which scream individualism.
As does Macy's (which seems to have taken over most department stores) in cities. I don't think retail is where you find much individualism, period. Sure, there are boutique-type stores that sell unique stuff, but most retail is clothes and other items from China, even in "the city", even at "Mom and Pop's".
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Old 04-21-2013, 10:02 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,877,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
There are a number of suburban stereotypes which are not without truth where individualism is the last thing you'll see; the Jones's whom everyone is trying to keep up with definitely are suburbanites. But of course suburbs differ among themselves.
Williamsburgh hipsters, wearing the latest in flannel fashion, are in no way, shape, or form conformists; nor are social climbers on the Upper East Side, viciously competing to get their children into $40,000-a-year preschools, trying to keep up with The Joneses. Every place has its own idiosyncratic pecking order and social norms.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Exactly. One only has to look at the retail in the suburbs (or in suburban-like neighborhoods in areas of the Southeast, etc.). Macy's, Target, WalMart, Old Navy, Whole Foods, Trader Joes, etc. None of which scream individualism.
I don't see how shopping at any of these places necessarily makes one a conformist. If you want an antique rocking chair, you go to a mom-and-pop antique store. If you want a socket wrench, you go to Home Depot.
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Old 04-21-2013, 02:50 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,648,427 times
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Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
Williamsburgh hipsters, wearing the latest in flannel fashion, are in no way, shape, or form conformists; nor are social climbers on the Upper East Side, viciously competing to get their children into $40,000-a-year preschools, trying to keep up with The Joneses. Every place has its own idiosyncratic pecking order and social norms.
.
I don't know any where in US where people where flannel shirts and ripped jeans other than State of ‪Washington in Seattle or King County , ‪Pierce County‬ the grunge fashion .
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Old 04-21-2013, 02:55 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,877,128 times
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Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
I don't know any where in US where people where flannel shirts and ripped jeans other than State of ‪Washington in Seattle or King County , ‪Pierce County‬ the grunge fashion .
I'm purposefully going off a stereotype, of course (though I've seen plenty of plaid in Philly's NoLibs and Pittsburgh's Lawrenceville--ripped jeans, not as far as I recall, but I'll try paying better attention next time ) but the point still stands. People are people and sheeple are sheeple. Most of us fall somewhere in between the "pure individualist" / "mindless follower" extremes, and that's a matter of human nature. If you buy fair trade coffee because your friends buy fair trade coffee, you're just as much a conformist as someone who buys a tract house in the outer ring suburbs because their friends are buying tract houses in the outer ring suburbs. It's not so much the choices we make as it is our personal reasons for making them.
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